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RE: Moire

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  • Catelli, Ann
    ... Sorry, no it is not if you are talking about the stuff that looks water stained. The effect is made by pressing the fabric through heated rollers. So it
    Message 1 of 1 , Feb 5, 2006
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      --- In Authentic_SCA@yahoogroups.com, "mace_tron" <baqbjm@...> wrote:
      >
      > I've seen some costumes made with moire satin, but I haven't been able
      > to find any information about when this fabric came into use, or if it
      > was ever used for clothing. If anyone could help me, I'd appreciate it.
      >
      > Thank-you,
      > Brenda
      > baqbjm@...
      >
      Sorry, no it is not if you are talking about the stuff that looks
      water stained. The effect is made by pressing the fabric through
      heated rollers. So it is a process that can be applied to fabric. I
      think it was a style of ribband that was sewn onto a gown - Colonial
      or Civil War era? It was also used in bookbinding and hatmaking OOP.

      Cassandra

      One of the tapestries in the Metropolitan Museum of Art, NYC shows a lady in a gown with the very distinct wood grain patterning on it; the style of the cartoon is fifteenth century, though no guarentees when the tapestry was actually woven.
      The gown I'm thinking of is blue.

      Ann in CT


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