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Re: Pillow stuffing

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  • Eirene Tzimiskina Kontostephanina
    ... A bit *too* early I m afraid. ;-) Lijsbet
    Message 1 of 18 , Feb 3, 2006
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      --- In Authentic_SCA@yahoogroups.com, NINacide@... wrote:
      >
      > _http://www.catherineshinn.com/acatalog/antique_pillows.htm_
      > (http://www.catherineshinn.com/acatalog/antique_pillows.htm)
      >
      > "The earliest Pillows were formed wrapped around leaves or straw"
      >
      > Mikhail
      >

      A bit *too* early I'm afraid. ;-)

      Lijsbet
    • Angharad ver' Reynulf
      ... From: kittencat3@aol.com To: Authentic_SCA@yahoogroups.com Sent: Wednesday, February 01, 2006 2:59:38 PM Subject: Re: [Authentic_SCA] Pillow stuffing
      Message 2 of 18 , Feb 3, 2006
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        ----- Original Message ----
        From: kittencat3@...
        To: Authentic_SCA@yahoogroups.com
        Sent: Wednesday, February 01, 2006 2:59:38 PM
        Subject: Re: [Authentic_SCA] Pillow stuffing


        Quilts were by and large stuffed with cotton (although linen quilts were also
        stuffed with wool in the 16th century), either rolled flat or "flockes" (raw
        chunks, most likely in trapunto). Not sure about pillows, though...what about
        feathers?

        Sarah Davies


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      • Angharad ver' Reynulf
        Apologies on the first message, my enter key was a bit touchy. I intended to ask what would be a relatively easy-to-find modern equivalent to the cotton used
        Message 3 of 18 , Feb 3, 2006
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          Apologies on the first message, my enter key was a bit touchy.

          I intended to ask what would be a relatively easy-to-find modern equivalent to the cotton used to stuff the earlier medieval quilts.

          Thank you,

          Angharad ver' Reynulf
        • Terri Morgan
          let me begin by stating that late 16th century is not my period. But I am re-vamping my first (pathetic) attempt at trous and a jerkin (or maybe a doublet this
          Message 4 of 18 , Feb 3, 2006
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            let me begin by stating that late 16th century is not my period. But I am
            re-vamping my first (pathetic) attempt at trous and a jerkin (or maybe a
            doublet this time) for my husband so he won't be out of place at
            Elizabethan-era events and demos. This, of course, led to a discussion about
            what he would like (good Viking that he is) and what I would be willing to
            make. And in the course of the discussion came a question not really
            addressed by "Patterns of Fashion" or QEWU, so far as I could find.
            Was it unusual for a man to have trous of one colour/fabric and a jerkin
            or doublet of another? Paintings seem to indicate that both top and bottom
            were matching yet what I've looked at could well be considered 'cursory'
            compared to those of you who are of later-period personas. I'd like to make
            two trous to every jerkin/doublet so he can work with no fear of having to
            change his entire outfit...


            Hrothny
          • Eirene Tzimiskina Kontostephanina
            ... equivalent to the cotton used to stuff the earlier medieval quilts. ... There is quite a bit of cotton batting on the market. Your local JoAnns should
            Message 5 of 18 , Feb 3, 2006
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              --- In Authentic_SCA@yahoogroups.com, Angharad ver' Reynulf
              <dragonwolfcat@...> wrote:
              >
              > Apologies on the first message, my enter key was a bit touchy.
              >
              > I intended to ask what would be a relatively easy-to-find modern
              equivalent to the cotton used to stuff the earlier medieval quilts.
              >
              > Thank you,
              >
              > Angharad ver' Reynulf
              >

              There is quite a bit of cotton batting on the market. Your local
              JoAnns should carry it.

              Lijsbet
            • Eirene Tzimiskina Kontostephanina
              ... ... I can t rule out feathers, but neither can I document their common use. The Paston inventories show that of thirteen pillows only two were
              Message 6 of 18 , Feb 3, 2006
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                --- In Authentic_SCA@yahoogroups.com, kittencat3@... wrote:
                <snip>
                > Not sure about pillows, though...what about
                > feathers?
                >

                I can't rule out feathers, but neither can I document their common
                use. The Paston inventories show that of thirteen pillows only two
                were remarkable enough to list the contents, that being down. The rest
                would seem to be common enough that a description of the contents
                wasn't required.

                Lijsbet
              • kittencat3@aol.com
                Two suggestions and a recommendation: For flocking, try either cotton cosmetic puffs or the soft outer layer of a roll of old-fashioned wound cotton. I ve
                Message 7 of 18 , Feb 3, 2006
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                  Two suggestions and a recommendation:

                  For flocking, try either cotton cosmetic puffs or the soft outer layer of a
                  roll of old-fashioned wound cotton. I've tried the latter and it does work,
                  and a lady on the Medieval Quilting tried the former with excellent results.

                  If you want to do flat quilting, use a Harriett Hargraves organic cotton
                  batt. It's marvelous to work with, and can be found pretty easily in quilt shops
                  and online.


                  Sarah Davies


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