Loading ...
Sorry, an error occurred while loading the content.
 

Re: medieval hair gel?

Expand Messages
  • Marc Carlson
    ... I wasn t intending to disparrage anython e research, I m just saying that sometimes there IS no exact word to translate to and from, For example, to make a
    Message 1 of 40 , Jan 4, 2006
      --- In Authentic_SCA@yahoogroups.com, Michelle -TJ- King
      <dona_violante@y...> wrote:
      >> often the case. When the term "lard" was used, they may have
      >> meant the nearest equivalent term to what they meant.
      > If it had been 'just anybody' doing the translation, I
      > would also have been suspicious. But this was work
      > done by the fine scholars on the Medieval Spain list,
      > and let me tell you: they *care* what the right word
      > really is! :)

      I wasn't intending to disparrage anython'e research, I'm just saying
      that sometimes there IS no exact word to translate to and from,

      For example, to make a slight aside, the front of the shoe is often
      called the toe, front, forepart, tip, and so on - depending on context
      and nuance (some of which you have to be inculcated with the mysteries
      of shoe crap to really key into the details). In Italian there is
      only one word for that part of the shoe, so if you are translating
      from Italian you may wind up picking a word that is close but may be
      contextually inaccurate.

      >> Ok, do lizards even HAVE fat or suet? If so they may have meant
      >> the suet in the one recipe and the melted oil in the other.
      > I don't think they meant cooking the lizard in its
      > *own* fat. That would take a lot of lizards!

      I'm sorry I was still on the hair gel :)

      For cooking it, I'd look at finding the suet from whatever critter was
      most commonly raised in that area :)

      > Either way, it looks like I will have time aplenty to
      > do proper research! My DH has effectively put the
      > kabosh on my experimental archaeology efforts for this
      > coming Saturday. Something about having to walk all
      > the way to the event if I smelled the least bit like
      > animal fat in his car... ;)

      Phhht. Shows where HIS priotities are :)

      > That's all right. I finally turned up a 13th century
      > Spanish treatise with a handful of "beauty recipes"
      > which shows some promise. :)

      That could be cool.

      I just got in an 18th century fencing manual that is wanting to
      distract me.

      Marc/Diarmaid
    • Katherine Throckmorton
      ... Rice or wheat starch would probobly also work. I suggest trying Asian grocery stores for starch, as they usually carry all sorts. I must confess that I
      Message 40 of 40 , Jan 5, 2006
        Lyle wrote:
        >
        > What if you're from a pre-potato culture?


        Rice or wheat starch would probobly also work. I suggest trying Asian grocery stores for starch, as they usually carry all sorts.
        I must confess that I often use potato starch. In my experience "starch is starch" in terms of stiffening properties, but potato starch tends to be less itchy.

        -Katherine


        --
        _______________________________________________

        Search for businesses by name, location, or phone number. -Lycos Yellow Pages

        http://r.lycos.com/r/yp_emailfooter/http://yellowpages.lycos.com/default.asp?SRC=lycos10
      Your message has been successfully submitted and would be delivered to recipients shortly.