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Re: Hoping for some help.../corduroy

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  • femmedelyon
    Welcome to the group, Monday Jan.2,2006 I commend your interest in authenticity. Yes, it is frustrating to see garb for sale that is rather expensive and
    Message 1 of 6 , Jan 2, 2006
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      Welcome to the group, Monday Jan.2,2006
      I commend your interest in authenticity. Yes, it is frustrating to
      see garb for sale that is rather expensive and not as authentic,even
      in fabric choice,as one would wish. Wool and linen are always a good
      bet. Using muslin for the "practice version" is good too since it's
      so much cheaper and if you make mistakes you havne't butchered your 6-
      plus-dollar a yard linen.
      Since you mention cotehardies and sideless surcoats I have to
      believe your interest is earlier-than-Elizabethan. I believe that
      curduroy isn't period for,say,the 14th century. I would recommend
      instead a good, solid,blankety wool. In my experience this is also
      generally more obtainable and cheaper since everyone is usually
      looking for finer wool thus leaving the field on heavy wool open to
      the rest of us.
      Might I also suggest,from experience,that(as cool as it looks)you
      make you cloak shorter rather than longer.Say ankle length or above
      since although a long,swoopy cloak looks cool it tends to drag in
      everything you don't want it to drag in,mud,water,the fire etc. Also
      wool is great for cloaks since it won't burn,always a plus around
      campfires. I can sympathize with you hunt for period fabrics since
      I'm always looking for them, for less,myself. Happy sewing!
      yours,
      Johanna


      > I have found garb online selling for hundreds of dollars
      > and made out of various poly blends including panne velvet (yuck)
      I
      > have questions about what fabrics would be acceptable. Wool and
      > linen, I know and have made kirtles, cotehardies, sideless
      surcoats.
      > (I also made a couple of chemises out of 100% cotton muslin for
      > practice.)
      >
      > >
      > Thanks,
      > Marge
      >
    • Heather Rose Jones
      ... Hi, welcome to the list. And welcome to the confusing world of authenticity. I think the one thing that helps keep most of us sane around the topic of
      Message 2 of 6 , Jan 2, 2006
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        On Jan 2, 2006, at 8:30 AM, Marge Adams wrote:

        > Greetings to you all!
        > I just joined this group because I am new to the SCA and have found
        > out that I'm kind of a stickler for authenticity. Or at least knowing
        > what would be authentic.
        >
        > I have been sewing garb and am already frustrated about what
        > is "period." I have found garb online selling for hundreds of dollars
        > and made out of various poly blends including panne velvet (yuck) I
        > have questions about what fabrics would be acceptable. Wool and
        > linen, I know and have made kirtles, cotehardies, sideless surcoats.
        > (I also made a couple of chemises out of 100% cotton muslin for
        > practice.)
        >

        Hi, welcome to the list. And welcome to the confusing world of
        authenticity. I think the one thing that helps keep most of us sane
        around the topic of historically authentic fabrics is deciding that
        the question is foremost a personal one. This re-directs the quest
        from asking "Would fabric X be acceptable?" (to whom? who gets to
        say it is?) to "Based on my current knowledge of historic practice,
        and based on my own goals, priorities, and circumstances, am I
        comfortable with choosing to use fabric X for my current purpose?"

        If you get into that head-space, then you can stop worrying about
        what fabrics other people may be using for the garments they make and/
        or sell (which can be a great relief) and focus on both expanding
        your knowledge of what was done historically and examining your own
        priorities so that you can deal sensibly with any necessary compromises.

        > On the SCA garb group, they have been talking about using wide-wale
        > corduroy for cloaks? Would that be period? Now I'm not judgemental
        > about what people choose to do, wear, etc. I just want to know if it
        > would have been done and it seems like I get jumped on just for
        > asking. Or when I ask about using cotton velvet, I just want to KNOW.

        The problem is, it's rarely a question of simple "yes" or "no".
        (Sometimes it is, but rarely.) It's fairly rare for there to be a
        single answer to "is X period?" because the specifics can vary
        enormously across time and space within the SCA's scope. But even
        more complicated is that questions like this generally come down more
        to considerations like, "How close is modern fabric X (which I can
        get) to historic fabric Y (which I can't get)?" or "If I can't find a
        commercially available fabric today with all the characteristics of
        the historic fabric I want to emulate, what fabrics are available
        that most resemble that fabric and what are the reasons for
        compromising in one direction rather than another?" (This is the
        perennial problem with trying to emulate historic velvets.)

        Tangwystyl

        --
        Heather Rose Jones
        heather.jones@...
        http://www.heatherrosejones.com
        LJ:hrj
      • Amy Heilveil
        In addition to Tangwystyl s wonderful advice, let me add this: in part, the fabric that would be correct for your persona depends on time, place, and societal
        Message 3 of 6 , Jan 3, 2006
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          In addition to Tangwystyl's wonderful advice, let me add this: in part, the
          fabric that would be correct for your persona depends on time, place, and
          societal ranking (I mean of the society you are trying to emulate, not the
          SCA).

          A 9th century Pict woman would not have worn silk, but more likely wool. A
          10th century Chinese princess would have worn silk. A 16th century English
          noble woman would have had clothes of silk, wool, and linen. Time and place
          matters for this question.

          So where/when are you researching? :)

          Smiles,
          Despina


          [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
        • jeffrey.heilveil@ndsu.edu
          ... Well, the funny thing about the SCA is that it covers a wide range of time and geography. For example, Fina, who has an early-period persona from the
          Message 4 of 6 , Jan 3, 2006
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            Marge asked:

            > Would that be period?

            Well, the funny thing about the SCA is that it covers a wide range of time
            and geography. For example, Fina, who has an early-period persona from
            the Isles, wouldn't have traveled to war, as she told us earlier. For
            Despina and I, on the other hand, in the first half of the 15th Century on
            the Transylvanian-Wallachian border, we probably would have, because of
            where the battlefronts were at the time and what it would mean if those
            nasty Ottomans overran Brasov (yogurt EVERYWHERE!).

            So you see, it's incredibly helpful if we have a general idea of the
            when/where that interests you. Of course, that's harder since you're new
            and may not have found your area/time of interest yet.

            Welcome and good luck. I'll leave the question answering to the
            textile-inclined.

            Bogdan

            -----------------------------------------------------------
            Jeffrey S. Heilveil, Ph.D.
            Postdoctoral Fellow
            Department of Biological Sciences
            North Dakota State University
            Stevens Hall
            Fargo, ND 58105
            jeffrey.heilveil@...
          • Marge Adams
            ... I ve decided on late 14th century, hence the cotehardies, etc. Most likely England, though I am also interested in the Low Countries. (However info on
            Message 5 of 6 , Jan 3, 2006
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              --- In Authentic_SCA@yahoogroups.com, Amy Heilveil
              <amyheilveil@g...> wrote:
              >
              > So where/when are you researching? :)
              >
              > Smiles,
              > Despina
              >


              I've decided on late 14th century, hence the cotehardies, etc. Most
              likely England, though I am also interested in the Low Countries.
              (However info on that area for the time period is
              somewhat...elusive.)
              My 14yo daughter is doing the same period and we have made a lot of
              basic stuff. I'm trying to figure out what might be nice for court
              or a ball. Also, what might be good for a masqued ball.
              (Specifically, masque ideas.)

              My sons want to be Mongols which is proving to be a little more
              challenging for me. Silk dels for 12 & 13 yo boys? I don't think
              so. Linen doesn't seem appropriate, so cotton? Wool? I just don't
              know... I am getting closer to actually being ready to cut
              something out, finally, esp. with help from the link on this site.
              But what to use?

              Does that help?
              Marge
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