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Re: [Authentic_SCA] "Authentic"?

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  • Joannah Hansen
    ... Another thing to keep in mind, IMO, is that it is veeeerrrryyy easy for what is being said in text to *sound* critical and curt, even if the sender isn t
    Message 1 of 14 , Jan 2, 2006
      >Yes.
      >More than anything, I think it highlighted how we tend to read
      >intentions into each other's text that comes more from the ferment
      >of our own insecurities than is the authors intent.
      >
      >I think that is the main lesson we need to remind ourselves of,
      >when this topic comes up (as it has done, and will do).
      >
      >That's the lesson _I_ came away with, at any rate.
      >I now try to remind myself that plain text emails are a p*ss-poor
      >medium for reading others' subtextual conversations, and ideal
      >for crafting imaginary ones that in reality mirror our own subtexts.
      >I now try to remind myself to think twice before being offended.
      >I now try to remind myself to use Occam's Razor in all
      >conversations.
      >I sometimes fail. But at least I try.
      >
      >I get a lot less huffy on the net these days as a result, and I am
      >happier about it.
      >
      >Capt Elias

      Another thing to keep in mind, IMO, is that it is veeeerrrryyy easy for what is being 'said' in text to *sound* critical and curt, even if the sender isn't trying to be so.

      I am aware, myself, that most of my posts 'sound' very formal, and perhaps a bit cold, even, as I *cannot* bring myself to _not_ 'talk' correctly. ( If that makes sense? )

      I guess that's why emoticons were invented! :-)

      My 2cents worth.

      Joannah

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    • Marc Carlson
      ... Spectacles go back at least as far as the 1280s, but these were just magnification lenses to correct for far-sightedness and presbyopia. Those of us with
      Message 2 of 14 , Jan 2, 2006
        --- In Authentic_SCA@yahoogroups.com, "Jessica" <noinini@t...> wrote:
        > This is one area in which I would love more information. When and
        > where did glasses start to be worn, and when did they become more
        > commonplace? Not only that, but what do those of us who are
        > optically challenged do with or without our glasses at events? ;-)

        Spectacles go back at least as far as the 1280s, but these were just
        magnification lenses to correct for far-sightedness and presbyopia.
        Those of us with near-sightedness only started getting correction in
        the late 1500s/early 1600s.

        When did they become common is a different question - and one that's
        harder to answer. When I was a kid, people with glasses were still in
        the extreme minority since they were so blinking expensive (hence
        silly rules/sayings like "never hit a kid with glasses" and "boys
        don't make passes at girls who wear glasses"). So I would say that
        well into the 20th century there were people who had imperfect vision
        who weren't wearing glasses.

        What do I do with my glasses at events? I wear them or I don't :)

        I have a pair of the fake bone folding glasses with my prescription
        (which is of course inaccurate to the frames style) in them, but it's
        not like they were designed to be worn all the time, and honesly,
        switching back and forth between them, and having to make sure they
        are set right to get the lenses angled correctly is a real pain, so
        they tend to stay at home. I have a pair of frames for a later era of
        glasses (meant to be worn with my 18th century stuff) and recently
        went to get an estimate for having lenses for them made. Glass is
        still expensive (and the request confused the lens shop a little, so
        those will have to wait.

        Marc/Diarmaid
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