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Re: Medieval Cookies

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  • ashgrove1293
    ... recipe with ... make up ... hefty ... pizzelle ... Would it be possiable to post that recipe? We make pizzelles a lot at home. And am curious as to the
    Message 1 of 10 , Dec 31, 2005
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      > However, in the interim I developed a "fake" that I use for feasts,
      > based on the first iteration he talks about. I use a pizzelle
      recipe with
      > the sugar cut WAY back (spice rather than body) and flour added to
      make up
      > the difference, some boiled-down wine added for flavoring, and a
      hefty
      > amount of ginger and a dash of white pepper, baked, of course, in a
      pizzelle
      > iron. It is not entirely period, I grant, but it's close enough


      Would it be possiable to post that recipe? We make pizzelles "a lot"
      at home. And am curious as to the taste of these as opposed to our
      recipe.

      Do you let your batter sit in the fridge before "baking" them?

      Mariassa of Ashgrove
      ashgrove@...
    • Giovanna d'Este
      To make about forty pizzelles that fake a medieval wafer: 5 eggs 1/2 cup white sugar 1 teaspoon baking powder 2 teaspoons powdered ginger (you can increase
      Message 2 of 10 , Jan 2, 2006
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        To make about forty pizzelles that fake a medieval wafer:

        5 eggs
        1/2 cup white sugar
        1 teaspoon baking powder
        2 teaspoons powdered ginger (you can increase this for more warmth)
        1/4 tsp. white pepper (you can increase this for more bite)
        2 tablespoons wine reduction*
        1/2 c. butter, melted.
        1/2 c. shortening, melted.
        6 + cups flour

        *I make the wine reduction by boiling a bottle of a good white wine down to
        about four ounces of liquid, thereby getting flavor without too much liquid
        in my batter.

        Melt the butter and the shortening, sift the dry ingredients together, and
        beat it all together, and cook in golf-ball-sized balls on a pizzelle iron
        45 seconds or til just starting to color (although they're good golden brown
        too.) I scoop mine with a 3/4 oz food service scoop, which works quite well
        to produce the right size balls. Flavor intensifies slightly if left to sit.
        Wrap tightly to store. They freeze well.

        I like to combine them with fresh melon and candied spices to give a true
        medieval dessert course that generally is a nice sort of thing after some
        heavily spiced, complex sauces. At Bardic Madness South in December, my
        co-cook and I did dessert plates involving these, Excellent Small Cakes,
        gingerbrede, and candied orange and lemon peels, which admittedly crosses
        periods but was all pretty much pre-1600 in flavor and source.

        I don't refrigerate my batter, and haven't noticed any difference in how it
        behaves from the beginning of the batch to the end. I'll try that next time
        I make them.

        Feel free to play with this and let me know how your experiments turn out.

        Al vostro servizio,
        Signora Giovanna d'Este

        Vert, on a billet Or three fleurs-de-lys, one and two, sable, a bordure
        dancetty Or.

        "Numquam Succumbe"

        > Date: Sat, 31 Dec 2005 13:42:58 -0000
        > From: "ashgrove1293" <ashgrove@...>
        >Subject: Re: Medieval Cookies
        >
        > > However, in the interim I developed a "fake" that I use for feasts,
        > > based on the first iteration he talks about. I use a pizzelle
        >recipe with
        > > the sugar cut WAY back (spice rather than body) and flour added to
        >make up
        > > the difference, some boiled-down wine added for flavoring, and a
        >hefty
        > > amount of ginger and a dash of white pepper, baked, of course, in a
        >pizzelle
        > > iron. It is not entirely period, I grant, but it's close enough
        >
        >
        >Would it be possiable to post that recipe? We make pizzelles "a lot"
        >at home. And am curious as to the taste of these as opposed to our
        >recipe.
        >
        >Do you let your batter sit in the fridge before "baking" them?
        >
        >Mariassa of Ashgrove
        >ashgrove@...
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