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Period Starch or How to Stiffen Linen

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  • Emmie
    First, I have x-posted this and I apologize to those that currently have the feeling of deja-vu. In the spring I plan on submitting my first ever A&S item for
    Message 1 of 7 , Dec 6, 2005
      First, I have x-posted this and I apologize to those that currently
      have the feeling of deja-vu. In the spring I plan on submitting my
      first ever A&S item for a competition. The issue I am trying to iron
      out is how to stiffen linen in a period manner. I do not want to use
      buckram or interfacing for the toque I intend on making, I would like
      to use linen that has been stiffened... possible 2-4 layers (as I
      complete it I am sure that will become clearer. The toque is from
      Eastern Europe (German) area. I am trying to figure out the
      appropriate way of making starch. I have ruled out potato starch due
      to the region. There was mention of boiling down rice to make a
      starch from someone I know, but I want to get a general consensus.
      Thank you for any advice or nudge in the apporpriate direction you may
      offer.

      YIS,
      Elisabeth Hänsel
    • Amy Heilveil
      I would suggest wheat starch. Smiles, Despina de la it s a direction [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
      Message 2 of 7 , Dec 6, 2005
        I would suggest wheat starch.

        Smiles,
        Despina de la it's a direction


        [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
      • jeffrey.heilveil@ndsu.edu
        I know that the limners typically use wheat starch, and that it may have been the starch used in period sugarpaste (there is one recipe that calls for starch
        Message 3 of 7 , Dec 6, 2005
          I know that the limners typically use wheat starch, and that it may have
          been the starch used in period sugarpaste (there is one recipe that calls
          for starch that I have found).

          Despina could probably give you info on the source that talks about starch
          for limners.

          Hope this helps.
          Bogdan

          -----------------------------------------------------------
          Jeffrey S. Heilveil, Ph.D.
          Postdoctoral Fellow
          Department of Biological Sciences
          North Dakota State University
          Stevens Hall
          Fargo, ND 58105
          jeffrey.heilveil@...
        • borderlands15213
          In Jane Ashelford s A Visual History of the Sixteenth Century, I *think* is where I read this: starch for stiffening ruffs (and other items, of course) was
          Message 4 of 7 , Dec 6, 2005
            In Jane Ashelford's "A Visual History of the Sixteenth Century," I
            *think* is where I read this: starch for stiffening ruffs (and other
            items, of course) was obtained by "seething" barley---not wheat. As
            near as I can tell, the seething is similar to simmering, as opposed
            to boiling.
            That's what I recall reading.
            And what step or steps, if any, came between the seething and the
            application (which I have assumed is immersion of the article to be
            stiffened), I don't know.

            Of course, that's predominantly English fashions, as far as I recall,
            and not German, and it *is* Sixteenth Century, neither of which might
            be very helpful, documentation-wise. (Sorry: not recalling the time-
            frame for the linen toque.)

            Yseult the Gentle
            --- In Authentic_SCA@yahoogroups.com, Amy Heilveil <amyheilveil@g...>
            wrote:
            >
            > I would suggest wheat starch.

            > Despina de la it's a direction

            >
          • Dawn Malmstrom
            Either wheat paste or rice paste would work. The recipe for either is simple. One part flour of your choice to four and a half or five parts water. Let sit for
            Message 5 of 7 , Dec 6, 2005
              Either wheat paste or rice paste would work. The recipe for either is
              simple. One part flour of your choice to four and a half or five parts
              water. Let sit for half an hour. Heat over low heat (double boiler)
              stirring constantly, bring to a boil for no more than thirty seconds
              (or it gets to gellatinous. Apply it to the linen while still warm
              then shape the linen.

              One caveat is that both of these starches will soften in high humidity
              or contact with water.

              There are other glues out there that are more sturdy against these,
              fish glue and hide glue for example. Cenninni has a recipe for fish
              glue (as well as wheat paste).

              Hide glue is simple to make, too, just boil scraps of leather(undyed)
              or parchment in water. Reduce over heat until it is almost gelatinous.
              Use while hot (it doesn't reheat). Shape and let dry.

              Donata Bonacorsi
            • jeffrey.heilveil@ndsu.edu
              ... If you add more water to dried hyde glue, it will reconstitute (or hide glue, however you prefer to spell it). I only know this because I ve done it a few
              Message 6 of 7 , Dec 6, 2005
                Donata said:
                > Hide glue is simple to make, too, just boil scraps of leather(undyed)
                > or parchment in water. Reduce over heat until it is almost gelatinous.
                > Use while hot (it doesn't reheat). Shape and let dry.

                If you add more water to dried hyde glue, it will reconstitute (or hide
                glue, however you prefer to spell it). I only know this because I've done
                it a few times. On the same pot of glue.

                Bogdan

                -----------------------------------------------------------
                Jeffrey S. Heilveil, Ph.D.
                Postdoctoral Fellow
                Department of Biological Sciences
                North Dakota State University
                Stevens Hall
                Fargo, ND 58105
                jeffrey.heilveil@...
              • Emmie
                ... recall, ... might ... I apologize, I was thinking faster than I was typing and I did not put the time frame at hand... 1300-1350 (Manesse Codex.) Al of
                Message 7 of 7 , Dec 6, 2005
                  > Of course, that's predominantly English fashions, as far as I
                  recall,
                  > and not German, and it *is* Sixteenth Century, neither of which
                  might
                  > be very helpful, documentation-wise. (Sorry: not recalling the time-
                  > frame for the linen toque.)

                  I apologize, I was thinking faster than I was typing and I did not put
                  the time frame at hand... 1300-1350 (Manesse Codex.) Al of the input
                  has been wonderful, thank you!

                  Elisabeth
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