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toilet paper reference?

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  • Tiffany Brown
    [Of traitors.....] Said the King, for I have a use for them at the moment. But they are just like bits of rag: Once you have had your use of them, You throw
    Message 1 of 8 , Nov 13, 2005
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      [Of traitors.....]
      Said the King, "for I have a use for them at the moment.
      But they are just like bits of rag:
      Once you have had your use of them,
      You throw them in the latrines."

      Dist li Reis, "c'est ore un porchaz,
      Qu'il est d'els comme de torchaz:
      Quant I'om en a faite s'ouvraingne,
      Sil jete l'om en la longaingne."

      The History of William Marshall v2
      (from line 12697) written early 13th C, but speaking of late 12th C events.

      So opinions? Is that a literal translation from the old anglo-norman
      french? Is he reffering to toilet paper rags, or to other household
      rags, which surely would be of use to papermakers (or perhaps we are
      we too early for that), or various other industries.

      what do you think?
      Teffania
    • Mike Keyser
      The History Channel says that a Ming Emperor ordered toilet paper to be made for him and some of his higher-ups. His was extra special though. It was yellow,
      Message 2 of 8 , Dec 6, 2005
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        The History Channel says that a Ming Emperor ordered toilet paper to
        be made for him and some of his higher-ups. His was extra special
        though. It was yellow, perfumed, and 3 feet wide.


        --- In Authentic_SCA@yahoogroups.com, Tiffany Brown <teffania@g...>
        wrote:
        >
        > [Of traitors.....]
        > Said the King, "for I have a use for them at the moment.
        > But they are just like bits of rag:
        > Once you have had your use of them,
        > You throw them in the latrines."
        >
        > Dist li Reis, "c'est ore un porchaz,
        > Qu'il est d'els comme de torchaz:
        > Quant I'om en a faite s'ouvraingne,
        > Sil jete l'om en la longaingne."
        >
        > The History of William Marshall v2
        > (from line 12697) written early 13th C, but speaking of late 12th C
        events.
        >
        > So opinions? Is that a literal translation from the old anglo-norman
        > french? Is he reffering to toilet paper rags, or to other household
        > rags, which surely would be of use to papermakers (or perhaps we are
        > we too early for that), or various other industries.
        >
        > what do you think?
        > Teffania
        >
      • Jessica
        What program? Did they say which Ming Emperor? Who says that the rear end has to stink? Findabhair _____ From: Authentic_SCA@yahoogroups.com
        Message 3 of 8 , Dec 6, 2005
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          What program? Did they say which Ming Emperor?



          Who says that the rear end has to stink?



          Findabhair



          _____

          From: Authentic_SCA@yahoogroups.com [mailto:Authentic_SCA@yahoogroups.com]
          On Behalf Of Mike Keyser
          Sent: December 6, 2005 10:13 PM
          To: Authentic_SCA@yahoogroups.com
          Subject: [Authentic_SCA] Re: toilet paper reference? History Channel today



          The History Channel says that a Ming Emperor ordered toilet paper to
          be made for him and some of his higher-ups. His was extra special
          though. It was yellow, perfumed, and 3 feet wide.



          [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
        • borderlands15213
          Three feet wide? Was this stuff being used as seat covers? Yseult ... [mailto:Authentic_SCA@yahoogroups.com] ... to
          Message 4 of 8 , Dec 7, 2005
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            Three feet wide? Was this stuff being used as seat covers?

            Yseult

            --- In Authentic_SCA@yahoogroups.com, "Jessica" <noinini@t...> wrote:
            >
            > What program? Did they say which Ming Emperor?
            > Who says that the rear end has to stink?
            > Findabhair

            > From: Authentic_SCA@yahoogroups.com
            [mailto:Authentic_SCA@yahoogroups.com]
            > On Behalf Of Mike Keyser
            <<<snipped>>>
            > The History Channel says that a Ming Emperor ordered toilet paper
            to
            > be made for him and some of his higher-ups. His was extra special
            > though. It was yellow, perfumed, and 3 feet wide.

            > [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
            >
          • NINacide@aol.com
            sorry, when it comes to remembering names, I m the worst. I m sure they ll show the show again. You ll know it when you see it because it basically says
            Message 5 of 8 , Dec 7, 2005
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              sorry, when it comes to remembering names, I'm the worst. I'm sure they'll
              show the show again. You'll know it when you see it because it basically
              says that every great invention that came out of Europe was predated by
              thousands of years by the chinese. And I think the 3 feet wide part had something to
              do with the manufacturing process that they had back them caused them to
              make wider sheets and in our case those sheets would seem to be overkill. But
              I'm sure if he wanted to tear off a 6 by 6 inch part of the 3 foot wide
              tapestry o' TP, he could.


              [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
            • wodeford
              ... As I ve begun studying early Japan, I ve encountered a rule of thumb that if the Japanese had it, the Chinese probably had it first. China supposedly had
              Message 6 of 8 , Dec 7, 2005
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                --- In Authentic_SCA@yahoogroups.com, "Mike Keyser" <NINacide@a...> wrote:
                >
                > The History Channel says that a Ming Emperor ordered toilet paper to
                > be made for him and some of his higher-ups. His was extra special
                > though. It was yellow, perfumed, and 3 feet wide.

                As I've begun studying early Japan, I've encountered a rule of thumb
                that if the Japanese had it, the Chinese probably had it first.

                China supposedly had paper technology since about 100 CE.
                http://www.computersmiths.com/chineseinvention/paper.htm

                The illustrations show paper being produced in large sheets, and are
                consistent with what I've seen on Japanese paper production. Large
                sheets can, of course, be cut down to useful sizes....

                http://www.toiletpaperworld.com/tpw/encyclopedia/navigation/funfacts.htm
                dates the Emperor's toilet paper to 1391 CE.

                Toilet tissue as we know it was first marketed in the 19th century.

                Jehanne de Wodeford, West
              • Cynthia J Ley
                ... My guess would be that the rags were fabric scraps too small to be useful for anything else. Bits of worn out tunic, etc. I would think it s too early
                Message 7 of 8 , Dec 8, 2005
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                  > > [Of traitors.....]
                  > > Said the King, "for I have a use for them at the moment.
                  > > But they are just like bits of rag:
                  > > Once you have had your use of them,
                  > > You throw them in the latrines."
                  > >
                  > > Dist li Reis, "c'est ore un porchaz,
                  > > Qu'il est d'els comme de torchaz:
                  > > Quant I'om en a faite s'ouvraingne,
                  > > Sil jete l'om en la longaingne."
                  > >
                  > > The History of William Marshall v2
                  > > (from line 12697) written early 13th C, but speaking of late 12th
                  > C
                  > events.
                  > >
                  > > So opinions? Is that a literal translation from the old
                  > anglo-norman
                  > > french? Is he reffering to toilet paper rags, or to other
                  > household
                  > > rags, which surely would be of use to papermakers (or perhaps we
                  > are
                  > > we too early for that), or various other industries.
                  > >
                  > > what do you think?
                  > > Teffania

                  My guess would be that the "rags" were fabric scraps too small to be
                  useful for anything else. Bits of worn out tunic, etc. I would think it's
                  too early for paper.

                  Sure beats cleaning your bum with a bunch of leaves, though. :)

                  Arlys
                • NINacide@aol.com
                  MODERATOR S NOTE - PLEASE SIGN YOUR POSTS! THANK YOU. leaves? try pine cones... hehe. [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
                  Message 8 of 8 , Dec 8, 2005
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                    MODERATOR'S NOTE - PLEASE SIGN YOUR POSTS! THANK YOU.


                    leaves? try pine cones... hehe.


                    [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
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