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New book on Medieval Jewish women

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  • msgilliandurham
    Gilliand here, sitting here reading Choice magazine (the primary source of book, etc., reviews for academic libraries) and seeing this - - thought some here
    Message 1 of 2 , Oct 6, 2005
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      Gilliand here, sitting here reading Choice magazine (the primary
      source of book, etc., reviews for academic libraries) and seeing this -
      - thought some here might be interested:

      "Pious and rebellious: Jewish women in Medieval Europe" by Avraham
      Grossman, translated by Jonathan Chipman. ISBN: 1584653914, $65;
      paperback ISBN: 1584653922, $29.95.

      This is "Highly recommended. All academic levels/libraries"

      YIS -- Gillian Durham
    • willo
      ... I just got my copy yesterday. I was very excited to hear about it. It is exactly up my alley. :) In the same order, I also got: Mothers and Children:
      Message 2 of 2 , Oct 8, 2005
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        --- In Authentic_SCA@yahoogroups.com, "msgilliandurham" <msgilliandurham@y...>
        wrote:
        >
        > Gilliand here, sitting here reading Choice magazine (the primary
        > source of book, etc., reviews for academic libraries) and seeing this -
        > - thought some here might be interested:
        >
        > "Pious and rebellious: Jewish women in Medieval Europe" by Avraham
        > Grossman,...

        I just got my copy yesterday. I was very excited to hear about it. It is exactly up my alley. :)

        In the same order, I also got: "Mothers and Children: Jewish Family Life in Medieval Europe"
        by Elisheva Baumgarten.

        "Mothers and Children" is based upon French/German sources primarily, but I expect it
        will still be interesting/informational for my interests. I'm 53 pages into it, and definitely
        finding new facts (with sources well identified.) For example, Jewish women could use a
        Christian midwife (with a Jewish chaperon always on hand), but a Jewish midwife was not
        permitted (by local Jewish rules) to tend to a Christian woman in labor.

        That could be relevant for persona development. For me, I'm simply fascinated by how
        women (especially Jewish) went about their daily lives.

        --Joya
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