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Re: [Authentic_SCA] late-15th C . W-European Dances - query for the List.

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  • Karen Hall
    Hi Julian, ... For English dance in this period your best source is the Gresley manuscript (c.1500). From a very quick google search, one site with a
    Message 1 of 22 , Sep 28, 2005
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      Hi Julian,

      > some few members of our Group would like to learn some of the steps
      > and moves and music to some of the late mediæval dances known in the
      > Courts of England and Burgundy between1450 and 1509
      >
      > 2] Could we have your recommendations of sources for
      >
      > a] books of in-period dance steps
      >
      > b] Recordings of suitable dance music - [we have no accomplished
      > musicians amongst us who could provide "live accompaniment"]

      For English dance in this period your best source is the Gresley
      manuscript (c.1500). From a very quick google search, one site with a
      description of the dances and steps involved is
      http://members.ozemail.com.au/~grayn1/gresley/Gresley.html
      There are some music files off this site as well.

      For some really good recording of the Gresley music, and some other dances
      from around this period 'Eschewynge of Ydlenesse: Music for Dancing - from
      the Middle Ages and Renaissance' by Misericordia & Gaïta is really good
      (not affiliated, just have the CD on high rotation at home) and there is
      a booklet that accompanies the CD with the dances set out in it. See
      www.btinternet.com/~gaita/cd.html

      I hope this helps,

      Alessandra
    • Tiffany Brown
      This september I m celebrating my third full year of no shampoo or conditioner. It s been nearly a year since my hair was even thoroughly wet. I was changing
      Message 2 of 22 , Sep 29, 2005
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        This september I'm celebrating my third full year of no shampoo or
        conditioner. It's been nearly a year since my hair was even
        thoroughly wet. I was changing from once a week washing, so the
        change was not as severe. Instead I brush my hair, and brush it some
        more, clean my brush and brush it again.

        I must say that I find this method works better FOR ME than the rather
        unsatisfactory oily (and itchy after 3 days) scalp. Benefits- less
        oily scalp, more oil in ends, an extra 10-15cm growth (had stopped
        lengthening prior to haircare change), no more waiting for 10+ hours
        for hair to dry. Limitations: no swimming (salt or chlorine bad),
        hair always plaited except for special occasions (after which extra
        brushing - tangles), best to cover hair when doing messy tasks, and
        takes up to 6 months to settle into new haircare method.
        And no my hair never gets excessively greasy, just occasionally the
        scalp - the ends are always on the dry side, the only problem is
        transporting those oils from the scalp to the ends. A hot rinse will
        lower oil levels, but brushing has the added benefit of moisturising
        the ends.

        During transition from washing to brushing, I did rinse my hair,
        washing herbal tissanes through it. Be cautious of using too much
        fresh (dried or smaller quantities might be ok) rosemary or lemonbalm
        - can leave the hair sticky and difficult to comb. I quite like
        cloves and cinamon as a rinse, and doesn't need to be washed out.
        (although I never managed to make a strong enough infusion that my
        hair smelt of them the next day). You can make a little cloth
        "teabag" for your herbs or spices, making life easier.

        I have absolutely no proof of periodicity. In fact there are a few
        recepies for hair dyes, and I think even a few for shampoo
        substitutes, so this argues that at least some women weren't using
        this method. I don't know how well i would work if one was engaged in
        dirtier jobs eg cook or field labourer.

        The trouble is, I think this will be fairly difficult to find evidence
        of. It's not evidence of a practise, but evidence of a lack of a
        practise (frequent hair washing) that we need to prove. And It's the
        sort of everyday thing people leave out of records. One though for me
        is - a lot of bathing pictures show women in bathtubs with hair bound
        up out of the water - suggesting that one might not wish to get the
        hair wet when bathing. It would be even easier to keep the hair dry
        when sponge bathing.

        At the last camping event I was inspired to hire (bribe with clothing)
        a maid to brush my hair twice daily, turning a chore instead into a
        relaxing time each day. And despite the very dusty environment, my
        hair kept quite clean thanks to this extra level of care.

        A though on hairbrushes versus combs - combs would be more effective
        at nit removal. I think combs may also be a bit easier to use on a
        friend than yourself (the opposite of brushes) and a medieval
        household of any kind would be likely to have more than one female in
        it.

        Sorry for talking so long, I guess I just wanted to convey that this
        haircare method does seem to make sense of period practises - keep
        your hair braided most of the time (except maybe girls who are
        courting), wear a veil, hat or hood frequently, tie up your hair when
        bathing. But then so could other methods, especially this method in
        combination with herbal rinses.

        If anyone has any information on the period use (or lack thereof) of
        this method PLEASE share. I'd love to know (and I know I'm not the
        only one).

        Teffania


        On 9/29/05, Maggie Forest <maggie@...> wrote:
        >
        >
        > >But what about the hair? I distinctly recall that if you don't wash
        > >your hair at all, but keep it regularly brushed, and when necessary
        > >use things like corn meal or rye flour help brush/comb out excess
        > >grease and dirt.
        >
        > you don't really need to add any dry stuff if you've gone the path of
        > not using shampoo, just immersing your hair in warm water occasionally
        > will take the worst out. a fine-tooth comb will keep VM out. I know
        > this because I have an incredibly sensitive scalp (actually my skin in
        > general) that hates all commercial cosmetics, so I have periods when I
        > cannot use shampoo or soaps because they make my hair fall out and my
        > skin bleed from the scratching.
        >
        > Soapwort is a european plant which I have used at events to wash my
        > hair. I've prepared it in advance, but there's absolutely nothing
        > stopping you having a haircare session at camp where you start by
        > cooking up the soapwort and then washing your hair in the solution.
        > It's very gentle, and it is one of my alternatives to commercial
        > shampoos. you can add other types of herbs to the infusion for scent
        > or in my case to calm the itching. a good scent is lemon balm or mints
        > or even rosemary, if you can handle that on your skin.
        >
        > /maggie
      • Deirdre D'Argenteuil
        ... Ooh, me too! Honestly, I maybe use actual shampoo on my head about once a month. The rest of the time I rinse it occasionally and wear it in a french
        Message 3 of 22 , Oct 1, 2005
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          > this because I have an incredibly sensitive scalp
          > (actually my skin in
          > general) that hates all commercial cosmetics,

          Ooh, me too! Honestly, I maybe use actual shampoo on
          my head about once a month. The rest of the time I
          rinse it occasionally and wear it in a french braid or
          a large bun on the back of my head. My hair is thick
          and past my waist. I never have dandruff or look as
          if I haven't washed my hair. If it gets wet it takes
          almost an entire day to dry. I can imagine that would
          be a health hazard in a drafty castle. I've read
          articles on the internet from other people who don't
          use shampoo and they claim that your scalp produces
          less oil as a result of not shampooing...

          Viscountess Deirdre D'Argenteuil, OL
          Barony of Atenveldt
          * * * * * *
          http://www.catster.com/?107095



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