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Re: period form of wedding cake?

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  • taamarfox
    A bit late, but still in time for a November wedding! There are several ways to lighten a cake without chemical leaveners. The most documentable is to not
    Message 1 of 4 , Sep 27, 2005
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      A bit late, but still in time for a November wedding!


      There are several ways to lighten a cake without chemical leaveners.
      The most documentable is to not bother with 'cake' and use a sweet
      yeast bread instead. Actually, there are plenty of recipes (one from
      Forme of Cury) which use fresh sewet bread crumbs held together with
      honey!

      Egg foam was also mentioned, but without doing some research I have
      no idea if it's period. I CAN document egg foam cakes in Imperial
      Rome, though. This type of cake if very dry and is usually sliced
      into thin layers which are brushed with sugar syrup (or honey, or
      liqueur) before being stacked with fruit or cream fillings. The other
      option is butter cake. Butter beats up light and fluffy when it's
      about 78 degrees, it leavens cake quite nicely. There are numberous
      mentions of sugar cookies in the old 'recipe books' and they all are
      based on creaming butter. It's not unthinkable that cakes might be
      made the same way.

      What about cream puffs? A croquembouche is decidedly elegant, and is
      based on puffs made from pate a choux, documented in 1540, invented
      by a chef Catherine de Medici took with her to France when she went
      to marry the duke of Orleans.
      http://www.heriot.co.uk/uploads/CROQUEMBOUCHENEW.JPG


      Hope this helps, I knew that culinary degree would come in handy!
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