Loading ...
Sorry, an error occurred while loading the content.

safflower was onionskin dyeing

Expand Messages
  • ranvaig@columbus.rr.com
    ... Safflower is a poor substitute for saffron in cooking, but Safflower is a period dye in its own right. It contains both a yellow and a red pigment and was
    Message 1 of 17 , Sep 3, 2005
    • 0 Attachment
      >
      >You can find saffron cheaper if you go to an ethnic grocer, BUT make
      >sure that what you are buying really is saffron. If it's "powdered
      >saffron" don't do it! And safflower petals are sometimes marketed
      >as "Azafran" as though they were saffron as well, and you won't get
      >nearly the same results.

      Safflower is a poor substitute for saffron in cooking, but Safflower
      is a period dye in its own right. It contains both a yellow and a
      red pigment and was usually processed to obtain the red dye. I've
      seen comments that it is not entirely lightfast, but I'm not sure if
      that is the red or the yellow. It also has been used as a cosmetic
      and food color.

      ranvaig
    • lilinah@earthlink.net
      ... Do you have any more info on safflower s use in cosmetics? I m especially interested in Southwest Asia (aka Middle East), South Asia, and Central Asia. --
      Message 2 of 17 , Sep 4, 2005
      • 0 Attachment
        ranvaig wrote:
        >Safflower is a poor substitute for saffron in cooking, but Safflower
        >is a period dye in its own right. It contains both a yellow and a
        >red pigment and was usually processed to obtain the red dye. I've
        >seen comments that it is not entirely lightfast, but I'm not sure if
        >that is the red or the yellow. It also has been used as a cosmetic
        >and food color.

        Do you have any more info on safflower's use in cosmetics? I'm
        especially interested in Southwest Asia (aka Middle East), South
        Asia, and Central Asia.
        --
        Urtatim (that's err-tah-TEEM)
        the persona formerly known as Anahita
      • kittencat3@aol.com
        Neither of the safflower dyes is lightfast. And it is a tremendous bother to process out the yellow dye to get the pink, especially when brazilwood produces
        Message 3 of 17 , Sep 4, 2005
        • 0 Attachment
          Neither of the safflower dyes is lightfast. And it is a tremendous bother to
          process out the yellow dye to get the pink, especially when brazilwood
          produces just about the same shades and is much more convenient to use.

          Sarah Davies


          [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
        • dona_violante
          ... bother to ... brazilwood ... use. ... Yeah but...it sounds like such fun to try! http://reconstructinghistory.com/japanese/safflower.html It s on my dyeing
          Message 4 of 17 , Sep 6, 2005
          • 0 Attachment
            > Neither of the safflower dyes is lightfast. And it is a tremendous
            bother to
            > process out the yellow dye to get the pink, especially when
            brazilwood
            > produces just about the same shades and is much more convenient to
            use.
            >

            Yeah but...it sounds like such fun to try!

            http://reconstructinghistory.com/japanese/safflower.html

            It's on my dyeing to-do list. But then, so are a lot of other
            dyes! ;)

            Cheers,
            Violante
            http://www.spanishpeacock.com/violante.htm
          Your message has been successfully submitted and would be delivered to recipients shortly.