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Re: Request Information on Doublet Point Spacing and Construction

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  • lilinah@earthlink.net
    ... Oh, yeah! The fact is, paintings are not photographs. Even in the Late Renaissance when they are often quite realistic, the artist does not generally do an
    Message 1 of 2 , Aug 31, 2005
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      David McDowell wrote:
      >1. I am attempting to add lacing strips to some doublets and slops,
      >mainly commercially made.
      >
      >2. Due to lack of time, and consistency with the existing garments, I
      >plan to use metal grommets.
      >
      >3. The only information I have seen on point spacing are the drawings
      >from Janet Arnold's Patterns of Fashion, which seem to indicate a row
      >of many (up to 62!) closely spaced holes.
      >
      >4. However, from period paintings it appears that a much smaller number
      >of points were actually used.

      Oh, yeah! The fact is, paintings are not photographs. Even in the
      Late Renaissance when they are often quite realistic, the artist does
      not generally do an absolute reproduction.

      I'll have to find the book, but in one book i have which collects
      various scholarly essays, there is one comparing a painting of
      Edward, the uh, uh, son of Henry the VIII, as a small child with the
      log of his wardrobe.

      The scholar matched up the painting with a garment she felt certain
      was the one represented. The actual garment was black with grey
      trim/piping - rather dull - the painted version was black with dark
      red trim - much more visually interesting. The actual garment had
      myriad holes for lacing - the painted version had far fewer, after
      all, they would have taken way too long to paint properly and would
      have interfered with the composition, noting here that a portrait
      painter would often have the set of clothes for the portrait to paint
      from - without a human occupant. The person portrayed would sit for
      limited amounts of time, enough for the painter to sketch their face
      - then add that into the painting.

      So it's hardly surprising that you find the actual garments have way
      more holes than any paintings show.

      I will see if i can find the book and give proper bibliographic references...
      --
      Urtatim (that's err-tah-TEEM)
      the persona formerly known as Anahita
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