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Re: onionskin dyeing WAS: dye, cheap and easy (in Jan. 2004)

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  • borderlands15213
    Joya, goldenrod will give you a very rich, golden yellow. It *is* food- grade, and as such is one dye you can use in your cooking utensils without fear of
    Message 1 of 13 , Aug 30, 2005
      Joya, goldenrod will give you a very rich, golden yellow. It *is* food-
      grade, and as such is one dye you can use in your cooking utensils
      without fear of poisoning yourself and your family (assuming you're not
      using a mordant, of course.)
      Not being a dyer myself, I don't know whether or not it requires a
      mordant on silk or wool.
      I also don't know for certain that the solidagos (lots of types of
      goldenrods out there) were known in Europe in period, nor whether the
      plant came to North America from Europe, or went to Europe from North
      America; I believe the latter was the case. A Google search turns up
      one of the varieties, at least, *solidago virgaurea,* as a common
      garden and wild plant in Europe, but that's *today.*
      Hopefully some of the more botanically versed gentles on this list can
      elucidate!
      Since this is the Authentic_SCA list, I'm assuming you do want this to
      be not only correct-for-period, but correct for your persona. If the
      arrival in Europe of goldenrod is too late for you...well, at least it
      doesn't smell like oninons. Best thought I could offer.

      Yseult the Gentle

      --- In Authentic_SCA@yahoogroups.com, "willo" <willolevin@y...> wrote:
      > --- In Authentic_SCA@yahoogroups.com, kittencat3@a... wrote:
      > > Warning on turmeric: IT IS NOT LIGHTFAST. It will bleach within a
      day if
      > > exposed to sunlight. And using a mordant makes zero
      difference. ...
      >
      > Oh, drat.
      >
      > Well then, I sure hope those onionskins don't stink too bad.
      >
      > (I've done Dharma's procion dyes in the past. I know a smidge about
      other dyes. I was
      > hoping for a quick, easy, and food-grade way to make a yellow veil
      for next weekend
      > without harassing my husband with onion odors.)
      >
      > --Joya
    • Susan B. Farmer
      ... Solidago virgaurea is not listed in Flora Europaea as being introduced. There are several species of Solidago listed in the flora.
      Message 2 of 13 , Aug 30, 2005
        Quoting borderlands15213 <borderlands15213@...>:

        > *snipage*

        > I also don't know for certain that the solidagos (lots of types of
        > goldenrods out there) were known in Europe in period, nor whether the
        > plant came to North America from Europe, or went to Europe from North
        > America; I believe the latter was the case. A Google search turns up
        > one of the varieties, at least, *solidago virgaurea,* as a common
        > garden and wild plant in Europe, but that's *today.*
        > Hopefully some of the more botanically versed gentles on this list can
        > elucidate!
        > Since this is the Authentic_SCA list, I'm assuming you do want this to
        >

        Solidago virgaurea is not listed in Flora Europaea as being introduced.
        There are several species of Solidago listed in the flora.

        <http://rbg-web2.rbge.org.uk/cgi-bin/nph-readbtree.pl/feout?FAMILY_XREF=&GENUS_XREF=Solidago>

        Jerusha, the Botanist
        -----
        Susan Farmer
        sfarmer@...
        University of Tennessee
        Department of Ecology and Evolutionary Biology
        http://www.goldsword.com/sfarmer/Trillium/
      • borderlands15213
        So does that mean that S. virgaurea would be a species native to Europe, and correct as a period dye-stuff? Many thanks! Yseult the Gentle, who isn t a
        Message 3 of 13 , Aug 31, 2005
          So does that mean that S. virgaurea would be a species native to
          Europe, and correct as a period dye-stuff?
          Many thanks!

          Yseult the Gentle, who isn't a botanist ;->


          --- In Authentic_SCA@yahoogroups.com, "Susan B. Farmer"
          <sfarmer@g...> wrote:
          > Quoting borderlands15213 <borderlands15213@y...>:
          >
          > > *snipage*
          >
          > > I also don't know for certain that the solidagos (lots of types of
          > > goldenrods out there) were known in Europe in period, nor whether
          the
          > > plant came to North America from Europe, or went to Europe from
          North
          > > America; I believe the latter was the case. A Google search
          turns up
          > > one of the varieties, at least, *solidago virgaurea,* as a common
          > > garden and wild plant in Europe, but that's *today.*
          > > Hopefully some of the more botanically versed gentles on this
          list can
          > > elucidate!
          > > Since this is the Authentic_SCA list, I'm assuming you do want
          this to
          > >
          >
          > Solidago virgaurea is not listed in Flora Europaea as being
          introduced.
          > There are several species of Solidago listed in the flora.
          >
          > <http://rbg-web2.rbge.org.uk/cgi-bin/nph-readbtree.pl/feout?
          FAMILY_XREF=&GENUS_XREF=Solidago>
          >
          > Jerusha, the Botanist
          > -----
          > Susan Farmer
          > sfarmer@g...
          > University of Tennessee
          > Department of Ecology and Evolutionary Biology
          > http://www.goldsword.com/sfarmer/Trillium/
        • Susan B. Farmer
          ... I checked with my Major Professor yesterday, and that is the only species of Solidago that is native to Europe. We gave them the rest of the species in
          Message 4 of 13 , Aug 31, 2005
            Quoting borderlands15213 <borderlands15213@...>:

            > So does that mean that S. virgaurea would be a species native to
            > Europe, and correct as a period dye-stuff?
            > Many thanks!
            >
            > Yseult the Gentle, who isn't a botanist ;->
            >

            I checked with my Major Professor yesterday, and that is the only
            species of Solidago that is native to Europe. We gave them the rest
            of the species in exchange for ground ivy, flea-bane and all those
            other lovely naturalized exotics. :-)

            Whether or not it can be used for dying is something that I have
            no knowledge of at this time. (It's on my list as soon as I
            graduate!)

            Jerusha
            -----
            Susan Farmer
            sfarmer@...
            University of Tennessee
            Department of Ecology and Evolutionary Biology
            http://www.goldsword.com/sfarmer/Trillium/
          • borderlands15213
            Thanks, Jerusha! Yseult
            Message 5 of 13 , Aug 31, 2005
              Thanks, Jerusha!
              Yseult

              --- In Authentic_SCA@yahoogroups.com, "Susan B. Farmer"
              <sfarmer@g...> wrote:
              > Quoting borderlands15213 <borderlands15213@y...>:
              >
              > > So does that mean that S. virgaurea would be a species native to
              > > Europe, and correct as a period dye-stuff?
              > > Many thanks!
              > >
              > > Yseult the Gentle, who isn't a botanist ;->
              > >
              >
              > I checked with my Major Professor yesterday, and that is the only
              > species of Solidago that is native to Europe. We gave them the rest
              > of the species in exchange for ground ivy, flea-bane and all those
              > other lovely naturalized exotics. :-)
              >
              > Whether or not it can be used for dying is something that I have
              > no knowledge of at this time. (It's on my list as soon as I
              > graduate!)
              >
              > Jerusha
              > -----
              > Susan Farmer
              > sfarmer@g...
              > University of Tennessee
              > Department of Ecology and Evolutionary Biology
              > http://www.goldsword.com/sfarmer/Trillium/
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