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Re: [Authentic_SCA] Uniforms? (was Hurley)

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  • Tiffany Brown
    This reminds me of the chanson of roland. The armies cry out the agreed upon war cry to tell each other apart, as far as i can tell. (they might also have had
    Message 1 of 6 , Aug 28, 2005
      This reminds me of the chanson of roland. The armies cry out the
      agreed upon war cry to tell each other apart, as far as i can tell.
      (they might also have had some livery, but with many armies grouping
      together per side, you couldn't necessarily remmeber who had just
      changed sides)

      I wonder if somethign like that could work on a game field. You hear
      a call of your team name behind you and throw there. Depends upon
      some honesty from the team members, but might work.

      Teffania

      On 8/28/05, Cannoneer <cannoneer@...> wrote:
      > At 12:27 PM 8/26/2005, you wrote:
      > >I find it hard to believe that it was a post period concept.
      > >In the confusion of battle, with hundreds if not thousands
      > >to a side, how did medieval armies determine who was the enemy
      > >and not a conscript from the next village?
      > >Without researching the subject, I believe the Templars, Hospitilars
      > >and other Chivalric Orders wore matching tabbards.
      > >The practice of keeping servants "In Livery" was common in the 16th
      > >century. Jews were forced to wear identifying garments though out our
      > >period. I also recall apprentice guilds wore "colors" and had
      > >street brawls late period...
      > >Why do we assume that uniforms were a foreign concept for team sport or
      > >military use?
      > >Ercole the curious
      >
      > Tabards were common, probably the most common 'uniform'- that is something
      > marking you to a particular lord's service. These were more for permanent
      > retainers or soldiers, though. For levies, or short term conscripts, field
      > signs were common. A particular flower or bunch of leaves worn in the hat
      > or pinned to the jerkin was common. The other most common was a length of
      > cloth of a particular colour tied about the upper arm. There are also a
      > number of instances where opposing armies chose the same field sign, then
      > met on the field. Confusion for both sides.
      >
      > Hawkyns
      >
      >
      > Roderic Hawkyns
      > Master Gunner
      >
      > Artillery lends dignity to what might otherwise be a vulgar brawl
      >
      > Its like I always say, you get more with a kind word and a two-by-four then
      > with just a two-by-four - Marcus Cole
      >
      >
      >
      >
      >
      >
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