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Re: Alternative Fencing Garb

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  • dparishwhittaker
    ... to ... Well, if you were a late 16th century Western European male (not just English), you probably wore some sort of breeches (slops, venetians,
    Message 1 of 3 , Aug 28, 2005
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      --- In Authentic_SCA@yahoogroups.com, "Marc Lauterbach" <mllaut@w...>
      wrote:
      >The first and by far most popular
      > (afaict) is the Elizabethan school: doublet (sleeveless, but that's
      > another matter), slops <snip>
      >In any case, while this is
      > all well and good, I find that this tendancy in garb tends to lead
      to
      > a universal "English" look. \

      Well, if you were a late 16th century Western European male (not just
      English), you probably wore some sort of breeches (slops, venetians,
      trunkhose, etc) and a doublet (which would probably have sleeves,
      btw). But you can get exotic enough with that. Think pluderhosen-

      http://www.thehaca.com/pdf/jm7.htm
      (From Meyer, 1570)

      You might have worn various types of coats over that- a mandillion
      might be nice, would protect you on the lists, and you can "cheat"
      and not wear a doublet under it.

      Of course, this is SCA, so if you want to dress up like a Breughal
      peasant, go ahead. Time period isn't too far off, although I doubt
      you would be able to afford a rapier. But don't let your chosen
      portrayal keep you from studying swordsmanship.

      Oh yeah, you've got to take that "fencing is late 17th century" stuff
      with a grain of salt. SCA rules permit the use of reproduction Del
      Tins that are perfectly good replicas of late 16th century blades. As
      far as technique goes, by the end of the 16th century, rapier fencing
      had become mostly thrust oriented. If you look at the first decade
      or so of the 17th, Giganti, Fabris and Capo Ferro were all preaching
      a style of thrust oriented combat, complete with lunges. Of course
      they also used cuts, which translate poorly to draw/tip cuts in the
      lists. But, again, the primary attack was a thrust.

      On the other hand, if you use modern fencing technique with an epee
      or short schlager, yeah what you're doing is closer to late 17th
      century smallsword at the earliest. I personally don't have a
      problem with that (I dig the Restoration), but it is officially OOP.

      -David Whitaker, circa 1594 Northumberland Bounder with a rapier he
      can't afford.
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