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Sports Uniforms (was: Hurley)

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  • Sharon L. Krossa
    ... But why do this if medievals playing the game didn t do this? They didn t have any extra ability to recognize friends from strangers, or remember which
    Message 1 of 32 , Aug 27, 2005
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      At 4:51 AM -0700 8/27/05, Joannah Hansen wrote:
      >Um... A simple solution and very similar to the medieval practice of
      >giving favours - *armbands* to distinguish the teams. ? Even then,
      >in the heat of the moment, they could be missed by team-mates. And
      >they could have been made of scraps/rags, thus not expensive.

      But why do this if medievals playing the game didn't do this?

      They didn't have any extra ability to recognize friends from
      strangers, or remember which friends were on their team and which
      were on the other (without added visual markers), than we do
      modernly. If they played the game without special visual markers
      distinguishing teams, then we can play the game without special
      visual markers distinguishing teams.

      One of the most difficult things in historical re-creation is letting
      go of our modern assumptions about what is necessary -- not only
      assumptions about _how_ certain problems must have been solved, but
      assumptions that the problem must have been solved, or, indeed, was
      even considered a problem to be solved (rather than simply The Way
      Things Were, warts and all).

      Often on this list people talk of the SCA as a place where one can do
      a little experimental archeology -- well, this is a good example of
      such an opportunity. If we introduce modern approaches to modernly
      perceived problems, we miss the opportunity to perhaps discover how
      medievals managed to do without what we're assuming is necessary.

      Really it comes down to this: are we trying to re-create the
      experience of modern sport wearing medieval clothes, or are we trying
      to re-create the experience of medieval sport?

      Aiffric

      PS I should perhaps mention that I have played shinty, a close cousin
      of hurley, with historical re-creators where no added visual markers
      were used to distinguish teams, and where almost everybody in the
      game knew everyone else fairly well -- and the teams were picked
      immediately prior to the game, to boot. Added visual markers
      certainly would have made it easier to recognize friend from foe
      quickly, but they weren't necessary to play the game. For that
      matter, modernly as a child I frequently played soccer without any
      added visual marker being used to tell one side from the other --
      primarily during soccer team practices -- and while we made more
      mistakes about who was on our side than we did when playing official
      matches in uniform, again such added visual markers were not
      necessary to play the game.
      --
      Sharon Krossa, skrossa-ml@...
      Resources for Scottish history, names, clothing, language & more:
      Medieval Scotland - http://MedievalScotland.org/
    • Sharon L. Krossa
      ... But why do this if medievals playing the game didn t do this? They didn t have any extra ability to recognize friends from strangers, or remember which
      Message 32 of 32 , Aug 27, 2005
      • 0 Attachment
        At 4:51 AM -0700 8/27/05, Joannah Hansen wrote:
        >Um... A simple solution and very similar to the medieval practice of
        >giving favours - *armbands* to distinguish the teams. ? Even then,
        >in the heat of the moment, they could be missed by team-mates. And
        >they could have been made of scraps/rags, thus not expensive.

        But why do this if medievals playing the game didn't do this?

        They didn't have any extra ability to recognize friends from
        strangers, or remember which friends were on their team and which
        were on the other (without added visual markers), than we do
        modernly. If they played the game without special visual markers
        distinguishing teams, then we can play the game without special
        visual markers distinguishing teams.

        One of the most difficult things in historical re-creation is letting
        go of our modern assumptions about what is necessary -- not only
        assumptions about _how_ certain problems must have been solved, but
        assumptions that the problem must have been solved, or, indeed, was
        even considered a problem to be solved (rather than simply The Way
        Things Were, warts and all).

        Often on this list people talk of the SCA as a place where one can do
        a little experimental archeology -- well, this is a good example of
        such an opportunity. If we introduce modern approaches to modernly
        perceived problems, we miss the opportunity to perhaps discover how
        medievals managed to do without what we're assuming is necessary.

        Really it comes down to this: are we trying to re-create the
        experience of modern sport wearing medieval clothes, or are we trying
        to re-create the experience of medieval sport?

        Aiffric

        PS I should perhaps mention that I have played shinty, a close cousin
        of hurley, with historical re-creators where no added visual markers
        were used to distinguish teams, and where almost everybody in the
        game knew everyone else fairly well -- and the teams were picked
        immediately prior to the game, to boot. Added visual markers
        certainly would have made it easier to recognize friend from foe
        quickly, but they weren't necessary to play the game. For that
        matter, modernly as a child I frequently played soccer without any
        added visual marker being used to tell one side from the other --
        primarily during soccer team practices -- and while we made more
        mistakes about who was on our side than we did when playing official
        matches in uniform, again such added visual markers were not
        necessary to play the game.
        --
        Sharon Krossa, skrossa-ml@...
        Resources for Scottish history, names, clothing, language & more:
        Medieval Scotland - http://MedievalScotland.org/
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