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Re: 14th Century Ladies Hose

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  • Melissa
    ... Thanks so much! and if you don t mind maybe answerng one more question....what is fulled wool :D -Elspeth
    Message 1 of 8 , Jul 31, 2005
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      --- In Authentic_SCA@yahoogroups.com, "bex_1014" <tonkin.rebecca@s...>
      wrote:
      > Hi: If you look on
      > http://katerina.purplefiles.net/
      > under "Research Articles" there is a page on stockings/hose etc that is
      > very useful.
      > I use a strip of fulled wool selvedge for my garters - it works very
      > well.
      > Collette

      Thanks so much! and if you don't mind maybe answerng one more
      question....what is "fulled" wool :D

      -Elspeth
    • Heather M
      ... Kass McGann s Hosen patterns (at http://www.reconstructinghistory.com) don t seem bad at all. I ll be using them for some knee-high hosen for my for an
      Message 2 of 8 , Aug 1, 2005
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        Melissa wrote:

        > Anyone have any patterns or websites on womens hose? I have some nice
        > linen here that would like to be on my feet. I've seen some linen hose
        > sold on SCA-esque websites, so I assume that's ok.
        >
        > Also, what kind of material was used for garters? I don't have access
        > to tablet weaving right now, if that's appropriate (but i am
        > interested in learning once I get the chance :D) but would other
        > fabric be ok for now? I do want to be authentic as possible!
        >
        > Any help would be very appreciated!
        >
        > -Elspeth
        >
        > p.s. if anyone has pictures of themselves in those hose, that'd be
        > great too!

        Kass McGann's Hosen patterns (at http://www.reconstructinghistory.com)
        don't seem bad at all. I'll be using them for some knee-high hosen for
        my for an earlier period outfit I've got and am gradually improving. Her
        research seems solid, her directions seem nice and clear, and she
        includes alterations according to the time frame you're going for. These
        are NOT joined hosen, but you can get a set of chausses out of it. She
        even includes directions for altering for larger sizes than she's got on
        the tissue.

        In addition, the article on hosen from the book for the Known World
        Academy of Rapier (or Defence, I need to check w/ my hubby and it's
        before coffee) from a couple of years back is very nice, and covers
        hosen from as far back as we can go with evidence to the joined hose of
        late period.

        Margaret Northwode, whose hubby will look *really* great in those joined
        hose - mmmm, fencer's legs.
      • Heather M
        ... Wool that s been heat-moisture-and-friction treated to felt up a bit. Really ideal for garb - and she s nailed it on the garters usage. To full your wool,
        Message 3 of 8 , Aug 1, 2005
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          Melissa wrote:

          > --- In Authentic_SCA@yahoogroups.com, "bex_1014" <tonkin.rebecca@s...>
          > wrote:
          > > Hi: If you look on
          > > http://katerina.purplefiles.net/
          > > under "Research Articles" there is a page on stockings/hose etc that is
          > > very useful.
          > > I use a strip of fulled wool selvedge for my garters - it works very
          > > well.
          > > Collette
          >
          > Thanks so much! and if you don't mind maybe answerng one more
          > question....what is "fulled" wool :D
          >
          > -Elspeth

          Wool that's been heat-moisture-and-friction treated to felt up a bit.
          Really ideal for garb - and she's nailed it on the garters usage. To
          full your wool, take your yardage, wash it in the washer in cold or
          warm wash cool rinse water only using shampoo - I like baby shampoo, as
          it comes out really nice and soft. Then pop it in the dryer on the
          lowest setting - No Heat, or Air Only is an ideal setting. For the rest
          of the life of the piece, wash in cold water wash and rinse only, and
          either air dry or dry on no heat. You'll get some significant shrinkage,
          but not as much as if you'd truly felted it - washed it in hot water and
          threw it in the dryer on high heat. My hubby did that with a length of
          bright red wool. I think it was about three yards, and he ended up with
          maybe one yard for a final result, when he'd really, really meant to
          full it.

          Felted wool works just as well as a garter as fulled wool, IMHO. I've
          used both, with pretty equivalent results.

          Margaret Northwode, Evangelist of the Holy Fabric Trinity
        • bex_1014
          ... very ... Hi: A number of people have replied, but I will add my bit: when I speak of fulled wool, I mean wool cloth that has been exposed to some degree of
          Message 4 of 8 , Aug 1, 2005
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            --- In Authentic_SCA@yahoogroups.com, "Melissa"
            <princessbunny99@g...> wrote:

            > > I use a strip of fulled wool selvedge for my garters - it works
            very
            > > well.
            > > Collette
            >
            > Thanks so much! and if you don't mind maybe answerng one more
            > question....what is "fulled" wool :D
            >
            > -Elspeth

            Hi:
            A number of people have replied, but I will add my bit:
            when I speak of fulled wool, I mean wool cloth that has been exposed
            to some degree of water, agitation, and soap or detergent, possibly
            also including heat. This causes loose wool fibres in the cloth to
            latch on to each other and lock on, resulting on a firmer cloth. The
            degree to which this happens depends on a number of factors,
            including the type of sheep, wool type, any processing done in the
            plant, the weave of the cloth, degree of agitation, water
            temperature, etc.
            When I full my cloth, I generally throw it in the washer on hot (with
            soap), cold rinse, and line dry.
            A tight smooth weave with worsted wool generally doesn't have many
            loose fibres to catch with, so you get a slightly fuzzy, slightly
            smaller piece of cloth, which is lovely to wear.
            If you have a loose-weave cloth with a loosely-spun thread and wash
            it in hot water and tumble-dry, you may well end up with what is the
            equivalent of felt.
            When I speak of felting, I mean using wool fleece that is spread out
            into layers and those layers pounded together using heat, water &
            soap/detergent. This produces the kind of felt they use for hats or
            shoes.
            Now, I have been told that some people - particularly weavers - have
            specific terminology for 2 types of cloth processing. For them,
            fulling uses gentle action on cloth, with no or very little heat.
            Felting uses cloth still, but hot water and more pounding to really
            lock the fibres together.
            So depending on who you talk to, you may get slightly different
            meanings.
            In case you are wondering, my garters were made from a strip of
            worsted wool selvedge about an inch wide (scrap left over from a
            dress) that had been through a hot wash three times (because I don't
            like the smell of lavender wool wash) and was finished shrinking.
            They are slightly stretchy - enough to allow circulation once tightly
            tied, but they don't slip, and they don't let the hose sag. Being so
            well fulled (or felted, if you're using definition set 2), they don't
            fray either, even though I have no finishing on the edge at all.
            Incidentally, the selvedge part of the strip has a nice ripple along
            it remarkably similar to some of the presumed garters in the Museum
            of London book (can't remember whether it's Dress Accessories or
            Textiles).
            HTH
            Collette
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