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Re: Wooden Wheels?

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  • ericarchambault@juno.com
    Try your local mega hardware store. Home Depot has had them in the garden center. Harbor Freight has also had them. They were reasonably priced, but could
    Message 1 of 3 , Jul 27, 2005
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      Try your local mega hardware store.
      Home Depot has had them in the garden center.
      Harbor Freight has also had them.

      They were reasonably priced, but could
      probabally use some good glue soaked into
      the spoke joints.


      YiS,
      Ercole

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    • gedney@OPTONLINE.NET
      ... I would strongly recommend against using wheels of this sort for any wagons that actually have to GO anywhere (as opposed to simply being propped up in a
      Message 2 of 3 , Jul 27, 2005
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        > Try your local mega hardware store.
        > Home Depot has had them in the garden center.
        > Harbor Freight has also had them.

        I would strongly recommend against using wheels of this sort for any wagons that actually have to GO anywhere (as opposed to simply being propped up in a corner of the garden as a decorative acccent).
        It will be a bad experience.

        These are usually strictly decorative, of soft woods and poor construction.
        the hubs are thin, usually as thin as the rims, which means that they are going to wobble and tilt and wear unevenly in very short order. They'll bind and they'll break, and nobody will be happy about em. Woods like cedar are often used because the weather rapidly to a nice antique looking grey in the garden.

        The hubs on proper wood wheels are usually a hardwood such as elm or ash, and much thicker than the wheel rims to provide extra bearing surface to keep wear spread our over a larger area, and a wide support to prevent the wheel from tilting and thus wearing unevenly and rapidly.
        Even the ca 900's Oseberg cart had extremely large hubs for the size wheels.
        The hubs were almost as large horizontally as the wheels were tall!

        Take the plunge and get or make wheels with large hardwood hubs.


        Capt Elias
        Dragonship Haven, East
        (Stratford, CT, USA)

        -Renaissance Geek of the Cyber Seas

        - Help! I am being pecked to death by the Ducks of Dilletanteism!
        There are SO damn many more things I want to try in the SCA
        than I can possibly have time for. It's killing me!!!

        -------------------------------------------------------------
        Upon the hempen tackle ship-boys climbing;
        Hear the shrill whistle which doth order give
        To sounds confused; behold the threaden sails,
        Borne with the invisible and creeping wind,
        Draw the huge bottoms through the furrow'd sea,
        Breasting the lofty surge: O, do but think
        You stand upon the ravage and behold
        A city on the inconstant billows dancing;
        For so appears this fleet majestical,
        Holding due course to Harfleur.
        - Shakespeare - Henry V, Act III, Prologue
      • msgilliandurham
        My thanks for the responses -- however, I m looking for *solid* wooden wheels, not wheels with spokes. 10 or 12 circles of wood, about 2 thick, with a hole
        Message 3 of 3 , Jul 27, 2005
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          My thanks for the responses -- however, I'm looking for *solid* wooden
          wheels, not wheels with spokes.

          10" or 12" circles of wood, about 2" thick, with a hole in the
          middle :-)

          Thanks anyway -- Gillian Durham
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