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Weather in Europe (was Hiding Coolers? and Using chests as tables?)

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  • Marc Carlson
    ... Which is why New York (city at least) could be historically really miserable in August. In shoemaking history, there was a sort of wax that is used that
    Message 1 of 54 , Jul 1, 2005
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      --- In Authentic_SCA@yahoogroups.com, "CaelaL" <ecombs79@h...> wrote:
      > ...On the other hand, in medieval times the weather in Europe was
      > cooler and in Texas cheese melts unless it's on ice. Also, Spain and
      > Greece are alot farther north than many realize. Spain is on the
      > same parrallel as New York with a similar climate.

      Which is why New York (city at least) could be historically really
      miserable in August.

      In shoemaking history, there was a sort of wax that is used that has a
      very low melting point, and is very sticky and nasty when melted - but
      it needs to be for sewing (long story). That's why it was stored in
      water in the summer (and in the shoemakers armpit in the winter :) ).

      The real question is the continual repetition of the "Europe was
      cooler" thing. That really depends on when you are talking about and
      comparing it to, and simple annual variation. Before the "Little Ice
      Age" started around 1300 there was the "Medieval Warm Period" during
      which temperatures more closely resembled the middle 20th century.
      Even then, with the exception of brief periods in the the
      mid/late-1300s and late 1400s, the temperatures in the "Little Ice
      Age" weren't generally that much colder (we're talking yearly averages
      here) of fractions of a degree (C) than they were for most of the 20th
      century.

      Is it overall warmer today than it was then -- absolutely. We have
      far more warmer days every year than cooler ones. But I think that
      the whole things were cooler then may still be somewhat misleading
      (and is frequently used as an excuse not to bother with authenticity).

      Marc/Diarmaid
    • Andrea Huwydd Lycsenbwrg
      A few random thoughts on fish days.... It isn t actually necessary to assume that because today is a Friday in 2005, it corresponds to Friday in 1275 or
      Message 54 of 54 , Jul 9, 2005
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        A few random thoughts on fish days....

        It isn't actually necessary to assume that because
        today is a Friday in 2005, it corresponds to Friday in
        1275 or whatever (in fact, because of the calendar
        issues, it probably doesn't....)

        When did Saturday become a day of abstinence in the
        West? In the early Church, Wednesday and Friday were
        the fast days, as they still are in the Orthodox
        Church. So whether you abstain from meat on Saturday
        depends not only on where in Europe but when.

        Was a fast day counted from midnight to midnight, as
        now, or from Vespers or sundown the night before?

        A pious Christian should not have been attending a
        party during Lent (or the Nativity or Pentecost fasts)
        anyhow. If he did, though, the hospitality rule would
        supercede the fasting: you eat what you are served,
        not put the host to extra trouble to accommodate your
        fasting. And if you happen to be the host, and others
        in your party are not fasting,well, interpretations
        vary. Ask your priest. And then too, if you were
        travelling the fasting requirements would be relaxed
        to some extent.

        --- msgilliandurham <msgilliandurham@...> wrote:

        >
        > Dairy products and eggs, as far as I can figure out,
        > were allowed
        > on "fish days" except in Lent, and maybe Advent. I'm
        > still trying to
        > figure that out -- anybody have a good source?

        I believe that is correct for Western Europe in later
        period, based on the recipes for "tarts in Ember Day"
        which include eggs and dairy. (Ember days by
        definition fall on Wednesday, Friday and Saturday.) I
        seem also to recall references in cookbooks to "fish
        days not in Lent" which imply that eggs and dairy
        would be acceptable.

        So there are plenty of ways not to fast during events
        while being a pious and observant medieval Roman
        Catholic. (Or Eastern Orthodox.) If you need to
        observe the fasting regulations mundanely, well,
        that's beyond the limits of this list, although I
        would be interested in discussing it offlist with
        anyone who has dealt with the issue.

        That said, an authentic Ember Day feast would be a lot
        of fun, at least once.

        Andrea








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