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Hiding Coolers? and Using chests as tables?

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  • msgilliandurham
    Frequently the advice is given, that if you can t build a wooden box for your cooler, it s sufficient to throw a cloth over your plastic cooler to disguise it.
    Message 1 of 54 , Jun 30, 2005
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      Frequently the advice is given, that if you can't build a wooden box
      for your cooler, it's sufficient to throw a cloth over your plastic
      cooler to disguise it.

      Am I the only one to whom this arrangement looks blatently like a
      mundane cooler with a cloth thrown over it?

      I'm thinking it's the dimentions.

      I know there are many pictures of tall (dining-table height) tables
      with floor-length cloths on them, but I can't think of one example
      of a short chest covered with a floor length cloth. Thick rugs, or
      thin cushions, on the *lid* only, for seating, but not what is in
      essence a tablecloth. Does anyone here know of any documentation for
      this?

      This brings me to two branching lines of thought:

      1) If indeed, there is no documentation for covering chests (hutches,
      boxes, whatever) with floor length cloths, a much better disguise
      for a a mundane cooler would be to keep the cooler under a table
      covered with a floor length cloth, yes? (Assuming you have a table,
      of course.)

      2) Is there any documentation for the use of chests as tables? I know
      we do it all the time, but can it be documented? For that matter, is
      there any documentation for the existance of short (15-18" from the
      floor) tables? It's a royal pain in the [insert portion of anatomy of
      your choice] to have to clear everything off the top of a chest with
      a hinged lid, to get to the things inside it -- I'm wondering if this
      is a documentable use of a chest?

      The only pictures that come to my mind, of a grouping of a chair, or
      two chairs, with a surface between them, is of a chair, or chairs,
      with a table that's about the height of the arms of the chair(s). I
      can't think of a picture of a chair or chairs with a low chest
      between them.

      Any thought on these subjects from the list?

      Thanks, Gillian
    • Andrea Huwydd Lycsenbwrg
      A few random thoughts on fish days.... It isn t actually necessary to assume that because today is a Friday in 2005, it corresponds to Friday in 1275 or
      Message 54 of 54 , Jul 9 10:12 AM
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        A few random thoughts on fish days....

        It isn't actually necessary to assume that because
        today is a Friday in 2005, it corresponds to Friday in
        1275 or whatever (in fact, because of the calendar
        issues, it probably doesn't....)

        When did Saturday become a day of abstinence in the
        West? In the early Church, Wednesday and Friday were
        the fast days, as they still are in the Orthodox
        Church. So whether you abstain from meat on Saturday
        depends not only on where in Europe but when.

        Was a fast day counted from midnight to midnight, as
        now, or from Vespers or sundown the night before?

        A pious Christian should not have been attending a
        party during Lent (or the Nativity or Pentecost fasts)
        anyhow. If he did, though, the hospitality rule would
        supercede the fasting: you eat what you are served,
        not put the host to extra trouble to accommodate your
        fasting. And if you happen to be the host, and others
        in your party are not fasting,well, interpretations
        vary. Ask your priest. And then too, if you were
        travelling the fasting requirements would be relaxed
        to some extent.

        --- msgilliandurham <msgilliandurham@...> wrote:

        >
        > Dairy products and eggs, as far as I can figure out,
        > were allowed
        > on "fish days" except in Lent, and maybe Advent. I'm
        > still trying to
        > figure that out -- anybody have a good source?

        I believe that is correct for Western Europe in later
        period, based on the recipes for "tarts in Ember Day"
        which include eggs and dairy. (Ember days by
        definition fall on Wednesday, Friday and Saturday.) I
        seem also to recall references in cookbooks to "fish
        days not in Lent" which imply that eggs and dairy
        would be acceptable.

        So there are plenty of ways not to fast during events
        while being a pious and observant medieval Roman
        Catholic. (Or Eastern Orthodox.) If you need to
        observe the fasting regulations mundanely, well,
        that's beyond the limits of this list, although I
        would be interested in discussing it offlist with
        anyone who has dealt with the issue.

        That said, an authentic Ember Day feast would be a lot
        of fun, at least once.

        Andrea








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