Loading ...
Sorry, an error occurred while loading the content.

Re: Reed "boning" washable? WAS English jacket

Expand Messages
  • Kass McGann
    ... I honestly couldn t say as I ve never had to wash any of my boned garments. And I wear the 18th century stays quite heavily. Lemme explain. Number one,
    Message 1 of 41 , Apr 4, 2005
    • 0 Attachment
      --- In Authentic_SCA@yahoogroups.com, "msgilliandurham"
      <msgilliandurham@y...> wrote:
      > Conversely, how does the caning hold up in washable garb, please?

      I honestly couldn't say as I've never had to wash any of my boned
      garments. And I wear the 18th century stays quite heavily.

      Lemme explain. Number one, your shift protects your stays from getting
      dirty from sweat and bodily oils. Number two, the lining of the stays
      is only slip-stitched to the stays at the interior seams. So you can
      remove this and either wash it or discard it when it's too dirty. I've
      had my stays for 3 1/2 years and I haven't replaced my lining yet. But
      this is what people in the 18th century did when their linings got
      dirty. So if mine ever shows signs of soil, I will replace it. That's
      the whole reason why it's just slip-stitched at the seams and not sewn
      in with the boning like the other layers. =)

      Now, that being said, this is information from the 18th century, not
      the 16th. We only have two sets of extant 16th century bodys and
      neither of them have slip-stitched linings (and neither do my replicas
      of them). But the men's doublets do! So if you're very concerned
      about your bodys and other boned garments getting dirty from the
      inside, slip-stitch you lining in and then wash that when it needs it.
      But as I said, I've been wearing my shift under my stays for 3 1/2
      years of monthly wear (dancing, serving food, 100 degree heat...) and
      my stays have never needed a wash yet. =)

      For dirt on the outside of garments, I just spot clean.

      I've also been told that you can hand wash garments boned with reeds.
      I have never done it personally, but the routine goes like this: fill
      a shallow basin with warm water and a mild detergent; submerse your
      boned garment; swish a bit; dry flat.

      > Thanks for all your help with this issue, Kass -- it's not having to
      > reinvent the wheel for every garment one makes, that makes it
      possible
      > for many of us to make accurate clothing.

      Woo HOO! And I'm all for that, Gillian! Glad ot have been of help.

      Kass
    • ladynorelle
      I had a sneaky suspition that s what we were talking about. I have, oh, maybe twenty pounds of the stuff laying around my house right this minute. Having never
      Message 41 of 41 , Apr 7, 2005
      • 0 Attachment
        I had a sneaky suspition that's what we were talking about. I have,
        oh, maybe twenty pounds of the stuff laying around my house right
        this minute. Having never made anything with boning, I'm only
        guessing here, but I would think you'd have lots and lots left over
        from the coil when you were done. When you do decide to break down
        and buy some, let me know. I can either just mail you some that I
        have (if I have the right size at the right time) or direct you to
        one of my online suppliers, where you'll save some cash.

        Norelle, whose eyes always bug out of her head when she see anyone
        selling/buying reed for more than six bucks a pound


        >
        > See www.caning.com. Kass said she used the 1mm in bunches for one
        > corset, and 2 lengths of 1/4" split for another.
        >
        > My calculations indicate that the 1/4 part of the narrow foot om my
        > sewing machine will make channels which will hold a 5/32 diameter
        > cane, (doing this from memory, I think that's right) so that's
        > probably what I'll be getting.
        >
        > Gillian (who really needs to quit using purchases as an excuse for
        > not getting off *her* lazy rear, and start *making* something)
        Durham
      Your message has been successfully submitted and would be delivered to recipients shortly.