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Re: [Authentic_SCA] Drawnwork coif

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  • lilinah@earthlink.net
    ... I ve noticed that in some historical needlework techniques, a single term can be used by different authors to mean different techniques. Technique One: no
    Message 1 of 9 , Mar 31, 2005
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      "Kass McGann" <historian@...> wrote:
      >I've posted these three photos of a drawnwork coif in the Royal
      >Museum of Scotland in Edinburgh (photos scanned from pg 205 in QEWU
      >
      >...I'm trying to figure out how this is
      >drawnwork. I'm seeing a lot of buttonhole stitch like you do in
      >punto in aria and reticello. But I don't see where the threads are
      >drawn out.
      >
      >However, in the close-ups, it is pretty obvious that the areas
      >decorated with blackwork (that aren't drawnwork) are contiguous with
      >the fabric of the drawnwork part. I'm just trying to figure out
      >what's going on here.
      >
      >Or are they calling it "drawnwork" but we would really call
      >it "cutwork" (or did I just make up a word)?

      I've noticed that in some historical needlework techniques, a single
      term can be used by different authors to mean different techniques.

      Technique One: no threads are removed, but the travelling embroidery
      thread pulls or draws threads in the ground fabric out of alignment
      to make lacey holes. I've seen this technique called drawn work or
      pulled work.

      In Technique Two, a few threads in the ground fabric, sometimes just
      warp, sometimes just weft, sometimes both, are snipped and drawn or
      pulled out of their place - sometimes for just a short distance,
      sometimes for long distances. Then the needleworker can pull or draw
      the remaining threads of the ground fabric into different alignments,
      or even make reticella in open square areas. I've seen this technique
      called drawn work or pulled work.

      In Technique Three, whole regions of ground cloth threads are cut and
      removed and a variety of different possible needlework techniques can
      be used to finish the edges and/or fill the holes. What i've seen
      called cutwork is a little more "free form" than the work on this
      coif.

      Looks to me like it might be a combo of One and Two... but there sure
      are butt-loads of buttonhole stitches!

      Are there other photos in the book that are captioned using the term
      "drawnwork" where the technique is easier to see? This might clarify
      what meaning Arnold gives the term.

      --
      Urtatim, formerly Anahita
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