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Book reviews?

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  • Saerlaith ingen Ruadan
    Anyone know anything about these two books? I ve done a lot of research on early Irish stuff, but just found the first book in a biblio on a weird Celtic site.
    Message 1 of 10 , Mar 14, 2005
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      Anyone know anything about these two books? I've done a lot of research on
      early Irish stuff, but just found the first book in a biblio on a weird
      Celtic site. The 2nd book a friend thought I might like, and it has good
      reviews. I'm looking for info on everyday farm life and work, especially
      pre-1000CE.

      http://www.celt.dias.ie/publications/cat/f/f4-4.html Early Irish Farming by
      Fergus Kelly

      http://www.amazon.com/exec/obidos/tg/detail/-/0394510364 Lost country life
      by Dorothy Hartley

      Thanks!
      Saerlaith
    • Heather Rose Jones
      ... Fergus Kelly is a professor at the Dublin Institute for Advanced Studies and a rather well-known expert on early Irish law. (He also happens to be the
      Message 2 of 10 , Mar 14, 2005
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        At 9:48 PM -0800 3/14/05, Saerlaith ingen Ruadan wrote:
        >Anyone know anything about these two books? I've done a lot of research on
        >early Irish stuff, but just found the first book in a biblio on a weird
        >Celtic site. The 2nd book a friend thought I might like, and it has good
        >reviews. I'm looking for info on everyday farm life and work, especially
        >pre-1000CE.
        >
        >http://www.celt.dias.ie/publications/cat/f/f4-4.html Early Irish Farming by
        >Fergus Kelly


        Fergus Kelly is a professor at the Dublin Institute for Advanced
        Studies and a rather well-known expert on early Irish law. (He also
        happens to be the keynote speaker this weekend at the Celtic Studies
        conference at U.C. Berkeley.) There's a complete list of his
        publications at <http://www.celt.dias.ie/english/staff/fkelly.html>.

        You can't really blame him if odd web sites mention his stuff.


        >http://www.amazon.com/exec/obidos/tg/detail/-/0394510364 Lost country life
        >by Dorothy Hartley

        This book is based around Thomas Tusser's mid 16th century books on
        husbandry and agriculture, using them as a stepping-off place for
        discussions on 16th c. English rural economy and society. Hartley's
        book is also very entertainingly written and aimed at a popular
        rather than academic audience.

        Tangwystyl
        --
        ****
        Heather Rose Jones
        heather.jones@...
        ****
      • Andrea Huwydd Lycsenbwrg
        ... http://www.amazon.com/exec/obidos/tg/detail/-/0394510364 ... Wonderful resource! A wealth of detail for late period farm life. Andrea
        Message 3 of 10 , Mar 15, 2005
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          --- Saerlaith ingen Ruadan <barknark@...> wrote:
          >
          >
          http://www.amazon.com/exec/obidos/tg/detail/-/0394510364
          > Lost country life
          > by Dorothy Hartley

          Wonderful resource! A wealth of detail for late
          period farm life.

          Andrea

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        • John Gibson
          OK I ve done confused myself, so I would like to ask here. Approximately 1550 ~ 1570 English Male Garb; Name the layers from the skin out. (Pattern
          Message 4 of 10 , Mar 16, 2005
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            OK I've done confused myself, so I would like to ask here. Approximately
            1550 ~ 1570 English Male Garb; Name the layers from the skin out. (Pattern
            suggestions welcome.) I'm finally at that point where I have enough event
            garb that I am willing to devote a year plus into a full period outfit.
            Since a year is a long time, I want to do it right as I can (Then I'll have
            to improve on the next one, but I still remember my very first outfit which
            is hid from light for me to look at anytime I get discouraged or uppity).
            Anyway, the two real problems I keep encountering are patterns, and a
            definitive list of layers.

            Lord John Gilson, HUH?
            Locksmith, Baroness's Musketeer,
            Provost & GU Black Wing Company,
            Rapier Marshal, Barony of One Thousand Eyes, Artemisia

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          • Katherine Throckmorton
            ... Shirt, underpants (I can t think of the correct term just now), hose, breeches,a doublet and/or a jerkin (sleeves may be attached seperately),ruff, hat,
            Message 5 of 10 , Mar 16, 2005
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              John wrote:
              > OK I've done confused myself, so I would like to ask here. Approximately
              > 1550 ~ 1570 English Male Garb; Name the layers from the skin out. (Pattern
              > suggestions welcome.)

              Shirt, underpants (I can't think of the correct term just now), hose, breeches,a doublet and/or a jerkin (sleeves may be attached seperately),ruff, hat, shoes.

              I would suggest going with the Gentleman's Wardrobe from Margo's Patterns:
              http://www.margospatterns.com/

              I haven't used this source, but Margo really knows her stuff and is a superlative costumer. Everyone I know who has had used these patterns loves them.

              If you are good at drafting, or know someone who is, there are variety of patterns avalible at:
              www.vertetsable.com
              And/or get ahold of a copy of _Patterns of Fashion_ by Janet Arnold.

              The hose could be cloth or knit, with cloth being more common. If you choose to go with knit, most Rev War sutlers will have wool ones. If you choose to go with cloth there are a variety of patterns around for making cloth hose. Vert et Sable has one online, and there is one in _The Medival Tailor's Assistant_. Or you can buy hose for $20 from Reconstructing History www.reconstructinghistory.com.

              Ruffs and shoes are a real challenge. I don't know of anyone in the US doing Elizabethian shoes (if you know please tell me!), and there aren't many who do ruffs, although there are a bunch of patterns around. Personally I'm not overly fond of the way that most of the repro ruffs look, but that's just me. Master Jose, of Desert Torch Tailoring has a slightly different theroy about how to do the pleating, and his (to my eyes anyway) look better. But he is pretty expensive, around $70 for a ruff.

              in service,
              Katherine Throgmorton


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            • Mary Taran
              ... www.vertetsable.com sells her ruffs on ebay for less than half that. I ve seen them, and they re magnificent. Well worth the $30 ($43 for lace-edged
              Message 6 of 10 , Mar 16, 2005
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                At 06:42 PM 3/16/2005, you wrote:
                >Ruffs and shoes are a real challenge. I don't know of anyone in the US
                >doing Elizabethian shoes (if you know please tell me!), and there aren't
                >many who do ruffs, although there are a bunch of patterns
                >around. Personally I'm not overly fond of the way that most of the repro
                >ruffs look, but that's just me. Master Jose, of Desert Torch Tailoring
                >has a slightly different theroy about how to do the pleating, and his (to
                >my eyes anyway) look better. But he is pretty expensive, around $70 for a
                >ruff.

                www.vertetsable.com sells her ruffs on ebay for less than half that. I've
                seen them, and they're magnificent. Well worth the $30 ($43 for lace-edged
                ruffs) for a ruff made to measure.

                Mary Taran


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              • Marc Lauterbach
                As for shoes, your best bets are... Boots by Bohemond: their Mary Rose shoe is earlier Tudor but as far as I know quite appropriate for later wear (though
                Message 7 of 10 , Mar 17, 2005
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                  As for shoes, your best bets are...

                  Boots by Bohemond: their "Mary Rose" shoe is earlier Tudor but as far
                  as I know quite appropriate for later wear (though bear in mind I'm
                  no cobbler!) You can pick up a pair in black for about $65
                  http://www.highfiber.com/~bohemond/Bootshop/period-page/period-
                  boots.htm

                  You can also get shoes from Syke's Sutlery for about $150
                  http://www.highfiber.com/~bohemond/Bootshop/period-page/period-
                  boots.htm

                  There are shoes from Burnley and Trowbridge out of Williamsburg
                  Viriniga which are quote good (if period more to the 17th century)
                  for $110 and you can get them in Red as well, which is quite nice and
                  very appropriate.
                  www.burnleyandtrowbridge.com

                  And, if you want to go the cheap and comfy route, here are
                  instructions on converting a pair of $25 dress shoes to quite decent
                  look-alike latchet shoes, if you don't mind doing a bit of sewing and
                  cutting (it's very easy, I've done it myself).

                  Regards!
                  Matthaeus.
                • Marc Lauterbach
                  ... decent ... and ... Go figure. I fogot to post the link. Bear in mind that you will have to copy/paste all the links I mentioned for they don t wrap for
                  Message 8 of 10 , Mar 18, 2005
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                    > And, if you want to go the cheap and comfy route, here are
                    > instructions on converting a pair of $25 dress shoes to quite
                    decent
                    > look-alike latchet shoes, if you don't mind doing a bit of sewing
                    and
                    > cutting (it's very easy, I've done it myself).
                    >
                    > Regards!
                    > Matthaeus.
                    Go figure. I fogot to post the link. Bear in mind that you will
                    have to copy/paste all the links I mentioned for they don't wrap for
                    some reason and if you just click on the blue stuff it'll take you to
                    some "CANNOT FIND PAGE" site.

                    http://www.luckhardt.com/ecwsa53.html
                  • Bookwyrm
                    In search of cool during this heat wave, Empath and I spent part of the day at the mall. The air conditioned mall. Because the book store closed an hour
                    Message 9 of 10 , Aug 1, 2006
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                      In search of cool during this heat wave, Empath and I spent part of
                      the day at the mall. The air conditioned mall. Because the book
                      store closed an hour later than the rest of the mall, we ended up
                      there . . . even though the book store is a very dangerous place for
                      me to be, financially. Worse than fabric stores, even! But I
                      digress.

                      I found one book in the Art section that seemed like it was
                      tailor-made for our purposes. "Masterpieces of Illumination: The
                      World's Most Famous Manuscripts 400 To 1600" was hundreds of thick
                      pages of colour images of manuscripts . . . well, from 400CE to
                      1600CE. Not all of them were European, but most were. There was
                      usually only one or two full-page illustrations per manuscript. The
                      price was unavailable on the dustjacket, and I was frankly afraid to
                      look at the sticker on the plastic-shrink-wrapped one, but Amazon
                      seems to believe that it's only worth US$25. http://tinyurl.com/symrv

                      A book I found on Amazon that I did not see in the store looks
                      intriguing, but I'm not sure about it. Has anybody here reviewed
                      "Colors Demonic and Divine: Shades of Meaning in the Middle Ages and
                      After? The Amazon "search inside" feature doesn't allow access to
                      enough pages in a row that I can make a judgement based on it.
                      http://tinyurl.com/pyhzg

                      --
                      Bookwyrm and Empath
                      Ontario, Canada
                    • Amy Heilveil
                      ... This book is a re-release without gold ink of an earlier title of Codices Illustries; The worlds most famous illuminated manuscripts by Walther and
                      Message 10 of 10 , Aug 2, 2006
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                        >
                        > I found one book in the Art section that seemed like it was
                        > tailor-made for our purposes. "Masterpieces of Illumination: The
                        > World's Most Famous Manuscripts 400 To 1600" was hundreds of thick
                        > pages of colour images of manuscripts . . . well, from 400CE to
                        > 1600CE. Not all of them were European, but most were. There was
                        > usually only one or two full-page illustrations per manuscript. The
                        > price was unavailable on the dustjacket, and I was frankly afraid to
                        > look at the sticker on the plastic-shrink-wrapped one, but Amazon
                        > seems to believe that it's only worth US$25. http://tinyurl.com/symrv



                        This book is a 're-release' without gold ink of an earlier title of "Codices
                        Illustries; The worlds most famous illuminated manuscripts" by Walther and
                        Wolf. It is completely worth the $25 that is being charged for the new
                        release, even if it doesn't have the gold ink in it. The original title was
                        US$60 so the new printing is a steal.

                        Smiles,
                        Despina


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