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walnut shells dangers

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  • Kathryn
    Please use caution when using any nut shell for dye purposes. They all contain toxins to protect the seed from being stolen by insects. The shells of some have
    Message 1 of 5 , Mar 5, 2005
      Please use caution when using any nut shell for dye purposes.

      They all contain toxins to protect the seed from being stolen by
      insects.
      The shells of some have been known to kill horses bedded on them
      (such as black walnut).

      If you are looking for a food safe dye in dark color ranges you are
      best to stick with food products.

      Regards,
      Kathryn
    • Pete McKee
      ... are ... Pardon my confusion, this caught my eye because I ve been using walnut dye for about 10 years on various articles of clothing, and I ve been a
      Message 2 of 5 , Mar 5, 2005
        --- In Authentic_SCA@yahoogroups.com, "Kathryn" <kmalacho@h...>
        wrote:
        >
        >
        > Please use caution when using any nut shell for dye purposes.
        >
        > They all contain toxins to protect the seed from being stolen by
        > insects.
        > The shells of some have been known to kill horses bedded on them
        > (such as black walnut).
        >
        > If you are looking for a food safe dye in dark color ranges you
        are
        > best to stick with food products.
        >
        > Regards,
        > Kathryn

        Pardon my confusion, this caught my eye because I've been using
        walnut dye for about 10 years on various articles of clothing, and
        I've been a horseman since I was 6 (I'm pushing 50 now). So I have
        a few questions. First, who in the world beds their horses on
        nutshells? Next, from the context of your message, I gather that
        you are refering to coloring food as opposed to staining wood or
        dyeing fabric or leather? With walnuts, at least, the dye is
        extracted from the hull, not the shell. Perhaps this is not the
        case for food coloring? I would actually be surprised if
        commercially grown nuts did not have an insecticide or repellent
        added to them, but, I can't imagine buying enough nuts to make a
        batch of dye. I gather mine from the woods.

        Take care,
        Pete McKee
      • wodeford
        ... I was under the impression that bedding horses on wood shavings of black walnut was dangerous. Could this be it? Jehanne de Wodeford
        Message 3 of 5 , Mar 5, 2005
          --- In Authentic_SCA@yahoogroups.com, "Pete McKee" <p_mckee3@y...> wrote:
          > Pardon my confusion, this caught my eye because I've been using
          > walnut dye for about 10 years on various articles of clothing, and
          > I've been a horseman since I was 6 (I'm pushing 50 now). So I have
          > a few questions. First, who in the world beds their horses on
          > nutshells?

          I was under the impression that bedding horses on wood shavings of
          black walnut was dangerous. Could this be it?

          Jehanne de Wodeford
        • wodeford
          ... More on the toxicity of black walnut: http://www.vet.purdue.edu/depts/addl/toxic/plant45.htm http://ohioline.osu.edu/hyg-fact/1000/1148.html Jehanne
          Message 4 of 5 , Mar 5, 2005
            --- In Authentic_SCA@yahoogroups.com, "wodeford" <wodeford@y...> wrote:
            >
            > --- In Authentic_SCA@yahoogroups.com, "Pete McKee" <p_mckee3@y...>
            wrote:
            > > Pardon my confusion, this caught my eye because I've been using
            > > walnut dye for about 10 years on various articles of clothing, and
            > > I've been a horseman since I was 6 (I'm pushing 50 now). So I have
            > > a few questions. First, who in the world beds their horses on
            > > nutshells?
            >
            > I was under the impression that bedding horses on wood shavings of
            > black walnut was dangerous. Could this be it?

            More on the toxicity of black walnut:
            http://www.vet.purdue.edu/depts/addl/toxic/plant45.htm

            http://ohioline.osu.edu/hyg-fact/1000/1148.html

            Jehanne
          • Pete McKee
            Thanks folks, Wood shavings makes a lot more sense to me than nutshells on the sick horse topic. Plenty of people use wood chips for livestock bedding.
            Message 5 of 5 , Mar 7, 2005
              Thanks folks,

              Wood shavings makes a lot more sense to me than nutshells on the
              sick horse topic. Plenty of people use wood chips for livestock
              bedding. Laminitis is crippling and colic can be fatal if not
              treated immediately. The original post was about nutshells, and
              some vague something in them to keep the bugs from eating the nut,
              and food safe dyes. Rather confusing to me, sorry. Something's got
              to kill me one day, but I promise not to eat my walnut dyed hunting
              shirts and stuff. Actually, the only thing walnut dyed I'm wearing
              these days is a pair of britches. My hunting shirts are dyed with
              sumac and the one for the Lewis & Clark Expedition is dyed with
              indigo (with silk ribbon trim, no less, it's the fanciest thing I
              own).

              Take care,
              Pete McKee
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