Loading ...
Sorry, an error occurred while loading the content.

Re: [Authentic_SCA] Re: 15th Century under armor

Expand Messages
  • Lyonet
    Pete, I am most grateful for the info and have passed it onto my lord who is going to make a brig similar to the one in the link and has not had much luck with
    Message 1 of 6 , Mar 4, 2005
    • 0 Attachment
      Pete,

      I am most grateful for the info and have passed it onto my lord who is going to make a brig similar to the one in the link and has not had much luck with finding what was worn under it.

      Thank You so MUCH for sharing.

      Lyonet
      ----- Original Message -----
      From: Pete McKee
      To: Authentic_SCA@yahoogroups.com
      Sent: Friday, March 04, 2005 9:40 AM
      Subject: [Authentic_SCA] Re: 15th Century under armor



      --- In Authentic_SCA@yahoogroups.com, "Lyonet" <llyonet@c...> wrote:
      >
      > I am wondering if anyone has any information on padded armor that
      would of been worn in the mid 15th century? Specificly what would of
      been worn under a brigadine? >

      Those exposed plates on the inside of that brigandine will chew up
      your clothing if you don't wear something under it. By mid 15th
      century, I take it you mean 1450ish? My experience is with the
      early 17th century, so this may or may not apply to your needs.

      An arming doublet ( I think it was called a gambeson in earlier
      periods)protects your clothing and gives you some padding to cushion
      blows. It also adds weight, and is VERY warm. A leather jack or
      jerkin would protect your clothes if the extra padding is not
      important to you. The arming doublet is made to the same pattern as
      a normal doublet of your period, without the sleeves. It consists
      of several layers of heavy canvas (hemp, not the modern cotton duck)
      with some sort of batting in the middle. All this is held in place
      with rows of stitching, either in parallel vertical rows, or in a
      diagonal criss-crossing pattern. The batting could consist of tow
      (an initial stage of processing flax or a byproduct, I'm not sure
      which), rags, raw wool, or dry grass. The synthetic batting sold at
      craft supply places is good for warmth, but won't give the padding
      needed for combat. It also looks "poofy" compared to period
      materials. You may be able to find the old style 100% cotton
      batting at a good quilting supply store. You can save money on the
      inner layers of canvas by using the cotton duck, or a canvas
      painters drop cloth. I've found some of the latter at Lowes home
      supply stores that have a coarse "rustic" weave to them. If you use
      the hemp on the outside, and the coarse cotton stuff on the inside
      layers, it's not such a big deal if the outer layer wears through a
      bit. Hope that helps some.

      Take care,
      Pete McKee





      ----------------------------------------------------
      This is the Authentic SCA eGroup


      Yahoo! Groups Sponsor
      ADVERTISEMENT





      ------------------------------------------------------------------------------
      Yahoo! Groups Links

      a.. To visit your group on the web, go to:
      http://groups.yahoo.com/group/Authentic_SCA/

      b.. To unsubscribe from this group, send an email to:
      Authentic_SCA-unsubscribe@yahoogroups.com

      c.. Your use of Yahoo! Groups is subject to the Yahoo! Terms of Service.



      [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
    • Marc Lauterbach
      Regarding under-armour stuff... For the most part, better-armed and equipped soldiers would wear at least a chainmail shirt under their coat of plates, both to
      Message 2 of 6 , Mar 4, 2005
      • 0 Attachment
        Regarding under-armour stuff...

        For the most part, better-armed and equipped soldiers would wear
        at least a chainmail shirt under their coat of plates, both to
        cushion the blows as well as to provide rudimentary protection to the
        arms and armpits, thereby immediately "solving" the problem of the
        rivets shredding clothes. However, due to the weight and
        inconvenience, this practice (brig over mail) is very rare in the
        SCA, since we're not really too concerned about an arrow punching
        through a weak joint between the plates or a heavy blow popping
        rivets in combat ;) To be honest, I don't fight too too often heavy,
        but I have a Wisby Type 1 coat of plates and never had too much
        trouble with the rivets tearing clothes, I just duct taped over the
        rivets on the inside and it was done.

        To solve the problem (and also for the less well-equipped men at
        arms who would forgo mail hauberks entirely), you want to get
        yourself either an arming doublet or some kind of gambeson. In
        period this stared off first to go under mail to help cushion the
        blows (sometimes worn by itself by footsoldiers), and later evolved
        into an elaborate garment involving lacing points, strategic padding,
        and patches of mail over various places like the armpits and groin in
        order to reduce the weight of having to wear a full mail shirt.

        Examples can be seen here:
        1) http://www.historicenterprises.com/cart.php?
        m=product_detail&p=288&c=25

        2) http://www.revival.us/index.asp?PageAction=VIEWPROD&ProdID=121

        If you want to make your own, you can check here, as they have
        directions as to how to make one and period illustrations:
        1) http://www.charlesfleming-sca.com/military/gambeson.htm

        2)http://www.cs.ndsu.nodak.edu/~malarkey/sca/armourpages/gambeson.html

        Hope that helps!
        Matthaeus
      Your message has been successfully submitted and would be delivered to recipients shortly.