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Wool Questions?

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  • Elsa
    I have 100% Wool Crepe available to me. Is this a type of wool that was available in the 13th century? Or is it similar enough to pass? Thank you, Elsa
    Message 1 of 3 , Mar 3, 2005
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      I have 100% Wool Crepe available to me. Is this a type of wool that
      was available in the 13th century? Or is it similar enough to pass?

      Thank you,

      Elsa
    • michaelstuartgraham
      Hi, Elsa. Technically, wool crepe is a fabric with the texture created by over spinning the threads, creating a nubbly surface, so there wasn t really such a
      Message 2 of 3 , Mar 14, 2005
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        Hi, Elsa. Technically, wool crepe is a fabric with the texture created
        by over spinning the threads, creating a nubbly surface, so there
        wasn't really such a thing produced intentionally, as far as I know,
        in the period. The good thing is that it is made with worsted yarn,
        probably more accurate than the shorter staple woolens. If it were
        mine, I'd full it (wash it in very hot agitated water) a lot so that
        the surface wasn't visible. Hey, at least you are trying woolens,
        which is a far better choice, in my opinion, than many. Good Luck, Mike T.
      • bex_1014
        Hi: I didn t see the first post on this, but this is what I posted to the list some time ago. (NB - the archives are your friend.) ... I have used crepe, and
        Message 3 of 3 , Mar 15, 2005
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          Hi:
          I didn't see the first post on this, but this is what I posted to the
          list some time ago. (NB - the archives are your friend.)
          ----
          I have used crepe, and will never do so again unless somebody gives
          me some. Crepe shrinks like mad, and stretches in all sorts of wierd
          ways. Having said that, here's what I've picked up on wool crepe -
          note that silk or other crepes I haven't checked on.
          Gabardine is a regular twill weave and is much better.

          Below are some quotes, 1 from an answer I got from a different
          list, when I asked about crepe pre-16th century, 1 from the archives
          on H-Cost
          In summary: pre-1000 - in Northern (Scandinavian) Europe, broken
          twill patterns, yes, over-twisted yarns, probably (not 100% sure of
          source).
          1000-1800 - not as far as we know. 18-something to present -
          invention of crepe with over-twisted yarn _and_ broken twill
          structure using machine looms.

          The quotes start here--------------------

          "While a simple four-harness/shaft crepe structure was woven on
          warp-weighted looms prior to 1000 (See Bender J⧥nsen, Lise.
          Forhistoriske Textiler i Skandinavien. Nordiske Fortidsminder Serie
          B, Bind 9. Copenhagen: Det Kongelige Nordiske Oldskriftselskab,
          1986. -----. North European Textiles until AD 1000. Aarhus, Denmark:
          Aarhus University Press, 1991. Wonderful book...), what you get as
          crepe these days is much more complex, having been woven on a
          commercial loom of anywhere from two to a bazillion harnesses. Crepe-
          backed satin is one of those complex multi-harnessed critters where
          you've got two different cloth structures interlocked together.
          Crepe, when a weaver is discussing fabric interlacement structure, is
          a random broken twill, usually woven on eight or more shafts. A
          simple four-harness crepe was woven on the warp-weighted loom as far
          back as 800 or thereabouts in Northern Europe-- the archaeological
          textile people call it by its German name, Kreuzkoeper or korskiper
          in Danish, and define it as a 2/2 twill that reverses weave every two
          threads; it has no specific name in English. This is what the ancient
          crepe looked like:
          ..XX..XX..XX..XX..XX..XX
          .X.X.X.X.X.X.X.X.X.X.X.X
          XX..XX..XX..XX..XX..XX..
          X.X.X.X.X.X.X.X.X.X.X.X.
          ..XX..XX..XX..XX..XX..XX
          .X.X.X.X.X.X.X.X.X.X.X.X
          XX..XX..XX..XX..XX..XX..
          X.X.X.X.X.X.X.X.X.X.X.X.
          There _is_ a pattern, really.
          ciorstan "
          -----------------End Quote 1

          Quote 2--------------------
          >I have a question that I'm really hoping you can help me with. It
          >concerns crepe weave fabric. Is it documentable to the Middle Ages,
          or perhaps even to the Viking era?

          Weeeellllll, that depends on how you define "crepe." ;>

          There are two common definitions of "crepe." One is "tabby weave
          using overspun yarns." The effect of using the overspun yarns is
          that the cloth crinkles up even though the structure is regular--kind
          of like the "tracking" effect that some yarns give, only much more
          pronounced.
          This type of crepe weave is period to Vikings: some fine wool crepe
          fragments from Hedeby are believed to be the remains of men's poofy
          pants. Being lightweight fine wool, they're appropriate for the sort
          of garment that calls for a great deal of material bunched up in a
          relatively confined place.
          --snip--
          Accordingly, in order to know whether any given commercial crepe
          textile you want to use is appropriate, you'd have to dissect a bit
          of it and see how it's made. Does this help?

          Yours,
          Carolyn Priest-Dorman
          -------------------------Quote Ends

          Hope this helps,
          Rebecca

          PS I can put this in the archive if people want.
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