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Most Holy Virgin Gown

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  • silverloon2001
    Greetings! I, too, am looking for a bibliographical citation. The files section contains a Virgin Gown folder with wonderful scans of the gown details.
    Message 1 of 3 , Feb 4, 2005
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      Greetings!

      I, too, am looking for a bibliographical citation. The "files"
      section contains a Virgin Gown folder with wonderful scans of the
      gown details. From what book did these come? The poster's e-mail
      address is private, so I am unable to contact her directly, and no
      details seem to be in the archives at the time the folder was
      uploaded.

      In service,
      Hedewigis.
    • Chris Laning
      ... I recognize that, and I even know what book she scanned it from. This is the dress of the Virgin from the Liebfrauenkirche (Our Lady s Church) in Trier.
      Message 2 of 3 , Feb 4, 2005
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        At 11:33 AM +0000 2/4/05, silverloon2001 wrote:
        >I, too, am looking for a bibliographical citation. The "files"
        >section contains a Virgin Gown folder with wonderful scans of the
        >gown details. From what book did these come? The poster's e-mail
        >address is private, so I am unable to contact her directly, and no
        >details seem to be in the archives at the time the folder was
        >uploaded.

        I recognize that, and I even know what book she scanned it from.

        This is the "dress of the Virgin" from the Liebfrauenkirche (Our
        Lady's Church) in Trier. It has been in Trier at least since before
        1513, since it's shown on the front cover of a booklet printed at
        that date.

        The information on it comes from _Textile Conservation and Research_
        , by Dr. Mechtild Flury-Lemberg, published by the Abegg-Stiftung Bern
        in 1988. The ISBN of the English edition is 3-905014-02-5. I know
        several people on the list have this book, and it was still for sale
        (but only directly from the Abegg Institute) just a few years ago. I
        bought my copy used, and it was still well over $100, but it's
        utterly fascinating.

        Apparently what's going on here is that the original silk fabric
        scraps were found inside the portable altar of St. Willibrordus in
        the very early 1500s. They were already described as "very thin,
        delicate and soft" at that point and are now extremely fragile. In
        the 1500s they were stitched onto the existing linen tunic, together
        with a silk 'veil' to protect them. The back has several large
        fragments, covering perhaps 90% of the back of the linen tunic, and
        the front has mostly disintegrated into nearly 800 tiny fragments,
        many of them fingernail-sized or smaller.

        What's in the book is the account of how this was taken apart,
        conserved, and re-assembled in 1984. The scraps of "dress" fabric
        were carefully removed one by one and sewed between two layers of
        silk crepeline to make a separate sort of "over-tunic", since the
        silk scraps and the linen tunic need different cleaning methods. Both
        were carefully washed and then hung together, with the linen tunic
        inside, for the new display.

        The "Virgin's dress" fabrics include a couple of different woven
        patterns, at least one of which is an 11th/12th century silk that may
        have come from Byzantium or elsewhere in the Middle East.

        The linen tunic is also lined with green silk taffeta, but by the way
        it's stitched, this must have been done _after_ the dress fragments
        were attached to the outside. The green lining is not part of the
        original Virgin's dress but is an addition, probably from the 1500s.

        I think I know who originally posted these photos and can probably
        put you in contact with her if you need it.
        --
        ____________________________________________________________

        O (Lady) Christian de Holacombe , Shire of Windy Meads
        + Chris Laning <claning@...>
        http://paternoster-row.org - http://paternosters.blogspot.com
        ____________________________________________________________
      • SilverLoon2001@aol.com
        Thank you, Chris, for that wonderful account of the dress. I will try to ILL the book. It has been mentioned so many times recently it has been pushed to the
        Message 3 of 3 , Feb 6, 2005
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          Thank you, Chris, for that wonderful account of the dress. I will try to ILL
          the book. It has been mentioned so many times recently it has been pushed to
          the "must see" list.

          We used the method this weekend to create a Manesse Codex style sleeveless
          overgown. The stuffed pleats worked beautifully and use scrap pieces of fabric
          remaining after cutting the body pieces. I had found no other method to
          adequately replicate the look.

          In service,
          Hedewigis.


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