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Female version of cioppa

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  • lithia_black
    Hi ! I ve been lurking on this list for a month or two but finally coughed up enough coruage to post. :) I m building an wardrobe for my persona Giovanna
    Message 1 of 4 , Jan 31, 2005
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      Hi !

      I've been lurking on this list for a month or two but finally coughed
      up enough coruage to post. :)

      I'm building an wardrobe for my persona Giovanna Furetti and my
      chosen period is Italian 1480's.
      I found god artfrefences on most garments but not the famous cioppa
      that all married women are supposed to wear when going outside the
      house.
      It's no panic since neither me or my persona is married yet but I
      will be in the future and it will be nice to have the research done
      then.

      So is there anyone out there who have any picture references or made
      a female version cioppa ?

      /L
      http://hem.passagen.se/lithia
    • Karen Hall
      Hi Lithia - and welcome to the list! Have you had a look at Jacqueline Herald s _Dress in Renaissance Italy: 1400- 1500_ yet? I can t give you the full
      Message 2 of 4 , Jan 31, 2005
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        Hi Lithia - and welcome to the list!

        Have you had a look at Jacqueline Herald's _Dress in Renaissance Italy: 1400-
        1500_ yet? I can't give you the full reference because I'm travelling at the
        moment, but it is a very useful starting point as it discusses different items
        of clothing, and has a lot of relevant pictures collected in it.

        From memory, a cioppa is designed along similar lines to a gamurra, with a
        tight, high-waisted bodice section. The main different seems to be the types
        of material and decoration used, with richer, heavier materials used in the
        cioppa. There are some references to women wearing only the gamurra in summer
        (useful if you want to authentically justify minimal layers in a hot climate)
        but in those cases the gamurra seem to be made of silk, and to have been
        decorated in some way. Have you decided on any particular place in Italy yet?
        There is some regional variation in clothing, for example Florentine dress
        tends to be less decorated with wealth shown by fabric choice rather than
        trimmings.

        Good luck, and if you find any exciting info don't hestitate to share it with
        us,

        Alessandra

        Quoting lithia_black <Lithia@...>:

        > Hi !
        >
        > I've been lurking on this list for a month or two but finally coughed
        > up enough coruage to post. :)
        >
        > I'm building an wardrobe for my persona Giovanna Furetti and my
        > chosen period is Italian 1480's.
        > I found god artfrefences on most garments but not the famous cioppa
        > that all married women are supposed to wear when going outside the
        > house.
        > It's no panic since neither me or my persona is married yet but I
        > will be in the future and it will be nice to have the research done
        > then.
        >
        > So is there anyone out there who have any picture references or made
        > a female version cioppa ?
        >
        > /L
        > http://hem.passagen.se/lithia
      • Lady_Lark_Azure
        Try this link to Kamilla von Anderlecht s page. I know she s done a lot of research on the gamurre and her page includes a section about an overdress which
        Message 3 of 4 , Jan 31, 2005
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          Try this link to Kamilla von Anderlecht's page. I know she's done a
          lot of research on the gamurre and her page includes a section about
          an overdress which may be the piece you mentioned.

          http://www.geocities.com/kamillavh/01.html

          Hope it helps,
          Isabeau
        • lithia_black
          Hi, and thanks ! I ve read Jaqueline Herald and I m currently reading Birbari. I thought the shape of the cioppa was more lika a cirle section cut garment.
          Message 4 of 4 , Feb 1, 2005
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            Hi, and thanks !

            I've read Jaqueline Herald and I'm currently reading Birbari.
            I thought the shape of the cioppa was more lika a cirle section cut
            garment. Several resources compare it with the houppulade.
            But if cioppa is just a heavier type of overdress it's more easy to
            find pictures of it.

            The region I'm going for is Florence since I fell in love with the
            clothing in Ghirlandaios paintings :)

            /L

            --- In Authentic_SCA@yahoogroups.com, Karen Hall <karenh@c...> wrote:
            > Hi Lithia - and welcome to the list!
            >
            > Have you had a look at Jacqueline Herald's _Dress in Renaissance
            Italy: 1400-
            > 1500_ yet? I can't give you the full reference because I'm
            travelling at the
            > moment, but it is a very useful starting point as it discusses
            different items
            > of clothing, and has a lot of relevant pictures collected in it.
            >
            > From memory, a cioppa is designed along similar lines to a
            gamurra, with a
            > tight, high-waisted bodice section. The main different seems to be
            the types
            > of material and decoration used, with richer, heavier materials
            used in the
            > cioppa. There are some references to women wearing only the gamurra
            in summer
            > (useful if you want to authentically justify minimal layers in a
            hot climate)
            > but in those cases the gamurra seem to be made of silk, and to have
            been
            > decorated in some way. Have you decided on any particular place in
            Italy yet?
            > There is some regional variation in clothing, for example
            Florentine dress
            > tends to be less decorated with wealth shown by fabric choice
            rather than
            > trimmings.
            >
            > Good luck, and if you find any exciting info don't hestitate to
            share it with
            > us,
            >
            > Alessandra
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