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Piece of Eden, was Livestock

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  • MD Smith
    And just where is this little slice of Eden? MD/Marged in cold but only slightly snowy Cody WY
    Message 1 of 6 , Jan 4, 2005
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      And just where is this little slice of Eden?

      MD/Marged
      in cold but only slightly snowy Cody WY

      Saerlaith ingen Ruadan wrote:
      > so my partner & I picked a really nice area full of organic farms, 3 colleges and lots of "buy local"
      > type folks.
    • Saerlaith ingen Ruadan
      Oh boy am I going to get in trouble for this, but, after living in Seattle my entire life, then spending a year & half on a farm in NE Washington state, I
      Message 2 of 6 , Jan 4, 2005
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        Oh boy am I going to get in trouble for this, but, after living in Seattle
        my entire life, then spending a year & half on a farm in NE Washington
        state, I wanted to be back in my proper ecosystem. Not right back in the big
        city, but close enough to visit family and go to my favorite places. Not in
        the country, because I llike richness and diversity. Big enough to have good
        Thai food, college town for free thinkers and youthfulness, on the water,
        cuz me feets are webbed, near the mountains, as a proper home should be (LOL
        I camp & hike like most folk breathe). I even looked at future global
        warming issues, volcano and tsunami hazards. And I picked.......drum roll
        please.......


        Bellingham, WA

        Not that it's perfect, but for me it's eden. It's been named in a few top
        ten places lists, so growth management is a hot issue. House prices are
        high, relatively speaking. If you're from Cali, they're still cheap. If
        you're a local, they are outrageous. I'm hoping to score a decent stead
        within biking range of downtown (farmers market, food co-op, tasty
        restaurants & my work). We may be able to buy a 1/2 to 1 acre lot & have a
        place built in our budget too.

        It's chilly here, in the 20's this week, but no snow yet. Summers don't get
        very hot either, but anything over 80 makes me cry. I have to choose food
        plants for short cool summers, though in the future they will be hotter &
        drier. I'm planning to harvest rainwater (about 33"/yr) for any water needs
        I can.

        Anyway, I'd best stop the rambling and get to bed 8- ) Come visit the lovely
        NW. Nine months of rain, 12 months of heaven!

        --Saerlaith

        ----- Original Message -----
        From: "MD Smith" <editor@...>
        To: <Authentic_SCA@yahoogroups.com>
        Sent: Tuesday, January 04, 2005 7:16 PM
        Subject: [Authentic_SCA] Piece of Eden, was Livestock


        >
        >
        > And just where is this little slice of Eden?
        >
        > MD/Marged
        > in cold but only slightly snowy Cody WY
        >
        > Saerlaith ingen Ruadan wrote:
        > > so my partner & I picked a really nice area full of organic farms, 3
        colleges and lots of "buy local"
        > > type folks.
        >
        >
        >
        >
        >
        >
        > ----------------------------------------------------
        > This is the Authentic SCA eGroup
        > Yahoo! Groups Links
        >
        >
        >
        >
        >
        >
        >
        >
        >
        > --
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        > Checked by AVG Anti-Virus.
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        >
        >



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      • ursula_of_fowlkeep
        I have a similar bit of Eden in Portland Oregon. My Eden is a half acre yard, small house, chickens, huge vegetable garden, and increasing orchard. As a
        Message 3 of 6 , Jan 6, 2005
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          I have a similar bit of Eden in Portland Oregon. My Eden is a half acre yard, small
          house, chickens, huge vegetable garden, and increasing orchard. As a permaculturist
          I bought with similar cosiderations in mind, produce my own food, but near to jobs
          and city ammenities.

          One option for a fiber animal is to get angora rabbits. You can get them neutered if
          you don't want to have meat rabbits too. Then make a rabbit tractor(movable pen) to
          mow the lawn. You can pull the hair off an angora bunny and spin right from the
          rabbit. If you tame the rabbit, it may sit on your lap while you do it.

          My husband and I are still considering Muscovey ducks as a meat animal. They
          reproduce well and a friend of mine gets 3 clutches of ducklings each year from each
          breeder duck. Muscoveys are not "Knowen World" for they come from South America,
          but duck is period.

          In all likelyhood bees will be our next livestock, even though I am very leary of the
          medicating aspects. I read an article in a permaculture publication years ago about
          someone who controlled their mite problems with using round hives. The mite
          population builds up in the corners and that's how the infestation gets out of hand.

          My favorite crops are fruit. I grow many varieties of fruit, and my yard is turning into
          a food forest. For short/cool summer fruit crops check out One Green World nursery
          in Molalla Oregon which sells many obscure fruits. Some are period like quince,
          currants, and medlars and they have many Russian/Asian fruits developed during the
          cold war era which are very cold hardy and offer lots of fruit for shot seasons.

          http://www.onegreenworld.com/

          Another plant resource that has a great selection of chestnut trees, which were an
          important food source since Roman times, is Burnt Ridge Nursery in Onalaska,
          Washington. I'm planting chestnuts, they produce and amazing amount of food.

          http://landru.myhome.net/burntridge/

          Good luck in your home serach,

          Ursula of Fowlkeep

          --- In Authentic_SCA@yahoogroups.com, "Saerlaith ingen Ruadan" <barknark@p...>
          wrote:
          >
          > Oh boy am I going to get in trouble for this, but, after living in Seattle
          > my entire life, then spending a year & half on a farm in NE Washington
          > state, I wanted to be back in my proper ecosystem. Not right back in the big
          > city, but close enough to visit family and go to my favorite places. Not in
          > the country, because I llike richness and diversity. Big enough to have good
          > Thai food, college town for free thinkers and youthfulness, on the water,
          > cuz me feets are webbed, near the mountains, as a proper home should be (LOL
          > I camp & hike like most folk breathe). I even looked at future global
          > warming issues, volcano and tsunami hazards. And I picked.......drum roll
          > please.......
          >
          >
          > Bellingham, WA
          >
          > Not that it's perfect, but for me it's eden. It's been named in a few top
          > ten places lists, so growth management is a hot issue. House prices are
          > high, relatively speaking. If you're from Cali, they're still cheap. If
          > you're a local, they are outrageous. I'm hoping to score a decent stead
          > within biking range of downtown (farmers market, food co-op, tasty
          > restaurants & my work). We may be able to buy a 1/2 to 1 acre lot & have a
          > place built in our budget too.
          >
          > It's chilly here, in the 20's this week, but no snow yet. Summers don't get
          > very hot either, but anything over 80 makes me cry. I have to choose food
          > plants for short cool summers, though in the future they will be hotter &
          > drier. I'm planning to harvest rainwater (about 33"/yr) for any water needs
          > I can.
          >
          > Anyway, I'd best stop the rambling and get to bed 8- ) Come visit the lovely
          > NW. Nine months of rain, 12 months of heaven!
          >
          > --Saerlaith
          >
        • Saerlaith ingen Ruadan
          Thanks for the info! I ve bought many plants from Burnt Ridge. I was doing my backyard in Seattle with all natives, and mostly edible. I plan to order more
          Message 4 of 6 , Jan 6, 2005
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            Thanks for the info!

            I've bought many plants from Burnt Ridge. I was doing my backyard in Seattle
            with all natives, and mostly edible. I plan to order more from them as soon
            as I settle.

            I love the idea of neutering rabbits! What a great solution to them doing
            what rabbits do best 8- ) I'm planning to do a combo of chicken tractor and
            moat. The moat being a double fence around the garden/critter yard, with
            about 3 feet between fences. Some chickies have run of the moat, eating bugs
            before they reach the garden. I think I might have my eating chickens do
            that, and keep my hens in a coop/tractor on my raised beds. I really want to
            try bees, but I'm also leery of investing in the process and being over my
            head. But producing my own honey and wax would be incredible.

            I'm just learning more about the whole permaculture thing, even though I had
            inklings of it before I had a name for it. It's funny how the way many of
            our ancestors lived by default are also good ways to live simply now. I read
            that Elderberry was called the medicine chest of the poor, and after growing
            one myself, I can agree. Food, medicine, trellis wood, wine makings, even
            bird food (the berries I can't reach) all from one big shrub.

            --Saerlaith



            ----- Original Message -----
            From: "ursula_of_fowlkeep" <solem_atrum@...>
            To: <Authentic_SCA@yahoogroups.com>
            Sent: Thursday, January 06, 2005 9:02 AM
            Subject: [Authentic_SCA] Re: Piece of Eden, was Livestock


            >
            >
            >
            >
            > I have a similar bit of Eden in Portland Oregon. My Eden is a half acre
            yard, small
            > house, chickens, huge vegetable garden, and increasing orchard. As a
            permaculturist
            > I bought with similar cosiderations in mind, produce my own food, but near
            to jobs
            > and city ammenities.
            >
            > One option for a fiber animal is to get angora rabbits. You can get them
            neutered if
            > you don't want to have meat rabbits too. Then make a rabbit
            tractor(movable pen) to
            > mow the lawn. You can pull the hair off an angora bunny and spin right
            from the
            > rabbit. If you tame the rabbit, it may sit on your lap while you do it.
            >
            > My husband and I are still considering Muscovey ducks as a meat animal.
            They
            > reproduce well and a friend of mine gets 3 clutches of ducklings each year
            from each
            > breeder duck. Muscoveys are not "Knowen World" for they come from South
            America,
            > but duck is period.
            >
            > In all likelyhood bees will be our next livestock, even though I am very
            leary of the
            > medicating aspects. I read an article in a permaculture publication years
            ago about
            > someone who controlled their mite problems with using round hives. The
            mite
            > population builds up in the corners and that's how the infestation gets
            out of hand.
            >
            > My favorite crops are fruit. I grow many varieties of fruit, and my yard
            is turning into
            > a food forest. For short/cool summer fruit crops check out One Green World
            nursery
            > in Molalla Oregon which sells many obscure fruits. Some are period like
            quince,
            > currants, and medlars and they have many Russian/Asian fruits developed
            during the
            > cold war era which are very cold hardy and offer lots of fruit for shot
            seasons.
            >
            > http://www.onegreenworld.com/
            >
            > Another plant resource that has a great selection of chestnut trees, which
            were an
            > important food source since Roman times, is Burnt Ridge Nursery in
            Onalaska,
            > Washington. I'm planting chestnuts, they produce and amazing amount of
            food.
            >
            > http://landru.myhome.net/burntridge/
            >
            > Good luck in your home serach,
            >
            > Ursula of Fowlkeep



            --
            No virus found in this outgoing message.
            Checked by AVG Anti-Virus.
            Version: 7.0.298 / Virus Database: 265.6.8 - Release Date: 1/3/2005
          • Soeur Ysobel de Montfaucon
            I LOVE SEATTLE. SEATTLE is a fabulous place. *sigh* As for bunny fixing . Yup, it s a good idea. My sister had one neutered lop-ear named Ranger & a younger
            Message 5 of 6 , Jan 7, 2005
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              I LOVE SEATTLE. SEATTLE is a fabulous place. *sigh*

              As for bunny 'fixing'. Yup, it's a good idea. My sister had one
              neutered lop-ear named Ranger & a younger intact fella. One day my
              Psychologist sister came home & dead with his head excavated & brain
              eaten. Yuck. Watership Down.

              -----Original Message-----
              From: Saerlaith ingen Ruadan [mailto:barknark@...]
              Sent: 6-Jan-05 9:33 PM
              To: Authentic_SCA@yahoogroups.com
              Subject: Re: [Authentic_SCA] Re: Piece of Eden, was Livestock


              Thanks for the info!

              I've bought many plants from Burnt Ridge. I was doing my backyard in
              Seattle
              with all natives, and mostly edible. I plan to order more from them as
              soon
              as I settle.

              I love the idea of neutering rabbits! What a great solution to them
              doing
              what rabbits do best 8- ) I'm planning to do a combo of chicken tractor
              and
              moat. The moat being a double fence around the garden/critter yard, with
              about 3 feet between fences. Some chickies have run of the moat, eating
              bugs
              before they reach the garden. I think I might have my eating chickens do
              that, and keep my hens in a coop/tractor on my raised beds. I really
              want to
              try bees, but I'm also leery of investing in the process and being over
              my
              head. But producing my own honey and wax would be incredible.

              I'm just learning more about the whole permaculture thing, even though I
              had
              inklings of it before I had a name for it. It's funny how the way many
              of
              our ancestors lived by default are also good ways to live simply now. I
              read
              that Elderberry was called the medicine chest of the poor, and after
              growing
              one myself, I can agree. Food, medicine, trellis wood, wine makings,
              even
              bird food (the berries I can't reach) all from one big shrub.

              --Saerlaith



              ----- Original Message -----
              From: "ursula_of_fowlkeep" <solem_atrum@...>
              To: <Authentic_SCA@yahoogroups.com>
              Sent: Thursday, January 06, 2005 9:02 AM
              Subject: [Authentic_SCA] Re: Piece of Eden, was Livestock


              >
              >
              >
              >
              > I have a similar bit of Eden in Portland Oregon. My Eden is a half
              acre
              yard, small
              > house, chickens, huge vegetable garden, and increasing orchard. As a
              permaculturist
              > I bought with similar cosiderations in mind, produce my own food, but
              near
              to jobs
              > and city ammenities.
              >
              > One option for a fiber animal is to get angora rabbits. You can get
              them
              neutered if
              > you don't want to have meat rabbits too. Then make a rabbit
              tractor(movable pen) to
              > mow the lawn. You can pull the hair off an angora bunny and spin right
              from the
              > rabbit. If you tame the rabbit, it may sit on your lap while you do
              it.
              >
              > My husband and I are still considering Muscovey ducks as a meat
              animal.
              They
              > reproduce well and a friend of mine gets 3 clutches of ducklings each
              year
              from each
              > breeder duck. Muscoveys are not "Knowen World" for they come from
              South
              America,
              > but duck is period.
              >
              > In all likelyhood bees will be our next livestock, even though I am
              very
              leary of the
              > medicating aspects. I read an article in a permaculture publication
              years
              ago about
              > someone who controlled their mite problems with using round hives. The
              mite
              > population builds up in the corners and that's how the infestation
              gets
              out of hand.
              >
              > My favorite crops are fruit. I grow many varieties of fruit, and my
              yard
              is turning into
              > a food forest. For short/cool summer fruit crops check out One Green
              World
              nursery
              > in Molalla Oregon which sells many obscure fruits. Some are period
              like
              quince,
              > currants, and medlars and they have many Russian/Asian fruits
              developed
              during the
              > cold war era which are very cold hardy and offer lots of fruit for
              shot
              seasons.
              >
              > http://www.onegreenworld.com/
              >
              > Another plant resource that has a great selection of chestnut trees,
              which
              were an
              > important food source since Roman times, is Burnt Ridge Nursery in
              Onalaska,
              > Washington. I'm planting chestnuts, they produce and amazing amount of
              food.
              >
              > http://landru.myhome.net/burntridge/
              >
              > Good luck in your home serach,
              >
              > Ursula of Fowlkeep



              --
              No virus found in this outgoing message.
              Checked by AVG Anti-Virus.
              Version: 7.0.298 / Virus Database: 265.6.8 - Release Date: 1/3/2005






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              [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
            • Saerlaith ingen Ruadan
              I guess that s one of the tougher things about critter keeping. Not only is there all the care involved in getting what you want out of them (milk, meat, eggs)
              Message 6 of 6 , Jan 7, 2005
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                I guess that's one of the tougher things about critter keeping. Not only is
                there all the care involved in getting what you want out of them (milk,
                meat, eggs) but then there is the intra-species strife to moderate.

                I had a pet rat who had babies, and something similar happened. Not
                pleasant, hence me not having rats as pets anymore.

                Originally I had wanted to recreate some kind of period stead, complete with
                likely animals. But after taking into account land prices, critter keeping,
                mundane job requirements, etc. I decided a biiiiig yard with room for
                garden, chickens and maybe a couple of goats or mini cows. And a Cardigan
                Welsh Corgi. At least the dog I want is period 8- )

                --Saerlaith

                ----- Original Message -----
                From: "Soeur Ysobel de Montfaucon" <ysobel@...>
                To: <Authentic_SCA@yahoogroups.com>
                Sent: Friday, January 07, 2005 4:24 PM
                Subject: RE: [Authentic_SCA] Re: Piece of Eden, was Livestock


                >
                >
                > I LOVE SEATTLE. SEATTLE is a fabulous place. *sigh*
                >
                > As for bunny 'fixing'. Yup, it's a good idea. My sister had one
                > neutered lop-ear named Ranger & a younger intact fella. One day my
                > Psychologist sister came home & dead with his head excavated & brain
                > eaten. Yuck. Watership Down.
                >



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                No virus found in this outgoing message.
                Checked by AVG Anti-Virus.
                Version: 7.0.298 / Virus Database: 265.6.8 - Release Date: 1/3/2005
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