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Re: German cape-coats

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  • hunyddthered
    msgilliandurham wrote: (snipped) ... Do mean something like this? http://www.marquise.de/en/1500/weigel/wgl20.shtml It s not quite a cloak, but it is a full
    Message 1 of 12 , Jan 3, 2005
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      "msgilliandurham" wrote:

      (snipped)
      > I'm looking for more information on a German Renaissance garment --
      > It's described in Janet Winter's Elizabethan Costuming as being a
      > full circle cloak, hip length, with 2-piece sleeves. She says in
      > England it was only worn by men, but in Germany it was sometimes
      > worn by women as well.

      Do mean something like this?

      http://www.marquise.de/en/1500/weigel/wgl20.shtml

      It's not quite a cloak, but it is a full bodied short jacket (and is
      sooooo cute! how could you NOT want to make one!)

      Cheers,
      Hunydd
    • msgilliandurham
      Hmm -- this is close enough to document that women wore this style -- and yes, these are not a full circle (although since the fake fur lining is napped, I m
      Message 2 of 12 , Jan 4, 2005
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        Hmm -- this is close enough to document that women wore this style --
        and yes, these are not a full circle (although since the fake fur
        lining is napped, I'm not going to save much on fabric!) Thank you -
        - mine will have full-length sleeves -- this appears to have
        only "cap" sleeves, fitting over the tight sleeves of the gown.

        FYI -- Other similar images are available at

        http://inky.library.yale.edu/medwomen/fashion.html

        especially

        http://inky.library.yale.edu/medwomen/04183126.html

        http://inky.library.yale.edu/medwomen/04183227.html

        Thanks again,

        Gillian Durham

        --- In Authentic_SCA@yahoogroups.com, >
        > "msgilliandurham" wrote:
        >
        > (snipped)
        > > I'm looking for more information on a German Renaissance
        garment --
        > > It's described in Janet Winter's Elizabethan Costuming as being
        a
        > > full circle cloak, hip length, with 2-piece sleeves. She says
        in
        > > England it was only worn by men, but in Germany it was
        sometimes
        > > worn by women as well.

        --- In Authentic_SCA@yahoogroups.com, "hunyddthered"
        <mel_elliott100@h...> wrote:
        > Do mean something like this?
        >
        > http://www.marquise.de/en/1500/weigel/wgl20.shtml
        >
        > It's not quite a cloak, but it is a full bodied short jacket (and
        is
        > sooooo cute! how could you NOT want to make one!)
        >
        > Cheers,
        > Hunydd
      • msgilliandurham
        Ha! I found it! (the picture, that is) There s a small picture of it at http://www.thrednedlestrete.com/Images/ruffapes.gif I did a Web Goodle search, instead
        Message 3 of 12 , Mar 29, 2005
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          Ha! I found it! (the picture, that is)

          There's a small picture of it at

          http://www.thrednedlestrete.com/Images/ruffapes.gif

          I did a Web Goodle search, instead of an image Google search,
          and found it mentioned in an archive at sca.uwaterloo.ca, apparently
          of the H-COST listserv. (specifically
          http://sca.uwaterloo.ca/~fashion/archives/hcos98/98-06.mbx.cl)

          Here a "joan m jurancich" says

          "On page 228 of "QE's Wardrobe Unlock'd", there's a wonderful
          engraving of "Monkeys 'apeing' the fashion, starching and setting
          linen ruffs, using setting sticks. Engraving, c. 1570. British
          Museum, London."[that's the caption in the book, don't blame me!]"

          And a little farther down in the archive, a "Joycelyn Falsken" says

          "Yes, the cartoon is of monkeys dressed in Elizabethan garb
          laundering, starching and pressing neck ruffs. The caption under the
          picture states: "Crispin Van de Passe I (after Van der
          Borcht), "Starch House" engraving. By permission of the trustees of
          the British Museum." dated 1570. [...] It's in a book
          called, "Fashioning Femininity" by Karen Newman and addresses
          amongst other topics, "Dressing Up: Sartorial Extravagance in Early
          Modern London".

          Couldn't get anything off the British Museum website, sadly. I'm
          trying to track down the "Fashioning Femininity" book.

          My memory of it in "Unlock'd" (I *knew* I'd seen it somewhere besides
          the cartoon I had in hand!!) is that it a small image as well.

          <sigh>

          Gillian [who is really going to have to get across the pond one of
          these days] Durham

          --- In Authentic_SCA@yahoogroups.com, "wodeford" <wodeford@y...>
          wrote:
          > Rats! I was going to ask if you could point me at an image for my
          > medieval monkey collection!
        • wodeford
          ... Thanks! The British Museum also owns the Saru no Soshi featuring fashionable 16th century Japanese monkeys. The entire handscroll can be seen at:
          Message 4 of 12 , Mar 30, 2005
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