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"Woven Into The Earth" - 'upright seams'?

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  • Terri Morgan
    For those of you who have been reading the new english version of Woven into the Earth , I have a question or two. Do you know what the author means by
    Message 1 of 7 , Jan 2, 2005
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      For those of you who have been reading the new english version of "Woven
      into the Earth", I have a question or two. Do you know what the author means
      by "upright seams" in her descriptive? A-n-d... "stab stitching". I'm
      guessing that "stab stitching is a standard backstitch but I'm also thinking
      that my Nyquil may be leading me to misinterpret the diagram. Could someone
      not on cold medication tell me if they agree?


      Hrothny
    • Maggie Forest
      Hrothny, I ve had the danish edition for a while, and have done quite a bit of playing with the types of stitching. I m not entirely sure which stitch she
      Message 2 of 7 , Jan 2, 2005
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        Hrothny,

        I've had the danish edition for a while, and have done quite a bit of
        playing with the types of stitching. I'm not entirely sure which
        stitch she translates to 'upright seams' - could you give me a bit
        more on where in the text this is?

        'stab stitch' is probably what we call 'prick stygn', a decorative
        form of top stitching. it's not back stitch, it's done more like a
        figure eight that means that each stitch lies very close to the
        previous one, making it look remarkably like a machine stitch if done
        well... It's used in folk costume stitching as well. As usual it's one
        of those things I could show you in ten seconds...

        /maggie
      • Jenn
        Maggie: Where is a teleporter when we need it? My handstitching is rather non-existent & what there is of it is poor, as is my embroidery. However, I have a
        Message 3 of 7 , Jan 2, 2005
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          Maggie: Where is a teleporter when we need it? My handstitching is
          rather non-existent & what there is of it is poor, as is my embroidery.
          However, I have a pattern from an Icelandic altar frontal that is
          inspiration!
          It would be so nice to get a bunch of ladies & gentlemen together for a
          week......... Jennifer [Ælfgifu]
          [Yseult, are you listening? I'll lend you my broom, if you need one...]
        • Terri Morgan
          Sorry about starting a conversation and then disappearing - the doc, the bed, and my sinuses (not in that order) are to blame. Give me a cold and my brain
          Message 4 of 7 , Jan 5, 2005
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            Sorry about starting a conversation and then disappearing - the doc, the
            bed, and my sinuses (not in that order) are to blame. Give me a cold and my
            brain shuts down...

            I found that I had two pages tuck together and after reading the nice
            messages explaining "stab stitch" I went back to the book to look again and
            there was a great diagram of the technique on page 100 showing the way that
            the needle needs to be manipulated. Since it ends up looking like the
            double-running-stitch but only takes one "pass", I wonder how much thread it
            saves. (Idle thought)

            Maggie Forest wrote:
            > I've had the danish edition for a while, and have done
            > quite a bit ofvcplaying with the types of stitching.
            > I'm not entirely sure which stitch she translates to
            > 'upright seams' - could you give me a bit more on where
            > in the text this is?

            Maggie, oh to have the ability to read in the original! Okay, now that I can
            go back to the book and read again (it's been two days of no reading. Oh,
            the pain!), in her discussion of Garment Type Ib, Norland 38 (starting on
            p160 in "Woven in the earth"), Ms. Ostergard wrote:
            "Tablet-woven piped edging: Below,
            the garment is bordered with a 12mm
            wide singling. There is also a 7mm
            narrow strip of tablet-woven
            piped edging, three rows on the
            right side with a couple of twisted
            (filler) threads laid under the stitch-
            es on the back, parallel to the
            cut-off edge. Some of the lengthwise
            seams have two rows of tablet-woven
            piped edging, while others have an
            ordinary seam and overcast
            stitching, so that the seams are
            "upright".
            Finally there are seams where
            the overcast stitches sew the seam
            allowance down to the cloth."

            There is no drawing or photo to illustrate the "upright" seam.

            Again, on p. 182, in the discussion of Norland 45, under "Tabletwoven piped
            edging", she writes:
            "The lengthwise seams are sewn either
            with tablet-woven piped edging or
            with running stitches and over-
            casting of the seam allowance with
            a thick (filler) thread laid under the
            stitches. Some of the 9mm wide
            seam allowance is 'upright'."

            I think that there's a few more examples in there, but you can see my
            confusion. I'm thinking that this would mean that the seam allowance is
            overcast, perhaps rolled, to resemble a piped seam, although doing that
            inside the garment seems odd. But then, so does putting all the pretty
            herringbone stitches on the inside of the seams on that Birka find (? was
            that the Birka find?) seems odd too, so *shrug* there is that...

            Hrothny, running out of steam
          • Maggie Forest
            ... no - what she means is that the seam allowances are not caught down to either side of the seam, as they are when overcast/caught, or tablet/sewn. If you
            Message 5 of 7 , Jan 6, 2005
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              >I think that there's a few more examples in there, but you can see my
              >confusion. I'm thinking that this would mean that the seam allowance is
              >overcast, perhaps rolled, to resemble a piped seam, although doing that
              >inside the garment seems odd. But then, so does putting all the pretty
              >herringbone stitches on the inside of the seams on that Birka find (? was
              >that the Birka find?) seems odd too, so *shrug* there is that...

              no - what she means is that the seam allowances are not caught down to
              either side of the seam, as they are when overcast/caught, or
              tablet/sewn. If you check the diagrams on page 99 (in my copy),
              there's one - fig. 66 - which shows the direction of the sewing down
              of seam allowances on #38. While the folds of the gown are forced to
              fold gracefully by pushing the seam allowances in a specific
              direction, the centre seams of the gussets and the side seams are left
              'standing', or loose, so that they kind of disappear.

              Not entirely instinctive, I know... She showed me this feature of the
              seam allowances being used to control the fall of the fabric when I
              visited Brede, so I'm pretty sure this is what she intends to tell us
              in the book.

              /maggie
            • Terri Morgan
              ... /maggie Ha! Got it! I do that with my linen gowns sometimes after I ve sewn the seam. Do the raw edges of the seam allowance get tucked in before
              Message 6 of 7 , Jan 6, 2005
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                > What she means is that the seam allowances are
                > not caught down to either side of the seam, as
                > they are when overcast/caught, or tablet/sewn.
                > If you check the diagrams on page 99 (in my copy),
                > there's one - fig. 66 - which shows the direction
                > of the sewing down of seam allowances on #38.
                > While the folds of the gown are forced to
                > fold gracefully by pushing the seam allowances in
                > a specific direction, the centre seams of the
                > gussets and the side seams are left 'standing',
                > or loose, so that they kind of disappear.
                <snip>
                /maggie

                Ha! Got it! I do that with my linen gowns sometimes after I've sewn the
                seam. Do the raw edges of the seam allowance get "tucked in" before the
                overcasting? I know in wool that's not so important but I consider it
                essential in ravelly-linen so it's intellectual curiosity. It does seem to
                help seam disappear into the gown from the outside. (That sentence doesn't
                scan well out loud, so don't read this to anyone!)
                I assuming that it's basically the same seam finishing shown on page 100
                of the new English edition as "figure 70", except that there's no piping
                involved in the "upright seam".

                Thank you Maggie!


                Hrothny of the cleared forehead wrinkles
              • Soeur Ysobel de Montfaucon
                Soeur Isabel, please trim your posts. Thank you. THE MODERATOR Could you compare that with a Hong Kong seam??
                Message 7 of 7 , Jan 6, 2005
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                  Soeur Isabel, please trim your posts.

                  Thank you.
                  THE MODERATOR


                  Could you compare that with a Hong Kong seam??
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