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Re: Green & other colors

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  • Marybeth Lavrakas
    I almost posted earlier, got distracted, then saw a question about emerald green. So, here goes--- A dyers handbook of the 16th C noted that to get a really
    Message 1 of 4 , Oct 25, 2004
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      I almost posted earlier, got distracted, then saw a
      question about "emerald" green. So, here goes---

      A dyers handbook of the 16th C noted that to get a
      really good dark green you needed to start with a very
      saturated yellow from weld. For lighter greens, start
      with less saturated yello. I've only tried this on
      silk, but I got the most amazing, rich, deep green
      starting with screaming yellow from weld (really, it
      does come out the color of yellow plastic trashbag
      handles). Whether or not these greens would match your
      definition of 'emerald', I just can't say. I also
      don't know if the application of a brightener, such as
      tin, would affect the resulting green, but it was used
      with reds. (The same dye manual includes a recipe
      w/instructions on using tin lined pot, although using
      tin as an additive isn't documented til early 17th C).

      As for other colors, use statements about symbolism,
      etc, with caution. I think Janet Arnold talks about it
      in QEWUnlocked.

      And I'm glad Gregory already posted about
      Greensleeves!

      KR


      =====
      Lady Kateryn Rous, CP
      House Broussard
      Windmasters Hill
      http://sca.livingpast.com
    • wodeford
      Keep in mind that color symbolism varies widely in different times and places. The imperial courts of China and Japan used color to indicate the rank of (male)
      Message 2 of 4 , Oct 25, 2004
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        Keep in mind that color symbolism varies widely in different times
        and places. The imperial courts of China and Japan used color to
        indicate the rank of (male) officials - IIRC, Sei Shonagon speaks of
        chamberlains of the sixth rank wearing green, for example. Early
        Japanese sources often speak of "forbidden colors" restricted to the
        use of the emperor or empress, that one might be given special
        permission to wear as a sign of royal favor. In Europe, particular
        colors and/or items of clothing were also used to identify Jews,
        courtesans or prostitutes, etc. Was it yellow veils for Venetian
        courtesans that I'm remembering?

        Tuppenceworth,
        Jehanne
      • phoenissa@netscape.net
        Yes, yellow for Venetian prostitutes, and possibly in Florence as well? I wish I still had those references handy...but again, like many sumptuary laws, the
        Message 3 of 4 , Oct 25, 2004
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          Yes, yellow for Venetian prostitutes, and possibly in Florence as well?
          I wish I still had those references handy...but again, like many
          sumptuary laws, the rules could be bent in special cases (though only, I
          imagine, for courtesans of higher status). Oh, wait, I just remembered
          why there's a record of that law in Florence -- it was for Tullia
          D'Aragona, famed poetess-prostitute, that the rule about the yellow
          veils was rescinded.


          Vittoria

          wodeford@... wrote:

          > In Europe, particular
          >colors and/or items of clothing were also used to identify Jews,
          >courtesans or prostitutes, etc. Was it yellow veils for Venetian
          >courtesans that I'm remembering?
          >
          >Tuppenceworth,
          >Jehanne
          >
          >
        • julian wilson
          Dear Listers following this thread I can confirm that yellow was worn by whores in the medieval Island of Jersey, as a distinguishing colour. This is also
          Message 4 of 4 , Oct 26, 2004
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            Dear Listers following this thread
            I can confirm that yellow was worn by whores in the medieval Island of Jersey, as a distinguishing colour. This is also likely to have been true for Guernsey, Sark, & Alderney, the other Anglo-Norman Isles. However, whether this was Tradition, or whether it was legally-imposed by the Bailiff & Jurats of the Royal Court of The States of Jersey, I know not - having had no reason to research the subject any further. The Sumptuary Laws of the Realm of England were never ratified in this little corner of the Kings' personal Estates, for some reason; - so it may well have been simply Norman & Breton Customs hardening into a local Tradition, and then acquiring almost the force of Jersey Law - while did NOT follow slavishly that of the English Mainland.. The Anglo-Norman Isles have had their very own Statutes, time-out-of-mind; and continue to so so..
            Julian,
            Historian & Master Artisan to
            The Companie fo The Duke's Leopards,
            Jersey's only medieval living-history Group.

            phoenissa@... wrote:
            Yes, yellow for Venetian prostitutes, and possibly in Florence as well?
            I wish I still had those references handy...but again, like many sumptuary laws, the rules could be bent in special cases (though only, I imagine, for courtesans of higher status). Oh, wait, I just remembered why there's a record of that law in Florence -- it was for Tullia D'Aragona, famed poetess-prostitute, that the rule about the yellow veils was rescinded.


            Vittoria

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