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lacing help

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  • Lady_Lark_Azure
    Hi all. I m working on the eyelets for a kirtle and I am down to the last one, just above the waistline. Because it s at a corner and the seam allowances for
    Message 1 of 4 , Sep 3 10:28 AM
      Hi all.

      I'm working on the eyelets for a kirtle and I am down to the last
      one, just above the waistline. Because it's at a corner and the seam
      allowances for both the center front and the waistline are there,
      there is a lot of fabric to get through.

      Anyone have any suggestions that would make it easier? To take out
      any excess fabric would require taking out the stitching on the
      lining which I'm trying to avoid. Part of me is tempted to not put
      an eyelet there and just put a heavy duty hook and eye in (I've
      already done 16 eyelets and that's just one side--the disadvantage of
      being 6'1"). I have a feeling I'll be taking out those lining
      stitches, but figured I'd ask for ideas first.

      Thanks,
      Isabeau
    • Julie Stackable, SCA Margaret Hepburn
      Generally when I have to do eyelets through a several layers, I end up having to stab straight down, completely perpendicular to the fabric, going in and
      Message 2 of 4 , Sep 4 9:08 AM
        Generally when I have to do eyelets through a several layers, I end
        up having to stab straight down, completely perpendicular to the
        fabric, going in and coming out & then arrange my thread to make
        sure it looks right. Because of the thickness, I am not able to
        just 'tug' the threads in place, but have to mess with them a
        little. It takes longer than doing the regular eyelets, but
        hopefully you should only have to do two like this....
        Margaret Hepburn
        --- In Authentic_SCA@yahoogroups.com, "Lady_Lark_Azure"
        <jenniferanne21@n...> wrote:
        > Hi all.
        >
        > I'm working on the eyelets for a kirtle and I am down to the last
        > one, just above the waistline. Because it's at a corner and the
        seam
        > allowances for both the center front and the waistline are there,
        > there is a lot of fabric to get through.
        >
        > Anyone have any suggestions that would make it easier? To take
        out
        > any excess fabric would require taking out the stitching on the
        > lining which I'm trying to avoid. Part of me is tempted to not
        put
        > an eyelet there and just put a heavy duty hook and eye in (I've
        > already done 16 eyelets and that's just one side--the disadvantage
        of
        > being 6'1"). I have a feeling I'll be taking out those lining
        > stitches, but figured I'd ask for ideas first.
        >
        > Thanks,
        > Isabeau
      • skittles_sheik
        I would suggest a leather needle (glover s needle). It has a tri- point end to make a semi-awl/semi-blade surface at the end. As the name implies they are for
        Message 3 of 4 , Sep 5 7:03 AM
          I would suggest a leather needle (glover's needle). It has a tri-
          point end to make a semi-awl/semi-blade surface at the end. As the
          name implies they are for working with leather, to punch through it
          since leather doesn't have any fibers to sneak through.

          I used them to great effect when repairing fur coats, but I also
          would sometimes cheat and use them for many layers of fabric (like
          denim jeans at the sideseam/pocket/waistband join. They will cut the
          fibers a little bit, but only where you shove the needle through.

          And, it would probably help on your other 17 eyelets.

          I thought that they would be difficult to get (I always just used
          the ones at work) but a google search (glover's needles) brings up
          several retailers. As to size, for your project I would suggest a
          size 5 needle-they range from 1 (largest, size of a toothpick) to I
          think 25 (tiny tiny needle that generally just bends).

          Also, a thimble is one of the best tools you can have on your side.
          I hated them, but got used to it. If you don't like metal ones, a
          pasable substitute is to tape several layers of demin onto your
          finger/thumb with something along the lines of waterproof tape.

          Hope this helps,
          elizabeth

          --- In Authentic_SCA@yahoogroups.com, "Lady_Lark_Azure"
          <jenniferanne21@n...> wrote:
          > Hi all.
          >
          > I'm working on the eyelets for a kirtle and I am down to the last
          > one, just above the waistline. Because it's at a corner and the
          seam
          > allowances for both the center front and the waistline are there,
          > there is a lot of fabric to get through.
          >
          > Anyone have any suggestions that would make it easier? To take
          out
          > any excess fabric would require taking out the stitching on the
          > lining which I'm trying to avoid. Part of me is tempted to not
          put
          > an eyelet there and just put a heavy duty hook and eye in (I've
          > already done 16 eyelets and that's just one side--the disadvantage
          of
          > being 6'1"). I have a feeling I'll be taking out those lining
          > stitches, but figured I'd ask for ideas first.
          >
          > Thanks,
          > Isabeau
        • ranvaig@columbus.rr.com
          ... Its too late this time, but learn to grade the seams, that is, trim each layer to a different width. And cut the seam allowances nearly to a miter at the
          Message 4 of 4 , Sep 5 8:55 PM
            >Hi all.
            >
            >I'm working on the eyelets for a kirtle and I am down to the last
            >one, just above the waistline. Because it's at a corner and the seam
            >allowances for both the center front and the waistline are there,
            >there is a lot of fabric to get through.
            >
            Its too late this time, but learn to grade the seams, that is, trim
            each layer to a different width. And cut the seam allowances nearly
            to a miter at the corner, so there aren't so many layers. It will
            make the corner look better too.

            Something like this:

            | | |
            | | |________
            | |/_________
            |/___________

            Ranvaig
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