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Re: [Authentic_SCA] Re: HELP!! Bright Blue Wool!!

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  • Willow Polson
    ... Also be sure to get any extra cloth and dye it at the same time so that it s the exact same color if she needs to make repairs.
    Message 1 of 8 , Aug 31, 2004
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      At 12:13 AM 9/1/2004 +0000, you wrote:

      >Can you obtain a scrap, or several, of the wool, other than from her
      >jacket? If you can, use these pieces to test. Tea stains are a pain
      >to remove if you don't like the results; it's best to be certain of
      >what your results are likely to be before using this on the jacket.

      Also be sure to get any extra cloth and dye it at the same time so that
      it's the exact same color if she needs to make repairs.


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    • neimhaille
      ... made ... made ... Is there an issue with this colour not being appropriate for the particular era? I ask as there are some pretty darned vivid blues in
      Message 2 of 8 , Sep 1, 2004
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        > OK (slightly modified from a Janet Arnold pattern) but, she has
        made
        > it from a very bright, almost electric blue wool. She has also
        made
        > thread covered buttons for it with embroidery thread of the same
        > color. I'm wondering if there is any way tone this thing down or
        > darken it without damaging the fabric or the buttons.

        Is there an issue with this colour not being appropriate for the
        particular era? I ask as there are some pretty darned vivid blues in
        tapestries, 500 years after they were made;) 17thC isn't my forte but
        I have also seen some nice blues in paintings.. Again , not my forte
        and I'm not even aware of your particular needs for your group.

        I really wouldn't tea dye. I've heard some nice horror stories of
        things being broken down over time. It's certainly not advised for
        heirloom pieces anyway. Apparently there is a way to neutralise the
        acid, but honestly I'd rather just use a safe purpose created dye;)

        The acid might not affect the wool (that's why the ground is silk and
        the pile rayon for chiffon velvet to be acid etched after all) but
        the thread for the buttons probably will.

        She might get good results using a dye which is made for both protein
        and cellulose based fibres (like Dylon), so it should dye the wool
        and the thread. Use a colour from the other side of the colour
        wheel.. thing.. Complimentary colours should muddy the tone a bit, so
        that should be an orange toned dye.

        Of course, testing on scraps is paramount and much more diluted than
        usual so she doesn't get brown, but a less vibrant blue.

        She could also go over with black and deepen the colour to a midnight
        blue. Maybe even navy...

        Lady Willemyne (the vibrant.. orange, teal, sunshine yellow... though
        not all at once;) )
        http://costumes.glittersweet.com
      • arrahateck
        Thanks to all for the suggestions on toning down the blue wool. I had not even thought about tea or coffee. The 18th century frontier part of me jumped
        Message 3 of 8 , Sep 3, 2004
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          Thanks to all for the suggestions on toning down the blue wool. I
          had not even thought about tea or coffee. The 18th century frontier
          part of me jumped straight to walnut hulls. I will apprise her of
          the possible danger of the tannic acid breaking down the fabric over
          time. Not sure how long that might be. Our clothing sees some
          rather hard usage anyway, so it may not be an issue. To answer
          the "Why not bright electric blue?", we are a 17th century New World
          frontier settlement (1611 - 1622). Our staff portrays the labouring
          classes in that harsh setting (though there are a few peacocks among
          our volunteer reenactors!). The thread buttons are her first
          attempt. If the embroidery thread breaks down, I will recommend she
          try again with black or some other more subdued color. I'm tickled
          pink about the thread buttons anyway.

          Take care,
          Pete McKee
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