Loading ...
Sorry, an error occurred while loading the content.

medicinal stuff

Expand Messages
  • Heidi/Clarissa
    Mundanely, I work as an RN on a hospital unit that deals with LOTS of yucky infected leg/foot wounds, mostly on diabetics who haven t taken care of themselves
    Message 1 of 7 , Jul 1 2:44 PM
    • 0 Attachment
      Mundanely, I work as an RN on a hospital unit that deals with LOTS of yucky
      infected leg/foot wounds, mostly on diabetics who haven't taken care of
      themselves properly (but not always, and not meant as a slam toward the
      lady who initially posted the question). We use acetic acid (aka vinegar)
      dressings fairly often. We also use "Dakin's solution" dressings, which
      is a fancy name for a very dilute bleach solution (yes, that's bleach, just
      like you use on laundry or for rinsing dishes while camping). Years and
      years ago, I had a patient who had a particularly nasty surgical wound on
      her vulva, for which we used honey as part of the dressing. The theory was
      that the honey, applied thickly, both covered the wound and prevented air
      from reaching it (which kills off the aerobic bacteria) and was more
      enticing to said bacteria than the wound itself. I haven't seen this used
      since, but I don't know if it's just because it's really messy and a lot of
      work for hte nurses or if it's fallen out of favor for other reasons.

      My chemistry-degree husband says he will investigate bleach later this
      evening and see if it's something that could've been made using period
      technology. Not to say that they did, but at least we'd know if they could.

      Clarissa
    • julian wilson
      My wife, an RN of over 40 years experience, is following this thread with great interest, and tells me that maggots [which no-one has mentioned so far - or if
      Message 2 of 7 , Jul 2 9:35 AM
      • 0 Attachment
        My wife, an RN of over 40 years experience, is following this thread with great interest, and tells me that maggots [which no-one has mentioned so far - or if they have we've missed the mention] - are still occasionally used for debriding necrotic tissue from wounds and sores. And this is in the "developed World", too!

        In Service,
        Matthieu Besquer,
        Re-enactor, Master Artisan, & Historian to
        "The Company of The Dukes Leopards",
        in "olde" Jersey, 15 miles off the Breton coast.
        [well, where did you think NEW Jersey was founded from?]

        MODERATOR NOTE: PLEASE SNIP PREVIOUS POSTS
      • Madonna Apollonia Margherita degli Albiz
        My mother used to work in the Virginia VA (Veteran s) Hospital. They had a homeless vet who needed a cast from the knee down. He was told to come back in 6-8
        Message 3 of 7 , Jul 2 12:47 PM
        • 0 Attachment
          My mother used to work in the Virginia VA (Veteran's) Hospital. They had a
          homeless vet who needed a cast from the knee down. He was told to come back
          in 6-8 weeks to have the cast taken off. He came back a year later, cast
          still on, to get it taken off as it was itching. The only reason he was not
          dead from the huge gangrene infection was because the maggots had eaten the
          rotting flesh...

          Apollonia
          -----Original Message-----
          From: julian wilson [mailto:smnco37@...]
          Sent: Friday, July 02, 2004 12:36 PM
          To: Authentic_SCA@yahoogroups.com
          Subject: Re: [Authentic_SCA] medicinal stuff


          My wife, an RN of over 40 years experience, is following this thread with
          great interest, and tells me that maggots [which no-one has mentioned so
          far - or if they have we've missed the mention] - are still occasionally
          used for debriding necrotic tissue from wounds and sores. And this is in the
          "developed World", too!

          In Service,
          Matthieu Besquer,


          [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
        • Lady_Lark_Azure
          ... Okay, for those of us with vivid visual imaginations, could we please get gross-out alerts? I really didn t need to read that! Isabeau
          Message 4 of 7 , Jul 2 1:01 PM
          • 0 Attachment
            > He came back a year later, cast
            > still on, to get it taken off as it was itching.

            Okay, for those of us with vivid visual imaginations, could we please
            get "gross-out" alerts? I really didn't need to read that!

            Isabeau
          • Madonna Apollonia Margherita degli Albiz
            Sorry about that. I have heard this story and others, many times in my life, at the dinner table. My parents are in the medical profession, and I ve gotten
            Message 5 of 7 , Jul 2 1:07 PM
            • 0 Attachment
              Sorry about that. I have heard this story and others, many times in my
              life, at the dinner table. My parents are in the medical profession, and
              I've gotten kind of immune to this stuff...

              Apollonia
              -----Original Message-----
              From: Lady_Lark_Azure [mailto:jenniferanne21@...]
              Sent: Friday, July 02, 2004 4:02 PM
              To: Authentic_SCA@yahoogroups.com
              Subject: [Authentic_SCA] Re: medicinal stuff


              Okay, for those of us with vivid visual imaginations, could we please
              get "gross-out" alerts? I really didn't need to read that!

              Isabeau




              [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
            • bex_1014
              Hello: Leeches are also occasionally used today as well - and were so commonly used in the MA that in some places the leech was the name for the doctor.
              Message 6 of 7 , Jul 4 7:58 PM
              • 0 Attachment
                Hello:
                Leeches are also occasionally used today as well - and were so
                commonly used in the MA that in some places the "leech" was the name
                for the doctor.
                Rebecca
              • Christopher Bogs
                Leeches were always my favorite thing to receive, when I worked on the shipping/receiving dock at a medical center. These days they come in sterile pouches,
                Message 7 of 7 , Jul 6 7:01 AM
                • 0 Attachment
                  Leeches were always my favorite thing to receive, when I worked on the
                  shipping/receiving dock at a medical center. These days they come in
                  sterile pouches, packed in lots of styrofoam. A far cry from going down to
                  your local pond!

                  Yrs.,
                  Christoph


                  -----Original Message-----
                  From: bex_1014 [mailto:tonkin.rebecca@...]
                  Sent: Sunday, July 04, 2004 10:58 PM
                  To: Authentic_SCA@yahoogroups.com
                  Subject: [Authentic_SCA] Re: medicinal stuff


                  Hello:
                  Leeches are also occasionally used today as well - and were so
                  commonly used in the MA that in some places the "leech" was the name
                  for the doctor.
                  Rebecca
                Your message has been successfully submitted and would be delivered to recipients shortly.