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Re: Medical treatments

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  • aheilvei
    ... love to know. ... My grandmother always used this stuff called black salve and that s what it was.. a salve that was black as midnight. It was sometimes
    Message 1 of 27 , Jun 30, 2004
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      > And if you can think of other ways to draw out an infection, I'd
      love to know.
      >
      >

      My grandmother always used this stuff called 'black salve' and
      that's what it was.. a salve that was black as midnight. It was
      sometimes called 'drawing salve' because it drew out infection as
      well as particles that may have been caught in the skin (bits of
      dirt that got deeply into a scratch and caused it to be infected, or
      splinters). I honestly would love to know the make up of this salve
      to have some on hand because it was pure *magic* within 48 hours of
      putting this stuff on (and keeping it on) nearly all infection and
      such was always gone from a wound.

      On the period front, Mistress Iasmine of the Middle Kingdom would be
      the person I would speak with on the topic of medicines and herbals.
      She knows more great period 'cures' than I can even imagine. You can
      find her email on the Middle Kingdom Laurel website (available off
      of the Middle Kingdom main webpage) or the Barony of Roaring Wastes
      website, as she is Baroness of that territory. Let us know what she
      gives you for 'cures'. (She's also one of the most gracious and kind
      people I've ever had the honor to call friend.)

      Smiles,
      Despina
    • Lady_Lark_Azure
      ... love ... When a nasty scrape got really infected when I was a kid, hot compresses drew the gunk to the surface and I then cleaned it with peroxide and
      Message 2 of 27 , Jun 30, 2004
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        > And if you can think of other ways to draw out an infection, I'd
        love
        > to know.

        When a nasty scrape got really infected when I was a kid, hot
        compresses drew the gunk to the surface and I then cleaned it with
        peroxide and covered it with Neosporin. Not period, but effective.

        Isabeau
      • Lyle H. Gray
        ... Search for black salve on www.google.com -- I found a number of references for it, including cross-references with Balm of Gilead and Bloodroot. -- Lyle
        Message 3 of 27 , Jun 30, 2004
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          On Wed, 30 Jun 2004, aheilvei wrote:

          > My grandmother always used this stuff called 'black salve'
          > and that's what it was.. a salve that was black as midnight.
          > It was sometimes called 'drawing salve' because it drew out
          > infection as well as particles that may have been caught in
          > the skin (bits of dirt that got deeply into a scratch and
          > caused it to be infected, or splinters). I honestly would
          > love to know the make up of this salve to have some on hand
          > because it was pure *magic* within 48 hours of putting this
          > stuff on (and keeping it on) nearly all infection and such
          > was always gone from a wound.

          Search for "black salve" on www.google.com -- I found a number of
          references for it, including cross-references with Balm of Gilead
          and Bloodroot.

          --
          Lyle H. Gray
          gray@... -- text only, please
          http://members.verizon.net/~vze3wwx7
          --
          Shared knowledge is preserved knowledge.
        • aheilvei
          ... I hadn t thought of that... and with all the googling I do! I d be interested in the cross references too - thanks for the great lead.
          Message 4 of 27 , Jun 30, 2004
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            > Search for "black salve" on www.google.com -- I found a number of
            > references for it, including cross-references with Balm of Gilead
            > and Bloodroot.
            >
            > --
            >

            <smacks forehead> I hadn't thought of that... and with all the
            googling I do! I'd be interested in the cross references too -
            thanks for the great lead.

            Smiles,
            Despina
          • Marion McNealy
            If you do a Google on black salve, you ll find several websites selling the stuff, along with testimonials and contents. Looks like it goes back about 150
            Message 5 of 27 , Jun 30, 2004
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              If you do a Google on black salve, you'll find several websites selling the stuff, along with testimonials and contents. Looks like it goes back about 150 years and is an alternative treatment for skin cancer, moles and all sorts of things.

              -Marion

              aheilvei <aheilvei@...> wrote:

              My grandmother always used this stuff called 'black salve' and
              that's what it was.. a salve that was black as midnight. It was
              sometimes called 'drawing salve' because it drew out infection as
              well as particles that may have been caught in the skin (bits of
              dirt that got deeply into a scratch and caused it to be infected, or
              splinters). I honestly would love to know the make up of this salve
              to have some on hand because it was pure *magic* within 48 hours of
              putting this stuff on (and keeping it on) nearly all infection and
              such was always gone from a wound.

              [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
            • pandoraf@verizon.net
              what about soaking in Epsom salts? in water hot as you can stand it for 15 minutes or so, a couple times a day - it will draw out any particles that are in the
              Message 6 of 27 , Jun 30, 2004
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                what about soaking in Epsom salts? in water hot as you can stand it for 15 minutes or so, a couple times a day - it will draw out any particles that are in the wound, and also help disinfect, I think.

                (not period, but it's what I did when I stepped on a rusty nail as a kid, and for various other scrapes/abrasions that were infected or threatened to be. )

                Crìnòc Triall
                Barony of Aquaterra
              • msgilliandurham
                ... honestly would love to know the make up of this salve ... Is this it? http://www.vermontcountrystore.com/prdSell.asp?ProdGroupID=26915 Hope this helps --
                Message 7 of 27 , Jun 30, 2004
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                  --- In Authentic_SCA@yahoogroups.com, "aheilvei" <aheilvei@u...>
                  wrote:
                  > My grandmother always used this stuff called 'black salve' and
                  > that's what it was.. a salve that was black as midnight. [...] I
                  honestly would love to know the make up of this salve
                  > to have some on hand because it was pure *magic* within 48 hours of
                  > putting this stuff on (and keeping it on) nearly all infection and
                  > such was always gone from a wound.

                  Is this it?

                  http://www.vermontcountrystore.com/prdSell.asp?ProdGroupID=26915

                  Hope this helps -- Gillian
                • aheilvei
                  ... That might be it. LOL! I m going to have the pervect presents for my sisters birthdays and holidays this year since I m going to wind up ordering several
                  Message 8 of 27 , Jun 30, 2004
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                    > Is this it?
                    >
                    > http://www.vermontcountrystore.com/prdSell.asp?ProdGroupID=26915
                    >
                    > Hope this helps -- Gillian

                    That might be it. LOL! I'm going to have the pervect presents for
                    my sisters birthdays and holidays this year since I'm going to wind
                    up ordering several variations of black salve. We've all been
                    looking for it for years. This is great - thanks everyone.

                    Smiles,
                    Despina
                  • ladymorwenna
                    ... That s what I had been doing, in addition to the vinegar compresses. It helped a great deal, up to a point. As it turns out, no sooner had I posted this
                    Message 9 of 27 , Jun 30, 2004
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                      > When a nasty scrape got really infected when I was a kid, hot
                      > compresses drew the gunk to the surface and I then cleaned it with
                      > peroxide and covered it with Neosporin. Not period, but effective.
                      >
                      > Isabeau

                      That's what I had been doing, in addition to the vinegar compresses.
                      It helped a great deal, up to a point.

                      As it turns out, no sooner had I posted this than my doctor called and
                      wants to start me on antibiotics after all.

                      Now, to turn this back to something back to something medieval.

                      A cure for rickets (vitimin D deficiency) was May butter, made by
                      putting butter out in the spring sunshine. Apparently the butter
                      absorbs vitamin D from the sunlight. Other herbs and stuff could be
                      mixed into the butter, but I don't know if that helped, hindered or
                      neither.

                      --Morwenna
                    • Lyle H. Gray
                      ... Doesn t butter already have vitamin D in it? Lyle -- Lyle H. Gray gray@cs.umass.edu -- text only, please http://members.verizon.net/~vze3wwx7 -- Shared
                      Message 10 of 27 , Jun 30, 2004
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                        On Wed, 30 Jun 2004, ladymorwenna wrote:

                        > A cure for rickets (vitimin D deficiency) was May butter,
                        > made by putting butter out in the spring sunshine. Apparently
                        > the butter absorbs vitamin D from the sunlight. Other herbs
                        > and stuff could be mixed into the butter, but I don't know if
                        > that helped, hindered or neither.

                        Doesn't butter already have vitamin D in it?

                        Lyle

                        --
                        Lyle H. Gray
                        gray@... -- text only, please
                        http://members.verizon.net/~vze3wwx7
                        --
                        Shared knowledge is preserved knowledge.
                      • Darcellena Hartmann
                        Regarding black salve , I don t know if it s the same substance as what you referred to, but there is presently on the market in America something called
                        Message 11 of 27 , Jun 30, 2004
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                          Regarding "black salve", I don't know if it's the same substance as what you
                          referred to, but there is presently on the market in America something
                          called "Boil Ease" that is supposed to draw boils. It's a very dark salve.
                          I'm pretty sure that this is the correct name.

                          Of course, I don't know if it would work for your sore and I'm not a doctor.
                          I'd suggest asking either your doctor or at least maybe the pharmacist if it
                          would be appropriate for your purposes.

                          Darcellena

                          ----- Original Message -----
                          To: <Authentic_SCA@yahoogroups.com>
                          Sent: Wednesday, June 30, 2004 11:44 AM
                          Subject: [Authentic_SCA] Re: Medical treatments


                          > My grandmother always used this stuff called 'black salve' and
                          > that's what it was.. a salve that was black as midnight. It was
                          > sometimes called 'drawing salve' because it drew out infection as
                          > well as particles that may have been caught in the skin (bits of
                          > dirt that got deeply into a scratch and caused it to be infected, or
                          > splinters).

                          (snip)
                        • wodeford
                          ... or ... This sounds like icthammol ointment, which looks like tar. I used to use it on my horse. It was great for tick bites when you thought the head was
                          Message 12 of 27 , Jun 30, 2004
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                            --- In Authentic_SCA@yahoogroups.com, "aheilvei" <aheilvei@u...>
                            wrote:
                            > My grandmother always used this stuff called 'black salve' and
                            > that's what it was.. a salve that was black as midnight. It was
                            > sometimes called 'drawing salve' because it drew out infection as
                            > well as particles that may have been caught in the skin (bits of
                            > dirt that got deeply into a scratch and caused it to be infected,
                            or
                            > splinters).

                            This sounds like icthammol ointment, which looks like tar. I used to
                            use it on my horse. It was great for tick bites when you thought the
                            head was still in the wound, splinters, etc.

                            Jehanne
                          • faena0216
                            Butter contains true vitamin A or retinol, vitamin D, vitamin K and vitamin E as well as all their naturally occurring cofactors needed to obtain maximum
                            Message 13 of 27 , Jun 30, 2004
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                              Butter contains "true vitamin A or retinol, vitamin D, vitamin K and
                              vitamin E as well as all their naturally occurring cofactors needed
                              to obtain maximum effect. Butter is America's best source of these
                              important nutrients. In fact, vitamin A is more easily absorbed and
                              utilized from butter than from other sources" from Nutr Week, Mar 22,
                              1991, 21:12:2-3

                              The best butter in terms of nutrition is that obtained from cattle
                              allowed to graze at will on pasture. the butter is extreamly yellow
                              in this case, not the near white we see in modern commercial
                              varieties. So the medieval population had much better nutrition,
                              actually, than we do.

                              I hold that many of the ills of today are caused by our poor eating
                              habbits, and from processed foods. Afterall, laborers worked from sun
                              up to sun down in the Medieval period, doing repetitive tasks, and
                              carpel tunnel syndrom is a new pehenomenon as are other ills.
                              Weavers, especially, do repetitive work (throwing the shuttle for
                              hours on end) and we hear about Weaver's Bottom but not any other
                              ailments.

                              Nancy M McKenna
                            • wulfy95113
                              One more thing that helps with infections is to increase your consumption of freindly bacteria (Acidolpholus, etc). Eating lots of live culture yogurt can
                              Message 14 of 27 , Jun 30, 2004
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                                One more thing that helps with infections is to increase your
                                consumption of "freindly bacteria" (Acidolpholus, etc). Eating lots
                                of "live culture yogurt" can do this, as well as taking various pills
                                & such available at Health Food Stores.

                                Yogurt was used "medicinally" during our period, AKAIK. Of course,
                                they didn't know about the bacteria, etc.

                                Wulfy
                              • Christopher Bogs
                                ... Aye, but throwing a shuttle and doing other types of medieval labour creates a very different repetetive motion than the sorts of tasks (namely typing)
                                Message 15 of 27 , Jun 30, 2004
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                                  >I hold that many of the ills of today are caused by our poor eating
                                  >habbits, and from processed foods. Afterall, laborers worked from sun
                                  >up to sun down in the Medieval period, doing repetitive tasks, and
                                  >carpel tunnel syndrom is a new pehenomenon as are other ills.
                                  >Weavers, especially, do repetitive work (throwing the shuttle for
                                  >hours on end) and we hear about Weaver's Bottom but not any other
                                  >ailments.

                                  Aye, but throwing a shuttle and doing other types of medieval labour creates
                                  a very different repetetive motion than the sorts of tasks (namely typing)
                                  that are the cause of today's RSIs like Carpal Tunnel. I don't think the
                                  wrist is involved nearly as much as the rest of the arm in throwing a
                                  shuttle, for example...

                                  Just an alternate reason why we might see the emergence of these ills after
                                  our period.

                                  Yrs.,
                                  Christoph
                                  ----------------------------------------
                                  Christopher Bogs | Christopher Jameson
                                  Philadelphia, PA | Barony of Bhakail, EK
                                  ----------------------------------------
                                  Don't tell my parents I'm in the SCA --
                                  They think I'm running guns for a biker gang.
                                • ladymorwenna
                                  ... I d never heard of that ailment before and I was in A Midsummer Night s Dream! Consider the day lost in which you learn nothing, as my Latin teacher used
                                  Message 16 of 27 , Jun 30, 2004
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                                    > Weavers, especially, do repetitive work (throwing the shuttle for
                                    > hours on end) and we hear about Weaver's Bottom but not any other
                                    > ailments.
                                    >
                                    > Nancy M McKenna

                                    I'd never heard of that ailment before and I was in A Midsummer
                                    Night's Dream! Consider the day lost in which you learn nothing, as my
                                    Latin teacher used to say.

                                    --Morwenna
                                    Played Titania, never got the joke
                                  • Cynthia J Ley
                                    ... Tried a warm soak in epsom salts? Arlys ________________________________________________________________ The best thing to hit the Internet in years - Juno
                                    Message 17 of 27 , Jun 30, 2004
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                                      On Wed, 30 Jun 2004 15:44:01 -0000 "aheilvei" <aheilvei@...> writes:
                                      >
                                      > > And if you can think of other ways to draw out an infection, I'd
                                      > love to know.

                                      Tried a warm soak in epsom salts?

                                      Arlys

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                                    • Kareina Talvi Tytär
                                      ... [snip] Thank you! Ever since I moved to the Barony of Ynys Fawr in Lochac (Tasmania, Australia), I ve been wondering why the butter there is so very
                                      Message 18 of 27 , Jun 30, 2004
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                                        At 12:50 PM 6/30/04, Nancy M McKenna wrote:
                                        >[snip]
                                        >The best butter in terms of nutrition is that obtained from cattle
                                        >allowed to graze at will on pasture. the butter is extreamly yellow
                                        >in this case, not the near white we see in modern commercial
                                        >varieties. So the medieval population had much better nutrition,
                                        >actually, than we do.
                                        [snip]

                                        Thank you! Ever since I moved to the Barony of Ynys Fawr in Lochac
                                        (Tasmania, Australia), I've been wondering why the butter there is so very
                                        different from what I was used to in the US. Their butter is a fairly dark
                                        yellow and has a different texture--it doesn't get as soft when left at
                                        room temperature. Since one sees both cows and sheep grazing free all over
                                        the state, I suspect that your explanation is the heart of the difference!

                                        --Kareina

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                                      • wulfy95113
                                        They found some serious deformities in the skeletons of English Longbowmen... And you may have a point that many of our illnesses today are caused by poor
                                        Message 19 of 27 , Jun 30, 2004
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                                          They found some serious deformities in the skeletons of English
                                          Longbowmen...

                                          And you may have a point that many of our illnesses today are caused
                                          by poor eating, lack of exercise, etc- but that's only becuase we're
                                          not living long enough to get hit with them. Cancer killed few in
                                          the Middle ages- becuase few lived long enough for it to hit them.

                                          Wulfy

                                          --- In Authentic_SCA@yahoogroups.com, "Christopher Bogs" <cbogs@p...>
                                          wrote:
                                          > >I hold that many of the ills of today are caused by our poor
                                          eating
                                          > >habbits, and from processed foods. Afterall, laborers worked from
                                          sun
                                          > >up to sun down in the Medieval period, doing repetitive tasks, and
                                          > >carpel tunnel syndrom is a new pehenomenon as are other ills.
                                          > >Weavers, especially, do repetitive work (throwing the shuttle for
                                          > >hours on end) and we hear about Weaver's Bottom but not any other
                                          > >ailments.
                                          >
                                          > Just an alternate reason why we might see the emergence of these
                                          ills after
                                          > our period.
                                          >
                                          >
                                        • wulfy95113
                                          Sigh- corrected below- not not but now - changes the meaning entirely. ... caused ... we re ... in
                                          Message 20 of 27 , Jun 30, 2004
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                                            Sigh- corrected below- not "not" but "now"- changes the meaning
                                            entirely.

                                            --- In Authentic_SCA@yahoogroups.com, "wulfy95113" <wulfstand@s...>
                                            wrote:
                                            > They found some serious deformities in the skeletons of English
                                            > Longbowmen...
                                            >
                                            > And you may have a point that many of our illnesses today are
                                            caused
                                            > by poor eating, lack of exercise, etc- but that's only becuase
                                            we're
                                            > *now* living long enough to get hit with them. Cancer killed few
                                            in
                                            > the Middle ages- becuase few lived long enough for it to hit them.
                                            >
                                            > Wulfy
                                            >
                                            >
                                          • Mary Taran
                                            ... Carpal Tunnel isn t the only RSI out there. I ve developed what would be tennis elbow in my off-arm, if I played tennis, which I don t. The only thing we
                                            Message 21 of 27 , Jun 30, 2004
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                                              At 11:32 AM 6/30/2004, you wrote:
                                              >Aye, but throwing a shuttle and doing other types of medieval labour creates
                                              >a very different repetetive motion than the sorts of tasks (namely typing)
                                              >that are the cause of today's RSIs like Carpal Tunnel. I don't think the
                                              >wrist is involved nearly as much as the rest of the arm in throwing a
                                              >shuttle, for example...
                                              >
                                              >Just an alternate reason why we might see the emergence of these ills after
                                              >our period.

                                              Carpal Tunnel isn't the only RSI out there. I've developed what would be
                                              tennis elbow in my off-arm, if I played tennis, which I don't. The only
                                              thing we can figure out is that I grip and pull with my left arm large
                                              amounts of heavy fabric when I sew. For the time being, we're calling it
                                              "seamstress' elbow"!

                                              Mary Taran

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                                            • Cynthia J Ley
                                              US butters will sometimes have color additives. Arlys On Wed, 30 Jun 2004 14:24:53 -0700 Kareina Talvi =?iso-8859-1?Q?Tyt=E4r?= ...
                                              Message 22 of 27 , Jun 30, 2004
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                                                US butters will sometimes have color additives.

                                                Arlys

                                                On Wed, 30 Jun 2004 14:24:53 -0700 Kareina Talvi =?iso-8859-1?Q?Tyt=E4r?=
                                                <kareina@...> writes:
                                                > At 12:50 PM 6/30/04, Nancy M McKenna wrote:
                                                > >[snip]
                                                > >The best butter in terms of nutrition is that obtained from cattle
                                                > >allowed to graze at will on pasture. the butter is extreamly yellow
                                                > >in this case, not the near white we see in modern commercial
                                                > >varieties. So the medieval population had much better nutrition,
                                                > >actually, than we do.


                                                ________________________________________________________________
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                                              • bex_1014
                                                Hello: I have heard that honey was used in medieval times to treat cuts, sores etc. It is also used today:
                                                Message 23 of 27 , Jun 30, 2004
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                                                  Hello:
                                                  I have heard that honey was used in medieval times to treat cuts,
                                                  sores etc. It is also used today:
                                                  http://www.worldwidewounds.com/2001/november/Molan/honey-as-topical-
                                                  agent.html
                                                  (Hope that link comes through.)
                                                  Regards,
                                                  Rebecca
                                                • bex_1014
                                                  Hi: Butter contains Vitamin D, and humans manufacture Vitamin D when exposed to sunlight on the skin. So putting butter out into sunshine would increase your
                                                  Message 24 of 27 , Jun 30, 2004
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                                                    Hi:
                                                    Butter contains Vitamin D, and humans manufacture Vitamin D when
                                                    exposed to sunlight on the skin. So putting butter out into sunshine
                                                    would increase your Vitamin D levels, especially if you also ate the
                                                    butter, but the butter isn't absorbing D from sunlight. Sunlight is
                                                    just energy. :-)
                                                    Also, the nutrient content of butter in May would be better since the
                                                    cows would be grazing on fresh pasture, not months-old hay.
                                                    And if that doesn't work, take some cod liver oil... :-P
                                                    Rebecca


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                                                  • Tiffany Brown / Lady Teffania Tukerton
                                                    ... So do some australian butters, but thankfully not many. You can get a difference in colour and taste of the butter within the variety of brands available
                                                    Message 25 of 27 , Jun 30, 2004
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                                                      --- In Authentic_SCA@yahoogroups.com, Cynthia J Ley <cley@j...> wrote:
                                                      > US butters will sometimes have color additives.

                                                      So do some australian butters, but thankfully not many.

                                                      You can get a difference in colour and taste of the butter within the
                                                      variety of brands available in austalia. Some have "stong" tastes,
                                                      others especially "danish style" are much milder. I suspect there are
                                                      minor variations in the way butter can be processed and also in the
                                                      fat content of the butter (our butter gets more yellow as it tends
                                                      toward rancid).

                                                      We have a few butters that are specially designed to be soft at the
                                                      temperature of the fridge, which may be the norm in america. I think
                                                      traditional (ie 1900) english behavour was to leave some butter out on
                                                      the bench, but that really doesn't work on 30C days. (hence slightly
                                                      warmer butter compartments in refrigerators)

                                                      Besides that, pasture types can definately change dairy products - we
                                                      can taste when the capeweed is in bloom, even in fairly processed
                                                      butters and milks.

                                                      By the way Kareina - investigate copha (clear almost tasteless
                                                      shortening from coconut oil)- I hear it's something you can't get
                                                      outside australia (no chocolate crackles :-( ). Not period, but fun.

                                                      So anyone an expert on medieval butter?


                                                      Teffania
                                                      (krae glas, lochac/Melbourne Austalia)

                                                      Who is horrified to think there are dairy cows out there who don't
                                                      have a nice big paddock to graze around in. I thought the sad
                                                      american grain fed beef phenomenon was only for meat cows.
                                                    • Hasoferet@aol.com
                                                      In a message dated 6/30/04 11:46:26 PM, tbro3@student.monash.edu.au writes:
                                                      Message 26 of 27 , Jul 1, 2004
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                                                        In a message dated 6/30/04 11:46:26 PM, tbro3@... writes:

                                                        << I think

                                                        traditional (ie 1900) english behavour was to leave some butter out on

                                                        the bench, but that really doesn't work on 30C days. (hence slightly

                                                        warmer butter compartments in refrigerators) >>

                                                        They still do in England, but I was born in Los Angeles, and assume that
                                                        anything left on the counter will start rotting in a minute...

                                                        Raquel

                                                        +____________________________________+
                                                        Do not beg. Do not refuse. Preserve. Bestow.

                                                        --Colman mac Beognae, 'The Alphabet of Devotion
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