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Re: [Authentic_SCA] Re: piecing

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  • kittencat3@aol.com
    ... Yes, I m well aware of the Guicciardini quilts (there are two, one in the Bargello in Florence and one in the V&A. And yes, they *are* two separate
    Message 1 of 77 , May 26, 2004
      In a message dated 5/25/2004 9:10:52 PM Eastern Daylight Time, willow@... writes:

      > If you are saying that they are quilted without piecing out of a single piece of fabric, this technique goes back further than that. A notable example is The Guicciardini Quilt from 1400.
      >

      Yes, I'm well aware of the Guicciardini quilts (there are two, one in the Bargello in Florence and one in the V&A. And yes, they *are* two separate quilts, according to quilt historian Susan Young, who examined the Bargello quilt in detail in 1993). A third from the same workshop was photographed before World War II and has since disappeared, while a reference in a French inventory of 1297 (see Berenson's Quilts of Provence)
      refers to a quilt "in the style of Sicily" depicting Alexander and Solomon (presumably the Matter of Antiquity). All these quilts were of linen stuffed with cotton and lined with linen, and worked with linen in an early form of trapunto, most likely by professionals. At least a dozen Italian cities had quilt guilds in the Middle Ages and Renaissance, including Venice, Rome, Bologna, and Florence (Mazzaoui, the Italian Cotton Industry in the Later Middle Ages).

      Wholecloth quilting goes back at least to the 1st century CE; there's a quilted rug from a Siberian tomb in St. Petersburg dating from around that time. And a Merovingian tomb from around the proved to contain a quilted wool funeral pall that was stuffed with cotton and quilted in a diamond pattern with cotton thread.


      There are two 16-17th century silk quilts at the Gardner Museum in Boston and one 16-17th century silk quilt at Winterthur in Delaware
      >
      > There is a large difference between the 16th and 17th
      > centuries. Where do these fall in the 200 year time span of 1500 - 1699?
      >
      Probably late 16th century. However, the style and imagery of these export quilts did not change much; a late 17th century example in the Wadsworth Atheneum is very similar in technique and style to the late 16th century ones in Winterthur and Cornwall. Maggie Lidz of Winterthur believes that the quilts were made over about a 150 year period in either Chios or possibly Goa. About a dozen survive, most likely because the silk used was lighter and of lesser quality than the fine Turkish silks of the period. See her article "The Mystery of 17th century Quilts" in the December 1997 issue of Antiques magazine; she also gave a lecture on the subject at the "In Search of Origins" symposium in Deerfield last fall, where she went into more detail about the late Renaissance origins of the quilts' imagery.

      Finally...there was some question as to whether pieced bed quilts existed in the SCA period. The answer is "possibly." Asa Wettre's =Old Swedish Quilts= mentions a pieced and appliqued silk quilt dated to 1303 that was owned by one of the Swedish queens. There are also several references in Henry VIII's inventory of 1547 to "green and white" silk quilts; these do not seem to have been shot silk, as shot silk textiles in the inventory were specifically identified as "chaungeable," and these quilts were not.

      Finally, there are some intriguing references in Henry's inventory that deserve to be quoted in full:

      "11809 - item three Counterpointes of *blewe and yellowe Sarconete payned togethers* quilted The ynsydes being of lynnen clothe stayned euerie one of theym being in lengthe three yardes di and in bredthe three yardes di quarter" (263)

      "11810 - item foure Counterpointes of *purple and white Sarceonet paned togethers* and quilted the ynsydes being of lynnen clothe stayned euerie one of theym being in lengthe three yardes di and in bredthe iij yardes di quarter"(263)

      "12809 - item Two quyltes of *yellow sarsenet with a border of grene sarcenet quylted* either of them conteynyge in lengeth iij yardes quarter and one of them in bredeth two yardes di good lyned with russet fustyan the other in bredeth two yardes quarter lyned with red buckeram" (301)


      Interesting stuff, even if I nearly went blind transcribing all the references....:)

      Sarah Davies
    • kittencat3@aol.com
      ... Yes, I m well aware of the Guicciardini quilts (there are two, one in the Bargello in Florence and one in the V&A. And yes, they *are* two separate
      Message 77 of 77 , May 26, 2004
        In a message dated 5/25/2004 9:10:52 PM Eastern Daylight Time, willow@... writes:

        > If you are saying that they are quilted without piecing out of a single piece of fabric, this technique goes back further than that. A notable example is The Guicciardini Quilt from 1400.
        >

        Yes, I'm well aware of the Guicciardini quilts (there are two, one in the Bargello in Florence and one in the V&A. And yes, they *are* two separate quilts, according to quilt historian Susan Young, who examined the Bargello quilt in detail in 1993). A third from the same workshop was photographed before World War II and has since disappeared, while a reference in a French inventory of 1297 (see Berenson's Quilts of Provence)
        refers to a quilt "in the style of Sicily" depicting Alexander and Solomon (presumably the Matter of Antiquity). All these quilts were of linen stuffed with cotton and lined with linen, and worked with linen in an early form of trapunto, most likely by professionals. At least a dozen Italian cities had quilt guilds in the Middle Ages and Renaissance, including Venice, Rome, Bologna, and Florence (Mazzaoui, the Italian Cotton Industry in the Later Middle Ages).

        Wholecloth quilting goes back at least to the 1st century CE; there's a quilted rug from a Siberian tomb in St. Petersburg dating from around that time. And a Merovingian tomb from around the proved to contain a quilted wool funeral pall that was stuffed with cotton and quilted in a diamond pattern with cotton thread.


        There are two 16-17th century silk quilts at the Gardner Museum in Boston and one 16-17th century silk quilt at Winterthur in Delaware
        >
        > There is a large difference between the 16th and 17th
        > centuries. Where do these fall in the 200 year time span of 1500 - 1699?
        >
        Probably late 16th century. However, the style and imagery of these export quilts did not change much; a late 17th century example in the Wadsworth Atheneum is very similar in technique and style to the late 16th century ones in Winterthur and Cornwall. Maggie Lidz of Winterthur believes that the quilts were made over about a 150 year period in either Chios or possibly Goa. About a dozen survive, most likely because the silk used was lighter and of lesser quality than the fine Turkish silks of the period. See her article "The Mystery of 17th century Quilts" in the December 1997 issue of Antiques magazine; she also gave a lecture on the subject at the "In Search of Origins" symposium in Deerfield last fall, where she went into more detail about the late Renaissance origins of the quilts' imagery.

        Finally...there was some question as to whether pieced bed quilts existed in the SCA period. The answer is "possibly." Asa Wettre's =Old Swedish Quilts= mentions a pieced and appliqued silk quilt dated to 1303 that was owned by one of the Swedish queens. There are also several references in Henry VIII's inventory of 1547 to "green and white" silk quilts; these do not seem to have been shot silk, as shot silk textiles in the inventory were specifically identified as "chaungeable," and these quilts were not.

        Finally, there are some intriguing references in Henry's inventory that deserve to be quoted in full:

        "11809 - item three Counterpointes of *blewe and yellowe Sarconete payned togethers* quilted The ynsydes being of lynnen clothe stayned euerie one of theym being in lengthe three yardes di and in bredthe three yardes di quarter" (263)

        "11810 - item foure Counterpointes of *purple and white Sarceonet paned togethers* and quilted the ynsydes being of lynnen clothe stayned euerie one of theym being in lengthe three yardes di and in bredthe iij yardes di quarter"(263)

        "12809 - item Two quyltes of *yellow sarsenet with a border of grene sarcenet quylted* either of them conteynyge in lengeth iij yardes quarter and one of them in bredeth two yardes di good lyned with russet fustyan the other in bredeth two yardes quarter lyned with red buckeram" (301)


        Interesting stuff, even if I nearly went blind transcribing all the references....:)

        Sarah Davies
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