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Re: Class suggestions?

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  • uxbridgefox
    ... A question I have as a new blackwork-er is how do you finish and start threads. When I do other embroidery work I weave the ends under the previous
    Message 1 of 14 , Feb 1, 2004
      > >when you first started doing blackwork? What do you think a new
      > >person absolutely needs to know?

      A question I have as a new blackwork-er is how do you finish and
      start threads. When I do other embroidery work I weave the ends
      under the previous stitiches. Is there a better way?

      Eleanor le Brun
    • beard5helgarth
      (snip) ... (snip) ... The one thing I wish I d been shown from the beginning, is what weight thread to use for the embroidery. Since I did my first piece in
      Message 2 of 14 , Feb 1, 2004
        (snip)
        > So, I have a request. If you have a moment and could be so kind,
        > might you post and let me know what you wish someone had told you
        > when you first started doing blackwork? What do you think a new
        > person absolutely needs to know?
        (snip)
        > Lady Beatrice Sidney

        The one thing I wish I'd been shown from the beginning, is what
        weight thread to use for the embroidery. Since I did my first piece
        in black silk sewing thread, and gave up since it just looked wrong.
        That would have been handy.

        Since then I've figured out what I'm doing with blackwork, thanks to
        some better books that suggest tatting weight cotton, or silk cord
        size A or B for finer work, and sizes D through FF for heavier
        weight. (This is the silk cording used for knotted pearl necklaces)

        Robert of Stonemarche
      • ladymorwenna
        ... I beg to disagree. This is an admirable goal for double-running stitch blackwork, but not something that needs to be impressed on a new stitcher at the
        Message 3 of 14 , Feb 2, 2004
          > >So, I have a request. If you have a moment and could be so kind,
          > >might you post and let me know what you wish someone had told you
          > >when you first started doing blackwork? What do you think a new
          > >person absolutely needs to know?
          >
          > Strive to make the back look as good as the front.
          >
          > Mary Taran

          I beg to disagree. This is an admirable goal for double-running stitch
          blackwork, but not something that needs to be impressed on a new
          stitcher at the very start. I've known too many novice embroiderers
          intimidated by the belief that the back needs to be as good as the
          front. Besides, if the embroidery is going to be used for a item that
          is lined, it's not so necessary.

          That being said, the one thing I wish I'd been taught right off is how
          to hide the beginning and ending threads to make neat and stable
          finishes on the back.

          --Morwenna
        • Jeff Gedney
          Yeah, I am dying to know how you finish the beginning and ends of a thread in blackwork... If I could get past that I might well give it a try. Capt Elias
          Message 4 of 14 , Feb 2, 2004
            Yeah, I am dying to know how you finish the beginning and ends of a thread in blackwork...
            If I could get past that I might well give it a try.

            Capt Elias
          • aheilvei
            ... I don t want to have a knot, but how can I secure the beginning thread without it showing? And is it okay for me to not have a knot or should I just suck
            Message 5 of 14 , Feb 2, 2004
              > So, I have a request. If you have a moment and could be so kind,
              > might you post and let me know what you wish someone had told you
              > when you first started doing blackwork? What do you think a new
              > person absolutely needs to know?

              I don't want to have a knot, but how can I secure the beginning
              thread without it showing? And is it okay for me to not have a knot
              or should I just suck it up and have a knot?

              Are spangles or beads ever incorporated in blackwork embroidery in
              SCA period?

              Sounds like a great class.

              Smiles,
              Despina
            • Kirrily Robert
              ... The quick answer is weave them through/under the stitches you ve already done, on the wrong side, for about 1/2 to 1 inch depending on stitch size. The
              Message 6 of 14 , Feb 2, 2004
                Capt Elias wrote:
                > Yeah, I am dying to know how you finish the beginning and ends of a thread in blackwork...
                > If I could get past that I might well give it a try.

                The quick answer is "weave them through/under the stitches you've
                already done, on the wrong side, for about 1/2 to 1 inch depending on
                stitch size." The only exception is the very first thread, where you
                have nothing to weave in to. In that case, tie a knot, come down into
                the fabric several inches from where you really want to start, then
                make a loooong stitch to get to your actual starting point. When you're
                finished with that thread, snip the knot off, thread the long tail
                through a needle, and weave it through/under your stitching as usual.

                Yours,

                Katherine

                --
                Goodwife Katherine Rowberd (mka Kirrily "Skud" Robert)
                katherine@... http://elizabethangeek.com/
                Caldrithig, Skraeling Althing, Ealdormere
                "The rose is red, the leaves are grene, God save Elizabeth our Queene"
              • Kirrily Robert
                ... Hrm, I have two suggestions. First is how to make the blackwork balanced by choosing an appropriate thread weight for the fabric and design - many
                Message 7 of 14 , Feb 2, 2004
                  Beatrice wrote:
                  > I'm teaching an Introduction to Elizabethan Balckwork class at a
                  > local SCA event this weekend. I've been doing blackwork for about ten
                  > years, so much so that I've forgotten the questions I had when I
                  > first started.
                  >
                  > So, I have a request. If you have a moment and could be so kind,
                  > might you post and let me know what you wish someone had told you
                  > when you first started doing blackwork? What do you think a new
                  > person absolutely needs to know?

                  Hrm, I have two suggestions. First is how to make the blackwork
                  "balanced" by choosing an appropriate thread weight for the fabric and
                  design - many beginners choose to light a thread or the right thread but
                  large stitches, making the design look empty. Second is where to put
                  the blackwork - gently explain that blackwork is not appropriate for
                  embellishing a woollen tunic, for example, nor even for a silk Tudor
                  gown.

                  Yours,

                  Katherine

                  --
                  Goodwife Katherine Rowberd (mka Kirrily "Skud" Robert)
                  katherine@... http://elizabethangeek.com/
                  Caldrithig, Skraeling Althing, Ealdormere
                  "The rose is red, the leaves are grene, God save Elizabeth our Queene"
                • Jane Stockton
                  ... Despina, Gold thread and gold spangles were commonly used in blackwork especially on coifs and nightcaps. Cheers, Jane ... Jane Stockton -
                  Message 8 of 14 , Feb 2, 2004
                    At 02:32 AM 3/02/2004, you wrote:
                    >Are spangles or beads ever incorporated in blackwork embroidery in
                    >SCA period?
                    >
                    >Sounds like a great class.
                    >
                    >Smiles,
                    >Despina

                    Despina,

                    Gold thread and gold spangles were commonly used in blackwork especially on
                    coifs and nightcaps.

                    Cheers,
                    Jane


                    ------------------------------------
                    Jane Stockton - jane_stockton@...
                    Barony of Mordenvale, Kingdom of Lochac

                    In Prayse of the Needle - http://needleprayse.webcon.net.au/ (website)
                    The Needles Excellency - http://www.laren.blogspot.com/ (blog)


                    [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
                  • Christina L Biles
                    ... might you post and let me know what you wish someone had told you when you first started doing blackwork? What do you think a new person absolutely needs
                    Message 9 of 14 , Feb 2, 2004
                      Beatrice asked:

                      >>>So, I have a request. If you have a moment and could be so kind,
                      might you post and let me know what you wish someone had told you
                      when you first started doing blackwork? What do you think a new
                      person absolutely needs to know?


                      Things I wish someone had told me:

                      1. Blackwork was usually done silk on linen. There is more than one
                      weight & weave of linen, and silk comes in a wide variety of twist &
                      weights as well. (Personally, I really love my silk sewing thread for
                      blackwork.)

                      2. Styles of blackwork (lines, fillwork, speckle work, etc)

                      3. Blackwork was sometimes done in something other than double running
                      stitch.

                      4. It's ok to embroider on to the linen you want to make the shirt out of,
                      even if it isn't evenweave, you just have to compensate a little for the
                      difference in number of threads.

                      Things I wish someone had shown me:

                      1. close-up examples of extant period blackwork (so that I could have seen
                      what the linen & threads looked like)

                      2. a big handful of the various silk threads available on the market, to
                      show that Splendor and the like is not the only option.

                      -Magdalena who loves fine dense blackwork in the continental style
                    • Elizabeth Walpole
                      ... From: beatricesidney To: Sent: Monday, February 02, 2004 11:06 AM Subject: [Authentic_SCA]
                      Message 10 of 14 , Feb 2, 2004
                        ----- Original Message -----
                        From: "beatricesidney" <beatricesidney@...>
                        To: <Authentic_SCA@yahoogroups.com>
                        Sent: Monday, February 02, 2004 11:06 AM
                        Subject: [Authentic_SCA] Class suggestions?


                        > Greetings, all--
                        >
                        > I'm teaching an Introduction to Elizabethan Balckwork class at a
                        > local SCA event this weekend. I've been doing blackwork for about ten
                        > years, so much so that I've forgotten the questions I had when I
                        > first started.
                        >
                        > So, I have a request. If you have a moment and could be so kind,
                        > might you post and let me know what you wish someone had told you
                        > when you first started doing blackwork? What do you think a new
                        > person absolutely needs to know?
                        <snip>
                        > Many thanks for your assistance,
                        >
                        > Lady Beatrice Sidney

                        Well I tried blackwork once and found out I was crap at thread counting and
                        my designs ended up wonky. Though I had jumped straight from the cloth you
                        get in Xstitch kits to a piece of old sheet, so perhaps if I had tried
                        something with a looser or more defined weave it may have been easier. But I
                        don't know how experienced in general embroidery your students will be,
                        maybe they already know how to thread count on fine weave cloth.
                        Elizabeth

                        ----------------------------------------------------------------------------
                        ----
                        Elizabeth Beaumont
                        MKA:
                        Elizabeth Walpole
                        Politarchopolis, Lochac
                        ewalpole@...

                        People are like stained glass windows. They sparkle and shine when the sun
                        is out, but when the darkness sets in ,their true beauty is revealed only if
                        there is light from within.
                        Elizabeth Kubler-Ross

                        The years that a woman subtracts from her age are not lost. They are added
                        to the ages of other women.
                        Diane de Poitiers (1499-1566) Attrib.
                      • Kristen Dahle
                        ... When I teach German Brickstitch, I recommend that those who have trouble seeing fine work bring a hands-free magnifying glass. I use one myself at home to
                        Message 11 of 14 , Feb 2, 2004
                          > > I'm teaching an Introduction to Elizabethan Balckwork class
                          > maybe they already know how to thread count on fine weave cloth.

                          When I teach German Brickstitch, I recommend that those who have trouble
                          seeing fine work bring a hands-free magnifying glass. I use one myself at
                          home to ease eye strain, especially on tightly woven linen.

                          Pax,
                          Elisa
                        • Jan C. Lane
                          That being said, the one thing I wish I d been taught right off is how to hide the beginning and ending threads to make neat and stable finishes on the back.
                          Message 12 of 14 , Feb 3, 2004
                            "That being said, the one thing I wish I'd been taught right off is how to
                            hide the beginning and ending threads to make neat and stable finishes on
                            the back."

                            Would you please explain? I'd like to try a small blackwork item and would
                            dearly love to have this info.

                            Thank!

                            Jannifer
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