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on period medicine

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  • Kirrily Robert
    Something flew by in the last few days about period medicine, but I can t find it now so I m just going to start a new thread. Everyone has their own limits
    Message 1 of 11 , Jan 23, 2004
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      Something flew by in the last few days about period medicine, but I
      can't find it now so I'm just going to start a new thread.

      Everyone has their own limits for what they consider safe and unsafe,
      and in no way do I mean to imply that you should use medieval remedies
      for any kind of affliction (from a headache to a broken leg, and
      everything in between) unless you have really thought about it and feel
      safe doing so.

      That said, I think it would be cool to try out some of the more
      innocuous ones. Like, somewhere in my piles o' stuff I have medieval
      remedies for sore throats, pimples, etc, that are fairly innocuous. I
      seem to recall that the sore throat remedy is some normal culinary herbs
      and honey with wine, which you drink hot. Sounds quite pleasant, and
      I'd be more than happy to give that a try instead of Hall's lozenges.
      The pimple remedy is, if I recall correctly, lemon juice and salt dabbed
      onto the pimple - that actually sounds like it might work! I'd also be
      pretty happy to boil up some willow bark and try it for a headache.
      though I'd start with a small dose to figure out the right amount.

      I get kind of annoyed when people act as if medieval medicine is
      invariably toxic and dangerous. Some of it might be, but quite a bit of
      it is fairly mild and harmless, and some of it might just work. For
      instance I've read recently that they've done studies to show that
      bleeding patients can actually help kick the immune system into shape
      when it's flagging.

      I'm actually putting together a booklet on various household skills,
      including physick, so if anyone would like me to post a handful of
      Elizabethan remedies for stuff, let me know.

      Yours,

      Katherine

      --
      Goodwife Katherine Rowberd (mka Kirrily "Skud" Robert)
      katherine@... http://elizabethangeek.com/
      Caldrithig, Skraeling Althing, Ealdormere
      "The rose is red, the leaves are grene, God save Elizabeth our Queene"
    • Risa Strobel
      ... Yes Please! Risa
      Message 2 of 11 , Jan 23, 2004
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        > I'm actually putting together a booklet on various household skills,
        > including physick, so if anyone would like me to post a handful of
        > Elizabethan remedies for stuff, let me know.

        Yes Please!

        Risa
      • Maggie Forest
        ... yeah - remember that this is aspirin and so not good for some folks (me included). Some other neat remedies we use around the house ( cause it s easier to
        Message 3 of 11 , Jan 23, 2004
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          Katherine says:

          >pretty happy to boil up some willow bark and try it for a headache.
          >though I'd start with a small dose to figure out the right amount.

          yeah - remember that this is aspirin and so not good for some folks (me
          included).

          Some other neat remedies we use around the house ('cause it's easier to pick
          from the garden than having to go to the chemist) are feverfew for migraines
          (this works for hubby, not for me), horehound for coughs, wormwood for an
          overindulged stomach (yes, and yes, and no, we don't poison ourselves), and
          soapwort which is sometimes the only thing my incredibly sensitive skin will
          cope with for shampoo and soap duty.

          We also have a 'scrapes and bruises' cream I make with comfrey, lavender and tea
          tree (yeah, the latter is not period) that fixes everything the kids and hubby
          can come home with, and keeps my hands in control when I garden.

          /maggie

          Ex Factis Honestas Agnoscitur
        • Elizabeth Walpole
          ... Yep, there s also apparently new research going on in Russia? (I m pretty sure that s it but it may be another country in that area) that suggests that
          Message 4 of 11 , Jan 24, 2004
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            > I get kind of annoyed when people act as if medieval medicine is
            > invariably toxic and dangerous. Some of it might be, but quite a bit of
            > it is fairly mild and harmless, and some of it might just work. For
            > instance I've read recently that they've done studies to show that
            > bleeding patients can actually help kick the immune system into shape
            > when it's flagging.

            Yep, there's also apparently new research going on in Russia? (I'm pretty
            sure that's it but it may be another country in that area) that suggests
            that leeches actually can be beneficial, e.g. their spit is a much safer
            anti cloting agent than Warfarin (which is commonly used both to treat clots
            and as a major ingredient in rat poison, though obviously in different
            doses). I still hate the thought of one of them crawling about on me and
            sucking my blood, but if it's safer and they don't have to put the actual
            leech on me I'd rather have that than warfarin (sp?)


            > I'm actually putting together a booklet on various household skills,
            > including physick, so if anyone would like me to post a handful of
            > Elizabethan remedies for stuff, let me know.
            >
            > Yours,
            >
            > Katherine
            I for one would certainly be interested to look at it
            Elizabeth

            ----------------------------------------------------------------------------
            ----
            Elizabeth Beaumont
            MKA:
            Elizabeth Walpole
            Politarchopolis, Lochac
            ewalpole@...

            People are like stained glass windows. They sparkle and shine when the sun
            is out, but when the darkness sets in ,their true beauty is revealed only if
            there is light from within.
            Elizabeth Kubler-Ross

            The years that a woman subtracts from her age are not lost. They are added
            to the ages of other women.
            Diane de Poitiers (1499-1566) Attrib.
          • Kass McGann
            ... bit of ... shape ... It s fun to try new stuff for any reason, I think. And the current trend in homeopathic cures and natural remedies is much the same
            Message 5 of 11 , Jan 24, 2004
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              --- In Authentic_SCA@yahoogroups.com, Kirrily Robert <skud@i...>
              wrote:
              > I get kind of annoyed when people act as if medieval medicine is
              > invariably toxic and dangerous. Some of it might be, but quite a
              bit of
              > it is fairly mild and harmless, and some of it might just work. For
              > instance I've read recently that they've done studies to show that
              > bleeding patients can actually help kick the immune system into
              shape
              > when it's flagging.

              It's fun to try new stuff for any reason, I think. And the current
              trend in homeopathic cures and natural remedies is much the same
              thing. I do freelance work for drug companies and even they are
              starting to put echinachea and green tea extract into their products
              because that's what the public wants.

              So boiling up some willow bark or herbs and honey doesn't sound too
              awful to me.

              > I'm actually putting together a booklet on various household skills,
              > including physick, so if anyone would like me to post a handful of
              > Elizabethan remedies for stuff, let me know.

              It would be very interesting, Katherine. Please do!

              Kass
            • kittencat3@aol.com
              They ve been using leeches to reduce blood clots in certain types of wounds for at least a decade in the United States, depending on the hospital. They re
              Message 6 of 11 , Jan 24, 2004
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                They've been using leeches to reduce blood clots in certain types of wounds
                for at least a decade in the United States, depending on the hospital. They're
                also using maggots to eat dead flesh from gangerous wounds. Evidently both
                techniques work beautifully....

                Sarah Davies


                [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
              • Megan & Dave
                Yeah, I heard of the maggot one and was properly grossed. Even though they claim that they keep them in a teabag sort of arrangement so they don t crawl
                Message 7 of 11 , Jan 29, 2004
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                  Yeah, I heard of the maggot one and was properly grossed. Even though they claim that they keep them in a teabag sort of arrangement so they don't crawl directly on the wound there is still sufficient ick for me to make my stomach turn.
                  ----- Original Message -----
                  From: kittencat3@...
                  To: Authentic_SCA@yahoogroups.com
                  Sent: Saturday, January 24, 2004 11:54 PM
                  Subject: Re: [Authentic_SCA] on period medicine


                  They've been using leeches to reduce blood clots in certain types of wounds
                  for at least a decade in the United States, depending on the hospital. They're
                  also using maggots to eat dead flesh from gangerous wounds. Evidently both
                  techniques work beautifully....

                  Sarah Davies


                  [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]



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                • ladymorwenna
                  Speaking of medicine and icky buggies, has anyone seen any SCA-period remedies for bedbugs? I m interested in cures for bites or methods of removing/keeping
                  Message 8 of 11 , Jan 30, 2004
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                    Speaking of medicine and icky buggies, has anyone seen any SCA-period
                    remedies for bedbugs? I'm interested in cures for bites or methods of
                    removing/keeping them out of the house.

                    --Morwenna
                  • aheilvei
                    ... period ... of ... Pull the bed completely away from any wall, so that it s standing alone and touching nothing. Put the feet of the bed into jars (or
                    Message 9 of 11 , Feb 2, 2004
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                      --- In Authentic_SCA@yahoogroups.com, "ladymorwenna"
                      <ladymorwenna@y...> wrote:
                      > Speaking of medicine and icky buggies, has anyone seen any SCA-
                      period
                      > remedies for bedbugs? I'm interested in cures for bites or methods
                      of
                      > removing/keeping them out of the house.

                      Pull the bed completely away from any wall, so that it's standing
                      alone and touching nothing. Put the feet of the bed into jars (or
                      metal bowls) with water in them. The bedbugs will drown in the
                      water. Honest.

                      Despina de la got that cure from Bogdan
                    • ladymorwenna
                      ... Is this a period fix? It certainly sounds like it would work... --Morwenna stupid hotel... stupid bugs... grumble, grumble, grumble...
                      Message 10 of 11 , Feb 2, 2004
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                        > Pull the bed completely away from any wall, so that it's standing
                        > alone and touching nothing. Put the feet of the bed into jars (or
                        > metal bowls) with water in them. The bedbugs will drown in the
                        > water. Honest.
                        >
                        > Despina de la got that cure from Bogdan

                        Is this a period fix? It certainly sounds like it would work...

                        --Morwenna
                        stupid hotel... stupid bugs... grumble, grumble, grumble...
                      • aheilvei
                        ... IIRC, it is... I ll ask him tonight over laundry.... ick. Despina
                        Message 11 of 11 , Feb 2, 2004
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                          > Is this a period fix? It certainly sounds like it would work...

                          IIRC, it is... I'll ask him tonight over laundry.... ick.

                          Despina
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