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RE: Fourteenth century experiments

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  • ACatelli@manafortbrothers.com
    ... Here s my best recolection of Robin Netherton s lecture on the subject. Start with a U-shaped neckline, with the bottom of the U where you want the lower
    Message 1 of 1 , Jan 6, 2004
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      > I'm trying to figure out how you get a wide, rather than
      > deep, neckline,
      > because I really want to diminish the amount of cleavage on display.

      Here's my best recolection of Robin Netherton's lecture on the subject.


      Start with a U-shaped neckline, with the bottom of the U where you want the
      lower edge of the finished neck to be.
      Not actual uprights on the U, slightly off-grain, but not on the true bias
      or anything.
      Just a little bit off from the straight grain.


      Pull the neckline in two directions to get the desired shape.

      I'm going to show this in two steps, but I think it's all in one pull per
      fitting cycle.

      out: <-- U --> so the legs of the U lie flatter and more wide (lookie,
      the desired affect)

      up & out \ U / there would be arrowheads at the Top of the slash &
      backslash.

      How much of each depends on how your figure & your cloth work together.

      Eventually, there's a point at which the cloth stops stretching (the
      perpendicular threads are as close to parallel as they get).

      If this neckline is not wide enough for your tastes, you're going to have to
      cut another angled sliver off the U upright legs for a more biased edge and
      refit the stretch up & out.

      Yes, the whole stretch, pin, try, baste, try again, stretch process again.


      Errors mine, of course.
      One of the reasons (amongst many others) to see & hear a Robin Netherton
      lecture is that she moves her hand over her shoulder in the direction(s) the
      cloth needs to move.
      worth at least a thousand of my words.

      Good luck

      Ann in CT
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