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Re: Fourteenth century experiments.

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  • aheilvei
    ... disposable ... in the SCA, I am ... to become a ... fabric snob. ... Raquel, I *highly* suggest the following. In the groups area on yahoogroups we have a
    Message 1 of 4 , Jan 6, 2004
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      > Need more fabric. Frustrated by this, since I have very little
      disposable
      > cash right now, but I NEED MORE FABRIC, PEOPLE! After four years
      in the SCA, I am
      > suddenly turning into a fabric snob. This is bad. I cannot afford
      to become a
      > fabric snob. I should wait to be employed before becoming a
      fabric snob.
      >
      > Grimr, who has been a fabric snob for years, is laughing at me.


      Raquel,

      I *highly* suggest the following. In the groups area on yahoogroups
      we have a links section (it's on the left side of the screen for
      those who haven't been there). In the links section is a folder
      named 'fabric'. There are 12 links to fabric dealers, er, I mean
      sellers that have been used and praised by people on this list. The
      majority of them have great prices. Several of them deal in large
      quantities - which can lower your price. Figure out what you want
      and how much of it you need.

      Then, go to people in your local group and offer them the fabric *at
      cost*; don't forget to add in the shipping that you're going to be
      charged. You'd be amazed at how many people will jump on the
      bandwagon to get, say, linen at $6 or less per yard - or silk.
      Sure, those are the prices for white, but, again, if you go in
      together on a couple of dyes it's much less expensive in the long
      run and a container of dye lasts for more than one project. :)

      And point out that summer is just around the corner and they'll be
      wishing that they had linen at these prices when it's hot at
      events.... :)

      Hope this helps.

      Smiles,
      Despina
    • Arianne de Chateaumichel
      Raquel wrote, ... I have a sorquenie (14th c. undergown) that isn t QUITE as snug under the bust as it should be. The reason I haven t bothered to go back and
      Message 2 of 4 , Jan 9, 2004
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        Raquel wrote,

        >They were not kidding. Linen really does expand when you wear it for several
        >hours. I am going to have to go back and adjust the underdress to much more
        >skintight than I thought was necessary, or suffer the slowly sliding bosom
        >effect again. OTOH, the two dresses together did maintain a fair amount of bosom
        >support throughout the evening, I think through sheer bottleneck to the waist.

        I have a sorquenie (14th c. undergown) that isn't QUITE as snug under the bust as it
        should be. The reason I haven't bothered to go back and snug the seams is because
        it gives perfect support if I wear a chemise under it, even though the chemise, which is
        of a fine linen, is hardly what I would call "fitted" even though it is relatively snug. I
        suppose it works so much better because the presence of the chemise fills it out and
        adds another layer of friction. Since chemises were an integral part of the costuming of
        the era, I would feel better having it there even if it didn't help so much. If it's too hot for
        all three layers, I'm more likely to want to remove the cotehardie layer, anyway.

        >I'm trying to figure out how you get a wide, rather than deep, neckline,
        >because I really want to diminish the amount of cleavage on display.

        Really??!! For my cotehardies with the 14th century neckline (just about straight across,
        at least if you trust the art), I cut my necklines so high that the neck hole is actually only
        about an inch deep, while it is wide enough to just show the points of my shoulders.
        The shoulder curve is high in the back, so the weight of the gown rests on the bony
        backs of my shoulders. This prevents the gown from slipping down and showing off
        more than I want to show off. For my 15th c. cotehardies (the types shown in the _Tres
        Riches Heures_) I just lower the front neckline a bit. Five inches is enough of a
        decotellage on me to achieve that neckline. I don't know how much cleavage your
        outfit displayed, but I understand the desire to cover some of it up. Excessive
        cleavage is one of the big problems I've noticed when people make this style of gown.
        It can be quite sexy without showing lots of flesh!

        >Need more fabric. Frustrated by this, since I have very little disposable
        >cash right now, but I NEED MORE FABRIC, PEOPLE! After four years in the SCA, I am
        >suddenly turning into a fabric snob. This is bad. I cannot afford to become a
        >fabric snob. I should wait to be employed before becoming a fabric snob.

        Well, that would help! You'll find that the internet is your friend. I like Thai Silks
        <thaisilks.com> for sheer quantities of silk at really good prices, like less than $2 a yard
        for 3 momme silk gauze. Fabric.com is a small company out of Savannah that always
        has really good prices and tends to carry the types of fabrics we like. My last big
        favourite is Fabrics-store.com, which has a scrumtious variety of linen at really good
        prices, along with a huge selection of other fabrics, including many that are useful for
        us. And no, I don't work for any of these companies, although I'm sure if I did I could put
        the employee discount to good use!


        Your Servant,
        Honourable Lady Arianne de Chateaumichel

        Shire of Starhaven,
        Kingdom of Trimaris

        On the web at <http://www.chateau-michel.org>
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