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Bocksten Tunic patterns

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  • Paul
    Happy New Year!! Yesterday in some freetime I constructed a tunic from online patterns of the Bocksten. I didnt quite have the exact measurements, so I had to
    Message 1 of 4 , Jan 2, 2004
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      Happy New Year!!

      Yesterday in some freetime I constructed a tunic from online patterns
      of the Bocksten. I didnt quite have the exact measurements, so I had
      to eyeball it. I am rather proud that I ended up with a wearable
      tunic made form scrap cotton (I know its not correct) So now heres my
      question. The the majority if the pattern being laid out in straight
      lines is there a way to make it less tight across the chest and loser
      in the shoulders? Also how far up from the bottom should the gores
      extend in the front? Mine come up to about my ribcage.
      Is there evidence that tunics had buttons on the front to allow
      opening? Especially of a heavy wool like I am about to construct.

      Regards,

      Paul
    • Mary Bader Montgomery
      ... This may be a little too elementary a response, but you can increase the width of the front and back panels. You said that you didn t have exact
      Message 2 of 4 , Jan 2, 2004
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        At 05:07 PM 1/2/04 +0000, you wrote:
        >Happy New Year!!
        >
        >Yesterday in some freetime I constructed a tunic from online patterns
        >of the Bocksten. I didnt quite have the exact measurements, so I had
        >to eyeball it. I am rather proud that I ended up with a wearable
        >tunic made form scrap cotton (I know its not correct) So now heres my
        >question. The the majority if the pattern being laid out in straight
        >lines is there a way to make it less tight across the chest and loser
        >in the shoulders? Also how far up from the bottom should the gores
        >extend in the front? Mine come up to about my ribcage.
        >Is there evidence that tunics had buttons on the front to allow
        >opening? Especially of a heavy wool like I am about to construct.
        >
        >Regards,
        >
        >Paul

        This may be a little too elementary a response, but you can increase the
        width of the front and back panels. You said that you didn't have exact
        measurements. I have found from years of making clothes that most people
        underestimate their measurements and that they forget about the secret of
        comfortable clothes: Wearing ease. In order to make a close-fitting
        garment, you need to make it about 2" larger than your
        measurement. Fashion ease adds more. I'm not familiar with the Bocksten
        to which you refer, but the description of the cut is similar to most
        "shirts" of the earlier Middle Ages. Most of those have a fairly loose
        cut. In such a case, I'd give at least 6" fashion ease for a slim person,
        and 8" for a heftier person.

        Tunics had buttons in a number of different periods, most of which are
        later than the rectilinear-cut garments you describe. I do recall a few
        examples, but couldn't give you specifics, of some with short slits that
        close with a button or two to close it.

        Not near my books right now.

        Mary Taran


        [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
      • Marc Carlson
        ... Yesterday in some freetime I constructed a tunic from online patterns ... If you want to stick to the Bocksten format, use wider fabric. It you are
        Message 3 of 4 , Jan 2, 2004
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          --- In Authentic_SCA@yahoogroups.com, "Paul" <grenadier916@h...> wrote:
          Yesterday in some freetime I constructed a tunic from online patterns
          > of the Bocksten. I didnt quite have the exact measurements, so I had
          > to eyeball it. I am rather proud that I ended up with a wearable
          > tunic made form scrap cotton (I know its not correct) So now heres
          > my question. The the majority if the pattern being laid out in
          > straight lines is there a way to make it less tight across the chest
          > and loser in the shoulders?

          If you want to stick to the Bocksten format, use wider fabric. It you
          are willing to spread out to other other garments from the same
          general era, then you can use side panels to "widen the fabric".

          > Also how far up from the bottom should the gores
          > extend in the front? Mine come up to about my ribcage.

          Again, if you are reproducing the Bocksten, then it should come up to
          about to your waist/navel. If you are wanting something slightly
          different, then the ribcage is ok. Personally I suspect that the
          garments depicted in 13th century documents like the Mac Bible and the
          Manessa Codex would have been made with gores going up to the center
          of the chest, even for a man's outfit.

          > Is there evidence that tunics had buttons on the front to allow
          > opening? Especially of a heavy wool like I am about to construct.

          Certainly some did. Not the Bocksten, mind you, but others. You
          could takea look at
          http://www.personal.utulsa.edu/~marc-carlson/cloth/tunics.html for
          some examples.

          Marc/Diarmaid
        • Heather Rose Jones
          ... For this type of garment, working from the general schematic and then adapting it to your measurements (and materials) is the best way to go anyway. So
          Message 4 of 4 , Jan 2, 2004
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            At 5:07 PM +0000 1/2/04, Paul wrote:
            >Happy New Year!!
            >
            >Yesterday in some freetime I constructed a tunic from online patterns
            >of the Bocksten. I didnt quite have the exact measurements, so I had
            >to eyeball it.


            For this type of garment, working from the general schematic and then
            adapting it to your measurements (and materials) is the best way to
            go anyway. So what you did would have been the best approach even if
            you _had_ the exact measurements.


            > I am rather proud that I ended up with a wearable
            >tunic made form scrap cotton (I know its not correct) So now heres my
            >question. The the majority if the pattern being laid out in straight
            >lines is there a way to make it less tight across the chest and loser
            >in the shoulders?


            Given the narrowness of the sleeve attachment, you don't really want
            much looseness around the shoulders. If you make it too loose, then
            (perhaps counter-intuitively) you lose a lot of your arm movement.
            The version I made of this garment also came out fairly snug fitting,
            but once you accept that it's supposed to fit that way, it may not be
            a problem. (This is assuming that it isn't, in fact, simply too
            small.) I'd say that the best way to add a little ease in the chest
            and shoulders is in picking a fabric with a little more stretch to
            it. (*grin* ... like wool)

            If you find you simply can't get comfortable with something this
            snug, you may want to try a different model to work from. For
            example, the sleeve types characteristic of the Herjolfsness garments
            (not meaning to imply that they're all the same) are a bit more
            conducive to a loose fit at the chest and shoulders (being slightly
            fuller at the top, and set into a more shaped armscye).


            >Also how far up from the bottom should the gores
            >extend in the front? Mine come up to about my ribcage.


            While there are some garments in this general style-family where the
            gores extend that high, I believe a good rule of thumb for the
            Bocksten tunic is that they should end around the belt-line.


            >Is there evidence that tunics had buttons on the front to allow
            >opening? Especially of a heavy wool like I am about to construct.

            Ah, now if you want to make a button-front garment of heavier wool,
            then I highly recommend Herjolfsness #63
            <http://www.personal.utulsa.edu/~marc-carlson/cloth/herjol63.html>.
            It's a much looser-fitting style with a open front that buttons.

            Tangwystyl
            --
            *****
            Heather Rose (you may now call me Doctor) Jones
            hrjones@...
            *****
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