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Aquamaniles, was Re: Digest Number 2149

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  • wodeford
    ... price? I got a pottery one at Pennsic a couple of years ago in the shape of a Ram. http://www.geocities.com/karen_larsdatter/aquamaniles.htm lists examples
    Message 1 of 10 , Jan 1, 2004
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      --- In Authentic_SCA@yahoogroups.com, "Giovanna d'Este"
      <bellagia@h...> wrote:
      > And a question to the list. Does anyone know of anyone who makes
      > aquamaniles, and does so at something approximating a reasonable
      price?

      I got a pottery one at Pennsic a couple of years ago in the shape of
      a Ram.

      http://www.geocities.com/karen_larsdatter/aquamaniles.htm lists
      examples AND links to merchants, including Starhammer, where I got
      mine.

      Jehanne de Wodeford
    • MMM
      http://www.fetteredcockpewters.com/page_home.htm Are starting to varry aquamaniles. If you don t see what you want, do talk to the proprietress. Madinia ...
      Message 2 of 10 , Jan 1, 2004
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        http://www.fetteredcockpewters.com/page_home.htm
        Are starting to varry aquamaniles. If you don't see what you want, do
        talk to the proprietress.

        Madinia

        > -----Original Message-----
        > From: Giovanna d'Este [mailto:bellagia@...]
        > Sent: Wednesday, December 31, 2003 9:33 PM
        > To: Authentic_SCA@yahoogroups.com
        > Subject: RE: [Authentic_SCA] Digest Number 2149
        >
        > Congratulations to Doctor Jones, from someone who hates statistics
        more than
        > she wants her bachelor's degree, at least at the moment. (wry grin)
        >
        > And a question to the list. Does anyone know of anyone who makes
        > aquamaniles, and does so at something approximating a reasonable
        price?
        > Links and email addresses will win points in heaven. The quest to set
        a
        > proper table continueth...
        >
        >
        >
        > Yours in service,
        > Lady Giovanna d'Este
        >
        > Vert, on a billet Or three fleurs-de-lys, one and two, sable, a
        bordure
        > dancetty Or.
        >
        > "Numquam Succumbe"
        >
        > _________________________________________________________________
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      • Heather Rose Jones
        ... The degree is in linguistics. In theory, I only would have had to know two non-native languages to get through the program. (You have to take a language
        Message 3 of 10 , Jan 1, 2004
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          At 11:12 PM -0500 12/31/03, Anthony J. Bryant wrote:
          >Dr. Jones wrote:
          >
          > > Heather Rose (you may now call me Doctor) Jones
          >
          >
          >Congratulations, Heather!!
          >
          >What is the Ph.D. officially in? Welsh, or linguistics, or what? (And how many
          >lingos did you have to deal with to get there?)


          The degree is in linguistics. In theory, I only would have had to
          know two non-native languages to get through the program. (You have
          to take a language competency exam in two languages. Back when my
          department was young, a century ago, it was required that one of them
          be from Greek/Latin/Sanskrit.) But since I'm a charter member of the
          "dead Indo-European language of the month" club, the concept "have
          to" didn't really apply! The real turning point in my dissertation
          progress was when I decided I really had to stop messing around
          learning new languages and focus on getting the dissertation written!

          When you're a linguist, you often get people asking you "how many
          languages do you know?" and you always have start by explaining that
          it depends on what you mean by "know". When it comes down to it, I
          can only really _speak_ two non-English languages: Welsh and German
          (and I'd do better in Welsh if they didn't want me to use this silly
          modern version of the language). Then there are the languages that I
          can read moderately well (in my specialized areas) only using a
          dictionary to help with vocabulary, which would include (*visualizes
          map*): Old Norse (and some modern Scandinavian languages as long as
          the text is about things I'm familiar with), Latin, French (which
          I've never formally studied). Then there's the list of languages
          I've formally studied, but would need to use both a grammar book and
          dictionary to work my way through any significant text: Old Irish,
          Breton, Basque, Attic Greek, Hittite, Sanskrit. There are the
          languages I've formally studied, but even a grammar book and
          dictionary probably wouldn't get me through a text competently:
          Russian, Ingush. And then there are the languages that I _haven't_
          formally studied, but that are similar enough to things I _have_ that
          I could make my way through them with a grammar and dictionary:
          Spanish, Italian, Cornish, the several modern Scandinavian languages,
          various older versions of languages I've studied, like Gothic, Old
          English, Medieval Breton. One of these days, I really need to remedy
          my weakness in the Slavic languages and maybe even tackle one of the
          Baltic languages (I've got some interesting archaeological reports in
          Lithuanian). And I've promised myself that if I get up the energy to
          tackle another modern non-Indo-European language, it'll be Finnish,
          because I actually have friends in Finland that I could practice it
          with.

          The biggest side benefit of studying a lot of languages is that it
          helps _immensely_ when doing medieval research outside those fields
          popular in English-language scholarship. I can work my way through a
          textile archaeology report in a startling number of languages and
          extract things like when, where, what, how, and where to find more
          information.


          >I'm going to have a glass of the *good* scotch in your honor!
          >
          >BTW, I found a CD I'd forgotten I had -- "Ceredwen O'r Mabinogi"
          >from Real Music
          >-- lots of cool Welsh music (well, okay, Welsh music in the same
          >sense that some
          >of Enya and Clannad are Irish -- not traditional stuff). Have you
          >heard this one?

          Not familiar with it, sorry.

          Tangwystyl
          --
          *****
          Heather Rose (you may now call me Doctor) Jones
          hrjones@...
          *****
        • azilisarmor
          ... more than ... Sadness. Dismay. I teach stats. It isn t that bad. Kinda grows on you. Finish the bachelor s. Deroch
          Message 4 of 10 , Jan 1, 2004
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            --- In Authentic_SCA@yahoogroups.com, "Giovanna d'Este"
            <bellagia@h...> wrote:
            > Congratulations to Doctor Jones, from someone who hates statistics
            more than
            > she wants her bachelor's degree, at least at the moment. (wry grin)

            >
            > Yours in service,
            > Lady Giovanna d'Este

            Sadness. Dismay.
            I teach stats.
            It isn't that bad.
            Kinda grows on you.
            Finish the bachelor's.
            Deroch
          • wodeford
            ... But it s useful as a party trick! ;- I ve been teaching some medieval Christmas carols at recent events here in the West. We re singing one when Tangwystl
            Message 5 of 10 , Jan 1, 2004
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              --- In Authentic_SCA@yahoogroups.com, Heather Rose Jones
              <hrjones@s...> wrote:
              > But since I'm a charter member of the
              > "dead Indo-European language of the month" club, the concept "have
              > to" didn't really apply!

              But it's useful as a party trick! ;-> I've been teaching some
              medieval Christmas carols at recent events here in the West. We're
              singing one when Tangwystl comments that the syntax of the Latin
              lyric is really peculiar - not that I would have known this, Latin
              not being one of my rusty languages, except to sing in. However, the
              song in question, "Dies est laeticiae," comes from a 1582 manuscript
              known as the Piae Cantiones - from Turku, Finland.

              Jehanne de Wodeford
            • katherinejsanders
              Well done Heather! Axios! ... often get people asking you how many ... that ... and Oh my goodness! I feel like an illiterate! My thesis only really needed
              Message 6 of 10 , Jan 2, 2004
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                Well done Heather! Axios!
                > > > Heather Rose (you may now call me Doctor) Jones

                > The degree is in linguistics. <snip>When you're a linguist, you
                often get people asking you "how many
                > languages do you know?" and you always have start by explaining
                that
                > it depends on what you mean by "know". <snip> Latin, French (which
                > I've never formally studied). Then there's the list of languages
                > I've formally studied, but would need to use both a grammar book
                and

                Oh my goodness! I feel like an illiterate! My thesis only really
                needed one dead-language, biblical Hebrew, French and a smattering of
                German, with a couple of greek words thrown in. Oy!
                May I suggest, if you every get /really/ bored, toying with Ugaritic?
                It's a late bronze 12thc north west semitic dialect, similar to
                hebrew, related to arabic, akkadian and aramaic (which I've not
                worked on) and was written with 30 cuneiform sign-combinations
                (aka 'letters'!). It gets to the fun part when you're working with
                about five dictionaries, three other translations and obligatory
                coffee trying to work out if that three letter bunch is a verb, noun,
                adjective, etc, etc. There is only one punctuation mark which we
                think may be a full stop. Heheheh. Brings back all those stress
                headaches... Still, the actual texts are fun.

                And I've promised myself that if I get up the energy to
                > tackle another modern non-Indo-European language, it'll be Finnish,
                > because I actually have friends in Finland that I could practice it
                > with.

                I'm still up to my eyes with p/t sciences (catching up on high school
                level) but am torn between Scots Gaelic - which some friends do
                speak - and Swedish/Danish, two of my favourite holiday destinations.

                Thanks to all who've offered congrats on finishing my thesis - it
                still doesn't seem quite over. My own library will only allow
                visiting - no borrowing without handing over cash in advance. Given
                my record though... :-)

                Off for coffee and more MS Bodl 264 Romance of Alexandering (now
                there's something I couldn't really do when studying)
                Katherine
              • Karen
                Apologies to those who ve tried to go through http://www.geocities.com/karen_larsdatter/aquamaniles.htm and tried to get to StarHammer -- that link is woefully
                Message 7 of 10 , Jan 2, 2004
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                  Apologies to those who've tried to go through
                  http://www.geocities.com/karen_larsdatter/aquamaniles.htm and tried to
                  get to StarHammer -- that link is woefully out of date, and I'm not
                  sure if there's a new site. I think Hroar Stormgengr's contact
                  information at http://www.midlaurel.com/companions.shtml is current,
                  though.

                  Did a bit of surfing and came across another company that's now doing
                  ceramic reproware -- including aquamaniles -- it's
                  http://rakurakutei.com/ (and I'm adding that link to the aquamaniles
                  page and the feast gear page on my Geocities site now) :)

                  Karen
                • aheilvei
                  Mistress Nona the Midwife of Stormgengr (she s in the Middle Kingdom) did an amazing aquamanile a couple of years ago - Spanish style, IIRC. It was blue and
                  Message 8 of 10 , Jan 5, 2004
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                    Mistress Nona the Midwife of Stormgengr (she's in the Middle
                    Kingdom) did an amazing aquamanile a couple of years ago - Spanish
                    style, IIRC. It was blue and white and positively stunning!

                    Smiles,
                    Despina
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