Loading ...
Sorry, an error occurred while loading the content.

Re: Speaking of jupons...

Expand Messages
  • Sunny Medlock
    ... medieval military patterns which might get you started. Not having made any of these I cannot comment on how good they are, though I did a houppelande from
    Message 1 of 8 , Dec 3, 2003
    • 0 Attachment
      --- In Authentic_SCA@yahoogroups.com, "wodeford" <wodeford@y...>
      wrote:
      > --- In Authentic_SCA@yahoogroups.com, "Talia" <talia@k...> wrote:
      > > Is there a historical pattern company that makes an authentic
      > > (well, as we know it anyway) pattern for a 14th c. jupon? ...
      >
      > http://www.mediaevalmisc.com/patterns.htm has two packets of
      medieval military patterns which might get you started. Not having
      made any of these I cannot comment on how good they are, though I did
      a houppelande from one of their pattern packs that came out nicely.
      >
      > Jehanne de Wodeford

      I have made a few of their patterns, and in my opinion, they are for
      reference only. Here's some of what I have learned...
      1. Trace all pattern pieces onto some other paper. Oftentimes 2
      pattern pieces are overlapping, so to get to one you have to destroy
      the other...
      2. ALWAYS make a muslin. A friend and I were making the Men's
      Italian Ren Doublet. The instructions say to gather the sleeve into
      the armscye. The picture on the envelope shows a sleeve gathered
      into the armscye. The actuall sleeve does _not_ gather into the
      armscye. We did not make a muslin first, assuming that the pattern
      would have been drafted as the picture indicated, did not have enough
      fabric to cut a new sleeve, and had to come up with a creative
      solution to make what we had work. Most frustrating!
      3. Read the instructions-twice. I have found them confusing at best
      and needed to assemble things a bit differently than the pattern
      recomended.

      In my experience, patterns from Medieval Miscelania are a good
      starting point for more experienced sewers. There are too many
      complications for the newbie to gain any sort of confidence from

      Elisabetta (who fantisizes about creating her own line of period
      patterns)
    Your message has been successfully submitted and would be delivered to recipients shortly.