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Re: RE: [Authentic_SCA] Re: Textile conservation

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  • Mary Bader Montgomery
    ... I also measure my stash by the tub. I have an Excel spreadsheet that describes each piece in each (numbered) tub. It s a lot easier to rummage through
    Message 1 of 22 , Nov 3, 2003
      At 01:10 PM 11/3/03 -0600, you wrote:


      > > I have three bathtub size rubbermaids of assorted
      > > fabrics and two 114 liter rubbermaids of silk. I know, it's a bit
      > > embarrassing, but I can't help it.
      > >
      > >
      >
      >One of those tidbits I've picked up somewhere is that with such a
      >collection of tubs with fabrics is that you should have a box of cards
      >that has a snip of the fabric, yardage and fiber content if known with a
      >label as to which box it is in. That way when you're looking for a
      >particular type or piece it doesn't take long to find, unless you prefer
      >that periodic search through your stash to touch everything, before you
      >get to what you need.
      >
      >
      >Alex

      I also measure my stash by the tub. I have an Excel spreadsheet that
      describes each piece in each (numbered) tub. It's a lot easier to rummage
      through one tub that has something that you think might have what you
      remember than to go through all umpty-ump tubs. Some sort by fabric types,
      some by color. Another option is to scan the fabric. That way you can see
      it, and go rummage with an even better idea than just the verbal
      description. I haven't yet gone to the card and swatch system, but I may
      yet.


      [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
    • Marsha McLean
      Actually (as the original poster) I would never trust my silks to a storage facility. A family friend lost a fortune in antiques (stored during a move) to a
      Message 2 of 22 , Nov 3, 2003
        Actually (as the original poster) I would never trust my silks to a
        storage facility. A family friend lost a fortune in antiques (stored
        during a move) to a leaky roof. No, I am thinking of my own shed in my
        own yard, all critter-proof and watertight.

        Madinia
      • ladymorwenna
        ... Okay, I got some more info. You don t want to use airtight storage. You need air circulation. The recommended RH (relative humidity) is 50%. You absolutely
        Message 3 of 22 , Nov 3, 2003
          > Is there anyone on this list with textile conservation experience?
          > I am trying to work out options for storing silks and other textiles
          > in my sewing fabric stash. I am looking at a very limited storage
          > situation and wondering if airtight storage in an unheated structure
          > is detrimental to fibers?
          >
          > Thanks!
          >
          > Madinia

          Okay, I got some more info.

          You don't want to use airtight storage. You need air circulation.

          The recommended RH (relative humidity) is 50%. You absolutely want to
          avoid any chance of condensation. I think you can use silica gel to
          get that RH, but the specifics are in my books at home.

          Cold storage is good for textiles (and furs). It keeps buggies from
          living in the stuff. I found a recommendation of 15 C to 25 C, but I'd
          like to check my books. Avoid fluctuation in temperatures.

          Good storage materials are polypropylene, polyethylene, ethafoam,
          unbuffered acid free paper or tissue.

          --Abigail
          again, Morwenna desn't know from this stuff.
        • ranvaig@columbus.rr.com
          ... I have about 15 60 gal tubs of fabric, and I try to keep them sorted so there is no need to search through the all tubs. One for colored linen, one for
          Message 4 of 22 , Nov 4, 2003
            ><G> thanks, got it. Only recently, and the file system's been a
            >lifesaver; I can rummage through cards fingering samples, rather than
            >upending tubs and wading through the ensuing mountain.

            I have about 15 60 gal tubs of fabric, and I try to keep
            them sorted so there is no need to search through the all tubs.
            One for colored linen, one for white, one for period colored
            cotton (now probably destined for gold key garb)
            one for silk and wool. Others for modern fabrics.
            One for next few projects.

            On trick I've found, is to place the fabric vertically in
            the box, not flat. Stand the bin on end, and stack
            the fabric, with the last fold facing out. Then browsing
            through the bin is like looking through a file cabinet, and
            you can take out the piece you want without disturbing
            the rest. It only works when the boxes are pretty full,
            but that doesn't seem to be a problem.

            Ranvaig
          • Marsha McLean
            Wow! And I thought I had a lot. The on-end idea is a good one. I d actually thought of it *after* the project was done. I ll reorganize soon and change it.
            Message 5 of 22 , Nov 4, 2003
              Wow! And I thought I had a lot. The on-end idea is a good one. I'd
              actually thought of it *after* the project was done. I'll reorganize
              soon and change it. I sew by inspiration and choose fabrics tactile-ly
              as well as by sight, so having the edges poking up would save a lot of
              trouble. I'd also thought of an actual file-cabinet for fabric. Each
              fiber type gets a drawer ( or several) and each piece gets a hanging
              file.

              Madinia (organized someday...)
            • Mary Bader Montgomery
              ... Since my purchase method is 10 yards or the rest of the bolt, whichever comes first, and if the end of the bolt is pretty close, throw that in, too many
              Message 6 of 22 , Nov 4, 2003
                At 08:50 AM 11/4/03 -0500, you wrote:
                >Wow! And I thought I had a lot. The on-end idea is a good one. I'd
                >actually thought of it *after* the project was done. I'll reorganize
                >soon and change it. I sew by inspiration and choose fabrics tactile-ly
                >as well as by sight, so having the edges poking up would save a lot of
                >trouble. I'd also thought of an actual file-cabinet for fabric. Each
                >fiber type gets a drawer ( or several) and each piece gets a hanging
                >file.
                >
                >Madinia (organized someday...)

                Since my purchase method is "10 yards or the rest of the bolt, whichever
                comes first, and if the end of the bolt is pretty close, throw that in,
                too" many of my pieces are pretty bulky. I don't think a file-cabinet
                would be practical for me. I too like that on-edge method.

                Mary Taran


                [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
              • Marsha McLean
                Ah. Saris and silks are a bit more compact, easily folding to file (although thick) size.. Wools and cottons are another matter and would take more space. I
                Message 7 of 22 , Nov 4, 2003
                  Ah. Saris and silks are a bit more compact, easily folding to file
                  (although thick) size.. Wools and cottons are another matter and would
                  take more space.

                  I tend to but in 5 or 8 yard pieces, depending on whether the piece is
                  for a kirtle (5), or gown (8+). Or <shrug> to supplement a sari, which
                  isn't quite enough for a gown without more fudging than I care to do.

                  Madinia

                  text of previous message cut by moderator
                • ranvaig@columbus.rr.com
                  ... I ve culled it several times, but it seems to keep growing anyway. When I was in college I worked in a fabric store. Later a job was a short walk away
                  Message 8 of 22 , Nov 4, 2003
                    >Wow! And I thought I had a lot.

                    I've culled it several times, but it seems to keep growing anyway.
                    When I was in college I worked in a fabric store. Later a job was a
                    short walk away from a couture fabric store, I spent more time and
                    money than I should of in that place. Except for garb, I don't sew
                    that much any more, but sometimes I just can't resist buying
                    something.

                    At the old house I had a closet with shelves for my fabric and
                    fibers, but not nearly the space here at the new apartment. And all
                    the linen that I bought a year ago at Pennsic is still missing in the
                    storage locker. :(

                    Ranvaig
                  • Marsha McLean
                    I worked in a fabric store when I was in Columbus, a Joanne s. I was too clueless to buy the good stuff so what I have from back then is pretty much junk that
                    Message 9 of 22 , Nov 4, 2003
                      I worked in a fabric store when I was in Columbus, a Joanne's. I was
                      too clueless to buy the good stuff so what I have from back then is
                      pretty much junk that I'm sloooly culling. My main stash is silk and
                      some wool and a lovely figured velvet that was extremely tacky drapes
                      but will be reborn in splendor as a ropa.

                      I sew the occasional formalwear (less since divorce!) and going-out
                      outfit and garb and that's it.

                      Unfortunately I am a total sucker for silks. I can't *not* buy them.
                      Then I take them home and revel in them. A new sari usually lives on my
                      bed for a day or two. Heaven help me in India! I *know* I'm gonna
                      amaze customs with what I bring back.

                      And than I'll be toast for storage, because each sari is a very personal
                      thing for me and I could never give them up.

                      Madinia
                    • Talia
                      Can anyone point me in the right direction to research/document the use of sugar-glass and sugar-paste in food/subtleties? Thanks in advance, Talia Barony of
                      Message 10 of 22 , Nov 4, 2003
                        Can anyone point me in the right direction to research/document the use of
                        sugar-glass and sugar-paste in food/subtleties?

                        Thanks in advance,

                        Talia
                        Barony of Forgotten Sea
                        Calontir
                      • Kirrily Robert
                        ... Start with Stefan s Florilegium at http://florilegium.org/ ... I know he hangs out on the sca-cooks list and collects the best articles from there, so if
                        Message 11 of 22 , Nov 4, 2003
                          Talia wrote:
                          > Can anyone point me in the right direction to research/document the use of
                          > sugar-glass and sugar-paste in food/subtleties?

                          Start with Stefan's Florilegium at http://florilegium.org/ ... I know he
                          hangs out on the sca-cooks list and collects the best articles from
                          there, so if you find the sugar-paste articles you should find some good
                          references to get you started.

                          But, in short, just about any 16th century cookbook is going to have
                          recipes for one or the other :)

                          Yours,

                          Katherine

                          --
                          Lady Katherine Rowberd (mka Kirrily "Skud" Robert)
                          katherine@... http://elizabethangeek.com/
                          Caldrithig, Skraeling Althing, Ealdormere
                          "The rose is red, the leaves are grene, God save Elizabeth our Queene"
                        • aheilvei
                          Bogdan is tied up in the lab right now but he wanted me to tell you: Tell them to look in the archives. Or in the florelegium. Or Hugh Platt s Delight for
                          Message 12 of 22 , Nov 4, 2003
                            Bogdan is tied up in the lab right now but he wanted me to tell you:

                            Tell them to look in the archives.
                            Or in the florelegium.
                            Or Hugh Platt's Delight for Ladies.

                            Smiles,
                            Despina de la sorry I can't help more
                          • Christina L Biles
                            Despina said: Or Hugh Platt s Delight for Ladies. I uploaded a file from the 1602 edition of Delights for Ladies (image 16) that has a nice long sugar plate
                            Message 13 of 22 , Nov 4, 2003
                              Despina said:
                              Or Hugh Platt's Delight for Ladies.

                              I uploaded a file from the 1602 edition of Delights for Ladies (image 16)
                              that has a nice long sugar plate recipe. In case anyone cares, I found it
                              in EEBO.

                              -Magdalena
                            • Marsha McLean
                              ... OOH! Kinky cook-type guy! Despina should be helping. Madinia de la caffeine, me?!
                              Message 14 of 22 , Nov 4, 2003
                                > Bogdan is tied up in the lab right now
                                > Despina de la sorry I can't help more
                                >
                                OOH! Kinky cook-type guy! Despina should be helping.

                                Madinia de la caffeine, me?!
                              • peterofmarin
                                Hi Marsha, Use silicagel packs if you expect any humidity. Plastic tubs work well, use acid-free tissue if you need to separate heavily dyed pieces. store
                                Message 15 of 22 , Dec 1, 2003
                                  Hi Marsha,

                                  Use silicagel packs if you expect any humidity. Plastic tubs work well, use acid-free
                                  tissue if you need to separate heavily dyed pieces. store tubs up off the ground.

                                  -Peter
                                  http://www.RenaissanceGoods.com
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