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Request for book reviews

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  • Amy L. Hornburg Heilveil
    So no one reads or uses books out there? *grin* Hello everyone! A week ago I sent out a request for book reviews of books useful to those pursuing scribal
    Message 1 of 17 , Sep 29, 2003
      So no one reads or uses books out there? *grin*

      Hello everyone!

      A week ago I sent out a request for book reviews of books useful to those
      pursuing scribal adventures. I've so far gotten 10 responses, for which I
      am very grateful. There are over 600 people subscribed to this list (and a
      lot more on the other lists I asked). I was hoping for a more vigorous
      response and so am repeating my plea. *grin*

      Again, I'm asking for a single book review from people. You will be given
      credit for contributing to this bibliography. I intend to put the
      bibliography on the web as well as have it available in electronic format
      to give out and hand out in paper form. This is for sharing. If you want
      your name attached, please put it as you would like it included. If you
      want to give a review but would rather not have your name included in the
      contributors, please tell me that as well.

      I'm attempting to get a cross section of reviews from a number of people
      rather than the view of a select few, which is why this request has gone
      out on so many forums.

      I would like to have a bibliography compiled before November. So please
      send your reviews! *grin*

      Smiles,
      Despina

      Sample:
      "The Painted Page: Italian Renaissance Book Illumination 1450-1550" by
      Alexander, Armstrong, Mariani. Printed in 1994.
      If you want inspiration for an Italian piece, this is the book. It has
      examples as well as great descriptions of the pieces, much of the detailing
      that is lost in other books comes through beautifully with this printing.
      The essays give background on the cultural and political atmosphere of the
      time, including a section on Italian miniatures. I highly recommend it for
      the essays as well as the great photos. Review by Despina de la Brasov,
      Middle Kingdom




      ----------
      Quot Libros Quam Breve Tempus.
      So Many Books, So Little Time


      [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
    • Alanfrize@aol.com
      In a message dated 29/09/03 20:19:08 GMT Daylight Time, aheilvei@uiuc.edu ... Would you like ones of fictional books? Am working my way through one at the
      Message 2 of 17 , Sep 29, 2003
        In a message dated 29/09/03 20:19:08 GMT Daylight Time, aheilvei@...
        writes:


        > A week ago I sent out a request for book reviews of books useful to those
        > pursuing scribal adventures. I've so far gotten 10 responses, for which I
        > am very grateful. There are over 600 people subscribed to this list (and a
        > lot more on the other lists I asked). I was hoping for a more vigorous
        > response and so am repeating my plea. *grin*
        >
        >

        Would you like ones of fictional books? Am working my way through one at the
        moment, and have another coming up
        Alan


        [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
      • rowen_g
        Well, it s been a *very* long time since I ve done illumination, but I still have several of the source books around. I m sure you have reviews on some of the
        Message 3 of 17 , Sep 29, 2003
          Well, it's been a *very* long time since I've done illumination, but I
          still have several of the source books around. I'm sure you have
          reviews on some of the more popular ones; have you seen "Birds in
          Medieval Manuscripts"? It has a lot of great details.

          Rowen

          (currently working on "cataloging" her own library...)


          --- In Authentic_SCA@yahoogroups.com, "Amy L. Hornburg Heilveil"
          <aheilvei@u...> wrote:
          > So no one reads or uses books out there? *grin*
          >
          > Hello everyone!
          >
          > A week ago I sent out a request for book reviews of books useful to
          those
          > pursuing scribal adventures. I've so far gotten 10 responses, for
          which I
          > am very grateful. There are over 600 people subscribed to this list
          (and a
          > lot more on the other lists I asked).
        • Greg Lindahl
          ... It would definitely be a great idea to have more scribal sorts of bibliography information available. As I ve mentioned before, I have a series of webpages
          Message 4 of 17 , Sep 29, 2003
            On Mon, Sep 29, 2003 at 02:16:49PM -0500, Amy L. Hornburg Heilveil wrote:

            > A week ago I sent out a request for book reviews of books useful to those
            > pursuing scribal adventures.

            It would definitely be a great idea to have more scribal sorts of
            bibliography information available. As I've mentioned before, I have
            a series of webpages about books, and my bibliography collection:

            http://aands.org/bib.html

            has only 1 bibliography relevant to scribes, with just 24 entries.
            There's a lot more good information to be collected.

            Oh, and Despina, I'd love to point at yours when it's done. And I'd
            love to hear about any other bibliographies that people have.

            -- Gregory
          • aheilvei
            ... one at the ... I m looking more for books covering techinuqe, artists, materials, sources, original documents, and such for scribal and book arts that
            Message 5 of 17 , Sep 30, 2003
              > Would you like ones of fictional books? Am working my way through
              one at the
              > moment, and have another coming up
              > Alan


              I'm looking more for books covering techinuqe, artists, materials,
              sources, original documents, and such for scribal and book arts that
              would be helpful to someone wanting to know what books to
              purchase/borrow to further themselves in those areas. If there's a
              fictional book with such things in it that is reliable in those
              aspects, that would be great.

              Smiles,
              Despina
            • aheilvei
              ... I ve seen it but haven t yet gotten a review for it......yet.... *hint* *hint* Smiles, Despina
              Message 6 of 17 , Sep 30, 2003
                --- In Authentic_SCA@yahoogroups.com, "rowen_g" <rowengr@h...> wrote:
                > I'm sure you have
                > reviews on some of the more popular ones; have you seen "Birds in
                > Medieval Manuscripts"? It has a lot of great details.


                I've seen it but haven't yet gotten a review for it......yet....
                *hint* *hint*

                Smiles,
                Despina
              • aheilvei
                ... No problem Gregory! I d be happy to have you host it. I haven t got my website up and running yet so that would be wonderful. Smiles, Despina
                Message 7 of 17 , Sep 30, 2003
                  > has only 1 bibliography relevant to scribes, with just 24 entries.
                  > There's a lot more good information to be collected.
                  >
                  > Oh, and Despina, I'd love to point at yours when it's done.

                  No problem Gregory! I'd be happy to have you host it. I haven't
                  got my website up and running yet so that would be wonderful.

                  Smiles,
                  Despina
                • Alanfrize@aol.com
                  In a message dated 30/09/03 14:26:53 GMT Daylight Time, aheilvei@uiuc.edu ... I was thinking more of Umberto Eco s The Name of the Rose - when I did medieval
                  Message 8 of 17 , Sep 30, 2003
                    In a message dated 30/09/03 14:26:53 GMT Daylight Time, aheilvei@...
                    writes:


                    > If there's a
                    > fictional book with such things in it that is reliable in those
                    > aspects, that would be great.
                    >
                    >

                    I was thinking more of Umberto Eco's The Name of the Rose - when I did
                    medieval History at University, we were advised to read it, so as to get a good
                    understanding of what day-to-day Medieval life was like. Also Kemp: The Road to
                    Crecy by Daniel Hall, which again gives a good understanding of Medieval life,
                    as well as the social structures of the time. For those interested, much as
                    I enjoyed them, I'd hold against the Bernard Cornwell 'Grail' series - they're
                    a good read, but far too many inaccuracies - Scots wearing plaids in 1351 and
                    using pikes, all way too early!
                    Alan


                    [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
                  • aheilvei
                    ... *snip* Also Kemp: The Road to ... Medieval life, ... These sound like great books to put into the groups bookshelf in the database section for the groups
                    Message 9 of 17 , Sep 30, 2003
                      > I was thinking more of Umberto Eco's The Name of the Rose -

                      *snip*
                      Also Kemp: The Road to
                      > Crecy by Daniel Hall, which again gives a good understanding of
                      Medieval life,
                      > as well as the social structures of the time.


                      These sound like great books to put into the groups bookshelf in the
                      database section for the groups Here:
                      http://groups.yahoo.com/group/Authentic_SCA/database?
                      method=reportRows&tbl=4

                      But I don't recall how much scribal information (which is what I'm
                      after) was given in _Name of the Rose_ it's been too long since I
                      read it. I agree that it's a good book for the flavor of the time
                      and getting into the mindset.

                      Despina
                    • Greg Lindahl
                      ... The main difference between the bibliographies on the web and the group s database is that the group s database isn t accessible to non-members, and aren t
                      Message 10 of 17 , Sep 30, 2003
                        On Tue, Sep 30, 2003 at 01:58:27PM -0000, aheilvei wrote:

                        > These sound like great books to put into the groups bookshelf

                        The main difference between the bibliographies on the web and the
                        group's database is that the group's database isn't accessible to
                        non-members, and aren't indexed by search engines like google.

                        It looks like there are some interesting books in there -- how can I
                        find out who wrote the comments, so that I could ask them about
                        republishing them?

                        -- Gregory
                      • wodeford
                        ... Mine were all the music and daily life titles currently in the database as well as Hardy s Longbow and Jones Chaucer s Knight. You re welcome to pass
                        Message 11 of 17 , Sep 30, 2003
                          --- In Authentic_SCA@yahoogroups.com, Greg Lindahl <lindahl@p...>
                          wrote:
                          > On Tue, Sep 30, 2003 at 01:58:27PM -0000, aheilvei wrote:
                          >
                          > > These sound like great books to put into the groups bookshelf
                          >
                          > The main difference between the bibliographies on the web and the
                          > group's database is that the group's database isn't accessible to
                          > non-members, and aren't indexed by search engines like google.
                          >
                          > It looks like there are some interesting books in there -- how can I
                          > find out who wrote the comments, so that I could ask them about
                          > republishing them?
                          >
                          > -- Gregory

                          Mine were all the music and daily life titles currently in the
                          database as well as Hardy's "Longbow" and Jones' "Chaucer's Knight."
                          You're welcome to pass 'em on.

                          Jehanne
                        • aheilvei
                          ... I ... Since the idea of the reading list was to give good information about books that people on this list find helpful and would want to recommend, unless
                          Message 12 of 17 , Oct 1 6:17 AM
                            > It looks like there are some interesting books in there -- how can
                            I
                            > find out who wrote the comments, so that I could ask them about
                            > republishing them?


                            Since the idea of the reading list was to give good information
                            about books that people on this list find helpful and would want to
                            recommend, unless someone has problems with it, I'd say you may go
                            ahead and copy them out.

                            This list has never been about keeping information or good resources
                            to iteself, but rather passing them on and helping others. To that
                            end, I'd say go for it. Attributing the reviews to this list would
                            probably work, unless someone specifically wants their name on their
                            reviews. If so, speak up people!

                            Smiles,
                            Despina
                          • Meurig ap Cynfarch
                            ... 1351 and ... Is this inaccurate? I m no expert, so perhaps someone else can correct me. I was under the assumption that the scots used pikes/stakes at the
                            Message 13 of 17 , Jan 10, 2007
                              --- In Authentic_SCA@yahoogroups.com, Alanfrize@... wrote:
                              >
                              > ...I'd hold against the Bernard Cornwell 'Grail' series - they're
                              > a good read, but far too many inaccuracies - Scots wearing plaids in
                              1351 and
                              > using pikes, all way too early!
                              > Alan

                              Is this inaccurate? I'm no expert, so perhaps someone else can correct
                              me. I was under the assumption that the scots used pikes/stakes at the
                              Battle of Bannockburn in 1314, a tactic that lead to the defeat of the
                              English. The Flemish also used pike like weapons at the Battle of
                              Courtrai in 1302 against the French cavalry.

                              Plaids are period - just not the tartans and modern kilts of today.

                              Meurig
                            • Kerry Gillan
                              ... They quite liked the tartan look in the 14th C. http://sca-garb.freeservers.com/articles/plaidcote.html Angele
                              Message 14 of 17 , Jan 11, 2007
                                Meurig wrote:
                                > Plaids are period - just not the tartans and modern kilts of today.

                                They quite liked the tartan look in the 14th C.
                                http://sca-garb.freeservers.com/articles/plaidcote.html

                                Angele
                              • wodeford
                                ... Plaid weaves turn up in feudal Japan too. Kano Hideyori s The Maple Viewers Muromachi Period, 16th century.
                                Message 15 of 17 , Jan 11, 2007
                                  --- In Authentic_SCA@yahoogroups.com, "Meurig ap Cynfarch"
                                  <nicothoe@...> wrote:

                                  > Plaids are period - just not the tartans and modern kilts of today.

                                  Plaid weaves turn up in feudal Japan too.

                                  Kano Hideyori's "The Maple Viewers" Muromachi Period, 16th century.
                                  http://www.tnm.jp/gallery/search/images/max/C0042444.jpg

                                  Anonymous "Genre Scenes of the Twelve Months" Muromachi Period, 16th
                                  century.
                                  http://www.tnm.jp/gallery/search/images/max/C0022467.jpg
                                  http://www.tnm.jp/gallery/search/images/max/C0022470.jpg
                                  http://www.tnm.jp/gallery/search/images/max/C0022471.jpg

                                  (Can you tell I love this screen? It's a treasure trove on 16th
                                  century dress.)

                                  Jehanne de Wodeford/Saionji no Hanae
                                  West Kingdom
                                • Luiseach@aol.com
                                  I especially like the last picture, with the ladies looking over the bolts of fabric at the textile merchant s....you can practically hear them saying, No,
                                  Message 16 of 17 , Jan 14, 2007
                                    I especially like the last picture, with the ladies looking over the bolts
                                    of fabric at the textile merchant's....you can practically hear them saying,
                                    "No, get this one, that color's just wrong, wrong, wrong...."

                                    Luighseach nic Lochlainn




                                    [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
                                  • wodeford
                                    ... bolts ... saying, ... [Grin] That one is currently doing duty as wallpaper on my PC at home. It s a marvelous slice of 16th century Japanese life, that
                                    Message 17 of 17 , Jan 14, 2007
                                      --- In Authentic_SCA@yahoogroups.com, Luiseach@... wrote:
                                      > I especially like the last picture, with the ladies looking over the
                                      bolts
                                      > of fabric at the textile merchant's....you can practically hear them
                                      saying,
                                      > "No, get this one, that color's just wrong, wrong, wrong...."

                                      [Grin] That one is currently doing duty as wallpaper on my PC at home.
                                      It's a marvelous slice of 16th century Japanese life, that screen. One
                                      of my favorites....

                                      Jehanne de Wodeford who is sometimes Saionji no Hanae
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