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Re: to piece or not to piece

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  • demontsegur
    ... My personal philosophy is that when such a mistake is made, there is no shame in piecing on the extra fabric required to complete the overall
    Message 1 of 4 , Jun 1, 2003
      --- In Authentic_SCA@yahoogroups.com, "azilisarmor" <alsnchap@t...>
      wrote:
      > should I
      > (a) live with a hem that is about 6 inches above the ankle, or
      > (b) attach trim with a bit more fabric below, thereby extending
      > to ankle length, or
      > (c) piece on the additional 6 inches?

      My personal philosophy is that when such a mistake is made, there is
      no shame in piecing on the extra fabric required to complete the
      overall shape/silhouette/fit of the garment. It feels like a lesser
      sin to live with the inadvertent piecing than it is to feel weird
      with something that's missing, like your 6 inches of length at the
      bottom of the garment.

      Only recently I had to make a weird gore out of one regular and one
      irregular piece to complete a gown's skirt. I was short on fabric
      and it was the only way to give the skirt the minimal fullness
      required for its silhouette. When I was finished I was left with a
      literal handful of scraps -- that's how creative I had to get. It's
      not much of a stretch to imagine that people made garments using
      creative piecing techniques throughout our period, given the
      relative value of cloth and the sweat equity in making it.... and
      the human error factor, which, AFAIK, hasn't changed one whit from
      period to present. ;^P

      > On a related note, does anyone know what those strips of trim
      > are one sees on thigh area of Frankish gowns?

      I wish I could help with this question, but alas, I don't have the
      info.

      Good luck,
      Marcele
    • Tiffany Brown / Lady Teffania Tukerton
      ... I ve seen several 12th century pictures in the anglo saxon style with a strip of trim between two folds at the calf level. I ve been assuming that these
      Message 2 of 4 , Jun 10, 2003
        > > On a related note, does anyone know what those strips of trim
        > > are one sees on thigh area of Frankish gowns?

        I've seen several 12th century pictures in the anglo saxon style with
        a strip of trim between two folds at the calf level.

        I've been assuming that these are just extra decorative elements
        unique to the anglo-saxon artistic style. Why
        - it is just too silly to have a small (about 10cm wide) piece of
        trim here, and not around the whole dress
        - Even if it was there, it ends to conveniently at the places where
        the dress folds in whatever particular posture the person is in.
        - they look very decorative - I remember one done in white on a
        coloured dress. This one was more spiral (slightly less defined as a
        band). Is this circumstance it looked very much like some of the
        decorative elements on the side of the manuscript. This made me
        think the more band like ones were also decoration.
        -they could represent additional decoration that hte artist finds too
        difficult to draw in all of.

        Of course there are possible alternate explainations- eg it's a
        pouch, but I can't find one that seems likely yet.

        I'd love a real answer if anyone knows, of had a friendly art
        historian they can ask.

        Teffania Tuckerton
        Stormhold, Lochac(that's Melbourne, Australia), but going to pennsic
        this year(yay!!)
      • Heather Rose Jones
        ... I m not entirely sure if this is the sort of thing you re describing, but there is a decoration style on some surviving ecclesiastical garments of around
        Message 3 of 4 , Jun 11, 2003
          At 5:47 AM +0000 6/11/03, Tiffany Brown / Lady Teffania Tukerton wrote:
          > > > On a related note, does anyone know what those strips of trim
          >> > are one sees on thigh area of Frankish gowns? 
          >
          >I've seen several 12th century pictures in the anglo saxon style with
          >a strip of trim between two folds at the calf level.
          >
          >I've been assuming that these are just extra decorative elements
          >unique to the anglo-saxon artistic style. Why
          >- it is just too silly to have a small (about 10cm wide) piece of
          >trim here, and not around the whole dress
          >- Even if it was there, it ends to conveniently at the places where
          >the dress folds in whatever particular posture the person is in.
          >- they look very decorative - I remember one done in white on a
          >coloured dress. This one was more spiral (slightly less defined as a
          >band). Is this circumstance it looked very much like some of the
          >decorative elements on the side of the manuscript. This made me
          >think the more band like ones were also decoration.
          >-they could represent additional decoration that hte artist finds too
          >difficult to draw in all of.

          I'm not entirely sure if this is the sort of thing you're describing,
          but there is a decoration style on some surviving ecclesiastical
          garments of around the 12-13th century where there is a band of
          embroidered decoration at the center front of the hem that only
          extends across part of the front. (My impression is that if you
          dropped imaginary lines down where clavii would have been, the band
          runs between those two lines.)

          I can think of two possible reasons for this. One would be
          conservation of handwork -- adding a highly-decorated band only at
          the front where it would be visible when wearing a cope. The other
          possible explanation is that it's some relic of a decorative scheme
          surviving from when clavii _were_ part of the decoration scheme, and
          it survived when they didn't. (You can find Coptic tunics that
          combine clavii with horizontal decorative bands that run only between
          the clavii, so this isn't entirely handwaving.)

          I can get specific cites of garments with this type of decoration if
          you like -- that information isn't in my database and I don't want to
          trust my memory.

          Tangwystyl
          --
          *****
          Heather Rose Jones
          hrjones@...
          *****
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