Loading ...
Sorry, an error occurred while loading the content.
 

RE: [Authentic_SCA] Re: Bodkin (WAS: 1st garb/tunic + surcoat)

Expand Messages
  • Marsha McLean
    I ve also seen references to dolls as bodkins. Are we all confused yet? The scary part is we re all right. And we are having too much fun focusing on
    Message 1 of 2 , May 29, 2003
      I've also seen references to dolls as bodkins.

      Are we all confused yet? <G> The scary part is we're all right. And
      we are having too much fun focusing on just this one part of the quote.

      Madinia

      > -----Original Message-----
      > From: Chris Laning [mailto:claning@...]
      > Sent: Thursday, May 29, 2003 7:55 PM
      > To: Authentic_SCA@yahoogroups.com
      > Subject: [Authentic_SCA] Re: Bodkin (WAS: 1st garb/tunic + surcoat)
      >
      > Tangwystyl wrote:
      > > At 10:05 AM -0400 5/29/03, Marsha McLean wrote:
      > >>and of course Shakespeare is more likely talking about knives
      > >>in his references to bodkins ("When he himself might his
      > >>quietus make / With a bare bodkin?" in Hamlet III.i; "betwixt
      > >>the firmament and it you cannot thrust a bodkin's point" in
      > >>Winter's Tale III.iii; "The head of a bodkin" in Love's
      > >>Labor's Lost V.ii).
      > >
      > >Off the top of my head, I'll toss in the observation that I>believe
      there
      > are two functionally different objects commonly
      > >referred to as a "bodkin" -- one being a large, blunt, eyed
      > >needle-like object, and the other being a sharp, pointed awl
      > >like object. And just to confuse the issue, I think
      > >that "bodkin" (probably taken from the latter sense) can also
      > >be used, at lest metaphorically, for a small knife, or at least
      > >a sharpy pokey weapon.
      >
      > And a third set of meanings, which makes sense in some contexts but
      not
      > others -- "bodkin" can be short for "boddikin," i.e. "body" + "-kin"
      (a
      > diminutive suffix), making "boddikin" a sort of joking nickname for
      > "body." Shakespeare's references to "bodkins" are sometimes also puns
      on
      > this (especially when it says "my bare bodkin").
      >
      > Regards,
      > Christian de Holacombe
      >
      > ____________________________________________________________
      > 0 Chris Laning
      > | <claning@...>
      > + Davis, California
      > ____________________________________________________________
      >
      > ------------------------ Yahoo! Groups Sponsor
      >
      > ----------------------------------------------------
      > This is the Authentic SCA eGroup
      > To unsubscribe from this group, send an email to:
      > authentic_SCA-unsubscribe@egroups.com
      >
      >
      >
      > Your use of Yahoo! Groups is subject to
      http://docs.yahoo.com/info/terms/
    Your message has been successfully submitted and would be delivered to recipients shortly.