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Re: "Cotehardies"

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  • sismith42
    ... Heh, Marcele, the paper-tease! I guess this is one way of getting us to do our own (insert your choice of explicative here) research ;-) Stefania
    Message 1 of 20 , Apr 1, 2003
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      > I am to blame for mentioning it again and again and then
      > saying, "oops, but you can't see it yet!" Hardly fair! ;^)

      Heh, Marcele, the paper-tease! I guess this is one way of getting us
      to do our own (insert your choice of explicative here) research ;-)

      Stefania
    • Sarah Michele Ford
      ... Ha! I love it. This outfit is evidence for the soapbox I inherited from Kass: even the simplest garment can look great with the right cut and the right
      Message 2 of 20 , Apr 1, 2003
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        On Mon, 31 Mar 2003, demontsegur wrote:

        > I guess what I meant was that it is unique in a large field of generi-
        > tunics and modern-patterned 'cotehardies' (not at this competition,
        > specifically -- just generally in the SCA). For those who haven't
        > seen it yet, the gown is a periwinkle blue with some lovely, thin
        > tablet-woven trim sewn across it in horizontal bands from top to
        > bottom. Definitely the kind of dress that I can see Alianor wearing
        > and being stopped and questioned about... and consequently spreading
        > the Auth Virus. Or.. should we call it S.A.R.S -- "Serious
        > Authenticity/Research Syndrome"... :^P

        Ha! I love it. This outfit is evidence for the soapbox I inherited from
        Kass: even the simplest garment can look great with the right cut and the
        right fabric and attention to detail.

        There's a quick webpage about it at
        http://www.snowplow.org/sarah/Edith.html. It's actually a complete
        outfit: smock (linen), underdress (fustian), and gown (wool twill), with
        veil (linen - someday to be replaced with silk), hosen (white linen), and
        garters (same wool as the gown). Everything's handsewn, though with
        commercial cotton and cotton/poly thread (soon... soon I will buy 3,000
        yards of white linen from webs and never sew medieval clothes with
        cotton/poly again). All of the body garments are of the side-gore
        variety; one in each side of the smock (which is mid-calf length) and two
        each in the underdress and gown. (Incidentally, I do wear the red fustian
        dress solo quite a lot - it was one of my items in the Pennsic A&S display
        last year.) The gores on the underdress start at the waist; the goes on
        the gown start at the bottom of the gusset (I don't recommend this -
        gussets and gore points don't mesh well - next time I do a tunic this way
        I'm going to have at least SOME side seam). I decided to put the long
        gores in this gown because, looking at the illustration I was working
        from, there are clear folds (i.e., fullness) from the shoulders - and to
        me, the best way to get that fullness was by starting to increase the
        circumference of the garment as soon as possible.

        The trim is double-faced tabletweaving, made from wool. If I were doing
        it again, I'd use a finer thread for the trim - both to more faithfully
        reproduce what's in the illustration and because these bands are
        moderately thick - so they stand out from the garment and sometimes make
        it drape oddly.

        So that's my story. Sometime when I don't have 50 essay exams to grade by
        Friday and a PhD qualifying paper to write and a dissertation proposal
        to work on, I'll get my documentation and everything online. :^)

        Alianor de R

        Sarah Michele Ford
        /\/\/\/\/\/\/\/\/\/\/\/\/\/\/\/\/\/\/\/\/\/\/\
        Illusion is the general rule of the universe;
        reality is but an exception.
        --Jean Baudrillard
        \/\/\/\/\/\/\/\/\/\/\/\/\/\/\/\/\/\/\/\/\/\/\/
      • Amy L. Hornburg Heilveil
        ... Beautifully done! I like the colors on you. Smiles, Despina
        Message 3 of 20 , Apr 1, 2003
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          At 08:20 AM 4/1/2003 -0600, you wrote:
          There's a quick webpage about it at
          http://www.snowplow.org/sarah/Edith.html.  It's actually a complete
          outfit: smock (linen), underdress (fustian), and gown (wool twill), with
          veil (linen - someday to be replaced with silk), hosen (white linen), and
          garters (same wool as the gown).

          Beautifully done!  I like the colors on you.

          Smiles,
          Despina
        • kris
          ... The gown looks amazing! For me, since I am a pear shape, I usually start the side gores 1-2 inches below the armpit gussets. That gives me enough room to
          Message 4 of 20 , Apr 2, 2003
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            At 08:20 AM 01/04/2003 -0600, you wrote:
            >There's a quick webpage about it at
            >http://www.snowplow.org/sarah/Edith.html. It's actually a complete
            >outfit: smock (linen), underdress (fustian), and gown (wool twill), with
            >veil (linen - someday to be replaced with silk), hosen (white linen), and
            >garters (same wool as the gown). Everything's handsewn, though with
            >commercial cotton and cotton/poly thread (soon... soon I will buy 3,000
            >yards of white linen from webs and never sew medieval clothes with
            >cotton/poly again). All of the body garments are of the side-gore
            >variety; one in each side of the smock (which is mid-calf length) and two
            >each in the underdress and gown. (Incidentally, I do wear the red fustian
            >dress solo quite a lot - it was one of my items in the Pennsic A&S display
            >last year.) The gores on the underdress start at the waist; the goes on
            >the gown start at the bottom of the gusset (I don't recommend this -
            >gussets and gore points don't mesh well - next time I do a tunic this way
            >I'm going to have at least SOME side seam). I decided to put the long
            >gores in this gown because, looking at the illustration I was working
            >from, there are clear folds (i.e., fullness) from the shoulders - and to
            >me, the best way to get that fullness was by starting to increase the
            >circumference of the garment as soon as possible.

            The gown looks amazing!

            For me, since I am a pear shape, I usually start the side gores 1-2 inches
            below the armpit gussets. That gives me enough room to get the points
            looking good. Doing this, I can also get an overgown out of 2.5 metres of
            60" wide fabric.. it's not terribly full, but there's still room at the hips.

            I should really take pictures of some of my earlier period clothes. They're
            so comfy and warm!

            kris

            http://members.shaw.ca/ionization/
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